Get access

Daphnia magna mortality when exposed to titanium dioxide and fullerene (C60) nanoparticles

Authors

  • Sarah B. Lovern,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Great Lakes Water Institute, 600 E. Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Great Lakes Water Institute, 600 E. Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rebecca Klaper

    1. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Great Lakes Water Institute, 600 E. Greenfield Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Nanoparticles (1–100 nm) comprise the latest technological advances designed to do everything from absorb environmental toxins to deliver drugs to a target organ. Recently, however, they have come under scrutiny for the potential to cause environmental damage. Because compounds in this miniature size range have chemical properties that differ from those of their larger counterparts, nanoparticles deserve special attention. Our main objective was to assess the potential impact that nanoparticles may have on release into aquatic environments. We prepared titanium dioxide (TiO2) and fullerene (C60) nanoparticles by filtration in tetrahydrofuran or by sonication. Daphnia magna were exposed to the four solutions using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 48-h acute toxicity tests. Images of the particle solutions were recorded using transmission-electron microscopy, and the median lethal concentration, lowest-observable-effect concentration, and no-observable-effect concentration were determined. Exposure to filtered C60 and filtered TiO2 caused an increase in mortality with an increase in concentration, whereas fullerenes show higher levels of toxicity at lower concentrations. Exposure to the sonicated solutions caused varied mortality. Understanding the potential impacts of nanoparticles will help to identify the most appropriate nanotechnology to preserve the aquatic environment while advancing medical and environmental technology.

Ancillary