THE EFFECT OF SELF-RECORDING ON THE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR OF TWO EIGHTH-GRADE STUDENTS

Authors


  • The authors wish to express appreciation to observer Betty Smith and to Kenneth Tewell, Robert Clark, Larry Odom, and Leo Richter of the Bonner Springs, Kansas Public Schools for their complete cooperation in making this study possible. This study is part of the research conducted at the Juniper Gardens Children's Project and is partially supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD-03144-03) Bureau of Child Research and Department of Human Development and Family Life, University of Kansas.

Juniper Gardens Children's Project, 2021 North Third Street, Kansas City, Kansas 66101

Abstract

The effects of self-recording on classroom behavior of two junior high school students was investigated. In the first experiment, study behavior of an eighth-grade girl in history class was recorded. Following baseline observations her counselor provided slips for the girl to record whether or not she studied in class. This resulted in an increase in study. When slips were withdrawn, study decreased and then increased once self-recording was reinstated. After teacher praise for study was increased, self-recording was discontinued without significant losses in study behavior. In the final phase, increased praise was also withdrawn and study remained at a high level. In the second experiment, the number of talk outs emitted by an eighth-grade boy were recorded during math period. Following baseline, slips for recording talk outs were issued for the first half of the period, for the second half, and then for the entire period. Talk outs decreased when self-recording was in effect and increased again when self-recording was discontinued. When self-recording was reinstituted in the final phase there was a slight, though not significant decrease in talking out when compared to the baseline condition.

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