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THE UTILITY OF ASSESSING MUSICAL PREFERENCE BEFORE IMPLEMENTATION OF NONCONTINGENT MUSIC TO REDUCE VOCAL STEREOTYPY

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Marc J. Lanovaz, École de Psychoéducation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada (e-mail: marc.lanovaz@umontreal.ca).

Abstract

We conducted a modified paired-choice preference assessment and used a multielement design to examine the effects of noncontingent access to high- and low-preference music on vocal stereotypy exhibited by children with autism. For 3 of the 4 participants, high-preference music (a) produced lower levels of vocal stereotypy than low-preference music and (b) reduced vocal stereotypy when compared to a no-interaction condition. Results underscore the potential importance of assessing musical preference prior to using noncontingent music to reduce vocal stereotypy.

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