SMALL GROUP BEHAVIORAL TRAINING TO IMPROVE THE JOB INTERVIEW SKILLS REPERTOIRE OF MILDLY RETARDED ADOLESCENTS

Authors

  • Jeffrey A. Kelly,

    Corresponding author
    1. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR, UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER AND JUMP STREET PROGRAM, HUDSPETH RETARDATION CENTER
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Beth G. Wildman,

    1. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR, UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER AND JUMP STREET PROGRAM, HUDSPETH RETARDATION CENTER
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ellen S. Berler

    1. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR, UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER AND JUMP STREET PROGRAM, HUDSPETH RETARDATION CENTER
    Search for more papers by this author

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216.

Abstract

Four retarded adolescents, enrolled in a short-term residential treatment program, received behavioral job interview skills training. Although potentially employable, each was unable to present himself effectively in standard employment interviews. Treatment consisted of a series of behavioral group sessions using instructions, modeling and rehearsal procedures to increase, in multiple baseline fashion, such skills as the adolescents' ability to disclose positive information about their experience and background, convey interest in the position and direct relevant questions to an interviewer. Effectiveness of treatment for each client was assessed by: (1) Objective ratings of performance during individual, structured role-play job interviews following each treatment group; (2) objective ratings of pre- and posttraining performance during tape recorded in vivo generalization job interviews at a fast-food restaurant; and (3) global evaluations of pre- and posttraining in vivo generalization interviews made by experienced personnel interviewers unfamiliar with the nature of the treatment. The results indicated that potentially employable retarded citizens can be successfully taught appropriate job interview behavior using a small group behavioral procedure. The need for such techniques in community and rehabilitation centers for retarded citizens and other clinical populations is discussed.

Ancillary