Assessment and control of the bioavailability of nickel in soils

Authors

  • Guillaume Echevarria,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
    • Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
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  • Stamatia Tina Massoura,

    1. Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
    2. Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1–7, rue Jean Monnet 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex, France
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  • Thibault Sterckeman,

    1. Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
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  • Thierry Becquer,

    1. Unité Mixte de Recherches (UMR 137) Biodiversité et Fonctionnement des Sols, IRD/Embrapa Cerrados, CP: 7091, 71619–970 Brasilia-DF, Brazil
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  • Christophe Schwartz,

    1. Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
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  • Jean Louis Morel

    1. Laboratoire Sols et Environnement UMR 1120 ENSAIA-INPL/INRA, BP 172, 54505 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy Cedex, France
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  • Presented at the Symposium on Risk Assessment of Metals in Soils, 14th Annual Meeting, SETAC Europe Meeting, Prague, Czech Republic, April 18–22, 2004.

Abstract

Nickel, a potentially toxic metal, is present in all soils with an average concentration of 20 to 30 mg/kg, sometimes exceeding 10,000 mg/kg (e.g., ultramafic soils). The ecotoxicological risk of Ni in soils to organisms is controlled by its availability. It is therefore essential to identify an efficient and reliable method for the evaluation of this risk. This paper presents a complete study of the effect of Ni origin, localization, and soil properties on its availability as assessed with the isotopic exchange kinetics (IEK) method and compares plant response to isotopically exchangeable properties of Ni in soils. We performed IEK on 100 soil samples representing a worldwide range of Ni fate, and concentrations showed that pH was the main influencing parameter and that labile Ni (i.e., isotopically exchangeable Ni, Et) could be reasonably well assessed by a single diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid extraction. The identification of the soil mineral phases that bear Ni (bearing phases) in 16 Ni-rich samples selected among the 100 soils showed a strong effect of the mineralogy of the bearing phases on Ni availability (IEK). Plants with different Ni accumulation strategies all took up Ni from the same labile pool of Ni in four contrasting soils, and the amount taken up by hyperaccumulator plants could be anticipated with the IEK parameters, thus confirming the usefulness of isotopic dilution methods for risk assessment.

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