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Keywords:

  • September 11;
  • 2001;
  • disasters;
  • health consequences of disasters;
  • medical preparedness;
  • recovery and training;
  • disparities;
  • individuals with disabilities

Abstract

Since 2001 preparedness to respond to the threats and hazards encountered in our daily life is becoming common practice. Disasters, either natural or human made, happen unexpectedly and can cause destruction, especially when threats and risks are ignored. Significant progress has been made in community preparedness, in the U.S. and globally. Yet populations experiencing health and economic disparities have an especially difficult time recovering from disasters and are likely to suffer long-term health consequences disproportionately. Medical policies and practices targeting these groups should be researched, validated and deployed.