Comparison of pressurized liquid extraction and matrix solid-phase dispersion for the measurement of semivolatile organic compound accumulation in tadpoles

Authors

  • Kerri Stanley,

    1. Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, 1007 ALS, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
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  • Staci Massey Simonich,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, 1007 ALS, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    2. Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, 1007 ALS, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    • Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, 1007 ALS, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
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  • David Bradford,

    1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Exposure Research Laboratory Landscape Ecology Branch, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193
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  • Carlos Davidson,

    1. Department of Environmental Studies, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, California 94132, USA
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  • Nita Tallent-Halsell

    1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Exposure Research Laboratory Landscape Ecology Branch, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193
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  • Published on the Web 5/11/2009.

Abstract

Analytical methods capable of trace measurement of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) are necessary to assess the exposure of tadpoles to contaminants as a result of long-range and regional atmospheric transport and deposition. The present study compares the results of two analytical methods, one using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and the other using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD), for the trace measurement of more than 70 SOCs in tadpole tissue, including current-use pesticides. The MSPD method resulted in improved SOC recoveries and precision compared to the PLE method. The MSPD method also required less time, consumed less solvent, and resulted in the measurement of a greater number of SOCs than the PLE method.

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