EFFECTS OF POSTING SELF-SET GOALS ON COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL PLAYERS' SKILL EXECUTION DURING PRACTICE AND GAMES

Authors


The Ohio State University, Sport and Exercise Education, 309 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210-1221 (e-mail: ward.116@osu.edu)

Abstract

The effects of self-set goals and public posting on athletic performance of 5 collegiate football players was studied. All players were linebackers on a National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Division II football team. The dependent variables were the percentage of correct occasions when the linebacker (a) positioned himself to cover a specified area on the field during a pass or from the line of scrimmage during a run; (b) moved to the correct position in response to the positioning of the offense; and (c) tackled and stopped the progress of the ball carrier. A multiple baseline design across behaviors showed an immediate increase in the practice performance of the players and a corresponding increase in game performance following introduction of the independent variable. This study extends research using public posting in sport by demonstrating the effects of player-determined goals and public posting of goal attainment.

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