COMPARING THE TEACHING INTERACTION PROCEDURE TO SOCIAL STORIES FOR PEOPLE WITH AUTISM

Authors


  • This investigation was conducted to meet, in part, the requirements for the doctoral degree in Behavioral Psychology at the University of Kansas. We thank Sarah Johnson for her work throughout the project. We also thank Keith Miller, Nancy Brady, and Matthew Reese for their help on an earlier version of this study.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Justin B. Leaf, 200 Marina Drive, Seal Beach, California 90807 (e-mail: Jblautpar@aol.com).

Abstract

This study compared social stories and the teaching interaction procedure to teach social skills to 6 children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder. Researchers taught 18 social skills with social stories and 18 social skills with the teaching interaction procedure within a parallel treatment design. The teaching interaction procedure resulted in mastery of all 18 skills across the 6 participants. Social stories, in the same amount of teaching sessions, resulted in mastery of 4 of the 18 social skills across the 6 participants. Participants also displayed more generalization of social skills taught with the teaching interaction procedure to known adults and peers.

Ancillary