Species diversity, niche metrics and species associations in harvested and undisturbed bogs

Authors

  • Antonella Soro,

    1. Department of Plant Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Villavägen 14, SE-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
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    • Universität Tübingen, Botanisches Institut, Auf der Morgenstelle 1, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany

  • Sebastian Sundberg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Villavägen 14, SE-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
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  • Håkan Rydin

    1. Department of Plant Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Villavägen 14, SE-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
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*Corresponding author; Fax +4618553419; E-mail sebastian.sundberg@vaxtbio.uu.se

Abstract

Abstract. Competition is considered an important force in structuring plant communities and in governing niche relations, but communities recovering from disturbance, may be less governed by species interactions and less orderly organized. To address this issue, we studied species richness, abundance and patterns of association between plant species at three spatial scales (1 m2, 1/25 m2, 1/625 m2) in two ombrotrophic mires in east-central Sweden. One was at a secondary successional stage following peat extraction 50 yr ago and the other was undisturbed. Peat extraction leads to a change in hydrology which is slowly restored by the formation of new peat. Niche breadth and niche overlap along the gradient of height above the water table were calculated for the five common Sphagnum species occurring at both mires in an attempt to better understand differences in species co-occurrence at each mire.

Species cover differed between the mires, and the number of species per plot was higher in the undisturbed community at all scales, suggesting that the degree of species intermingling was greater than at the harvested site. At all scales, the number of non-random associations was higher, and niche overlap lower among ecologically similar species (e.g. hollow Sphagnum species) in the undisturbed mire. These differences indicate that random events are important in colonization, and that biotic interactions between neighbours later result in a higher degree of non-randomness.

In addition, we surveyed a number of abandoned peat pit sites to test the effect of disturbance for species composition at a regional scale. Ombrotrophic peat pits contained several Sphagnum species normally associated with minerotrophic mires, and species of wooded mires occurred frequently in peat pits, making them more species-rich than undisturbed bogs. There were also Sphagnum species new to, or rare in, this part of Sweden which indicates effective long-distance dispersal. Even 50 yr after peat extraction had ceased, the vegetation had not recovered to its original composition.

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