Polysaccharide storage myopathy in the M. longissimus lumborum of showjumpers and dressage horses with back pain

Authors

  • E. QUIROZ-ROTHE,

    1. Laboratory of Muscular Biopathology, Department of Comparative Anatomy and Pathological Anatomy, Cordoba, Spain
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  • M. NOVALES,

    1. Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain
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  • E. AGUILERA-TEJERO,

    1. Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain
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  • J. L. L. RIVERO

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Muscular Biopathology, Department of Comparative Anatomy and Pathological Anatomy, Cordoba, Spain
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    • 2

      Universidad de Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio de Sanidad Animal, Crtra. Madrid a Cádiz, km 396, 14014 Córdoba, Spain


Laboratory of Muscular Biopathology, Department of Comparative Anatomy and Pathological Anatomy, Cordoba, Spain

Summary

This study was designed to investigate whether horses with clinical signs of back pain due to suspected soft tissue injuries were affected by polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). Diagnosis of PSSM in muscle biopsies obtained from the M. longissimus lumborum of 5 showjumpers and 4 dressage horses with a history of back pain is reported. M. longissimus lumborum biopsies of these horses were characterised histopathologically and in 3/9 cases also by electron microscopy. Observations were compared with M. gluteus biopsies of the same horses, and with M. gluteus biopsies obtained from 6 Standardbreds with recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis and from 6 healthy trotters. M. longissimus biopsies from horses with back pain showed pathognomonic signs of PSSM, i.e. high glycogen and/or abnormal complex amylase-resistant polysaccharide deposits. Similar features were found in M. gluteus biopsies of the same horses. Sections of horses with rhabdomyolysis had increased PAS stain when compared with healthy horses, but did not show amylase-resistant material. Qualitative observations were corroborated by quantitative histochemistry (optical densities) of sections stained with PAS and amylase PAS. This study demonstrated the presence of PSSM in the M. longissimus of showjumpers and dressage horses with back pain and indicates that epaxial muscle biopsy is an option in diagnosing back problems in horses when clinical examination and imaging techniques do not provide a precise diagnosis.

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