Use of a Deep Polypropylene Suture during Earlobe Repair: A Method to Provide Permanent Reinforcement in the Prevention of Recurrent Earlobe Tract Elongation

Authors

  • Joseph F. Greco MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Dermatology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      Address correspondence to: Joseph F. Greco, MD, Department of Dermatology, Drexel University College of Medicine, 219 North Broad Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, or e-mail: josephfgreco@hotmail.com.
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  • Christine S. Stanko MD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Steven S. Greenbaum MD

    1. Skin and Laser Surgery Center of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Address correspondence to: Joseph F. Greco, MD, Department of Dermatology, Drexel University College of Medicine, 219 North Broad Street, 4th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, or e-mail: josephfgreco@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Background. Cosmetic repair of elongated or lacerated earlobe tracts is a commonly encountered dermatologic procedure. For esthetic purposes, patients may choose to repierce the repaired lobe over the original site. Subsequent piercing within a scarred area potentially increases the risk of recurrent tract elongation secondary to the reduced tensile strength of the scar.

Objective. To strengthen a damaged earlobe by incorporating a nonabsorbable, dermal polypropylene suture during earlobe repair.

Methods. The technique is described within the text.

Results. A deep polypropylene suture placed within a repaired earlobe tract provides a permanent barrier above which repiercing can be performed.

Conclusion. Permanent reinforcement of the repaired earlobe serves to reduce the possibility of recurrent elongation of the earlobe tract. The technique is relevant when repeat piercing is desired over the original site.

JOSEPH F. GRECO, MD, CHRISTINE S. STANKO, MD, AND STEVEN S. GREENBAUM, MD, HAVE INDICATED NO SIGNIFICANT INTEREST WITH COMMERCIAL SUPPORTERS.

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