TEACHING SELF-CONTROL WITH QUALITATIVELY DIFFERENT REINFORCERS

Authors


Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Matt Tincani, Department of Psychological, Organizational, and Leadership Studies, Temple University, College of Education, 1301 Cecil B. Moore Ave., Ritter Hall 365, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (e-mail: tincani@temple.edu).

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of using qualitatively different reinforcers to teach self-control to an adolescent boy who had been diagnosed with an intellectual disability. First, he was instructed to engage in an activity without programmed reinforcement. Next, he was instructed to engage in the activity under a two-choice fixed-duration schedule of reinforcement. Finally, he was exposed to self-control training, during which the delay to a more preferred reinforcer was initially short and then increased incrementally relative to the delay to a less preferred reinforcer. Self-control training effectively increased time on task to earn the delayed reinforcer.

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