In vitro effects of lidocaine on the contractility of equine jejunal smooth muscle challenged by ischaemia-reperfusion injury

Authors

  • M. GUSCHLBAUER,

    1. Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover; and Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. HOPPE,

    1. Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover; and Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • F. GEBUREK,

    1. Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover; and Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. FEIGE,

    1. Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover; and Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. HUBER

    1. Department of Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover; and Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author

Summary

Reasons for performing study: Post operative ileus (POI) in horses is a severe complication after colic surgery. A commonly used prokinetic drug is lidocaine, which has been shown to have stimulatory effects on intestinal motility. The cellular mechanisms through which lidocaine affects smooth muscle activity are not yet known.

Objectives: To examine the effects of lidocaine on smooth muscle in vitro and identify mechanisms by which it may affect the contractility of intestinal smooth muscle.

Hypothesis: Ischaemia and reperfusion associated with intestinal strangulation can cause smooth muscle injury. Consequently, muscle cell functionality and contractile performance is decreased. Lidocaine can improve basic cell functions and thereby muscle cell contractility especially in ischaemia-reperfusion-challenged smooth muscle.

Methods: To examine the effects of lidocaine on smooth muscle function directly, isometric force performance was measured in vitro in noninjured and in vivo ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle tissues. Dose-dependent response of lidocaine was measured in both samples. To assess membrane permeability as a marker of basic cell function, release of creatine kinase (CK) was measured by in vitro incubations.

Results: Lidocaine-stimulated contractility of ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle was more pronounced than that of noninjured smooth muscle. A 3-phasic dose-dependency was observed with an initial recovery of contractility especially in ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle followed by a plateau phase where contractility was maintained over a broad concentration range. CK release was decreased by lidocaine.

Conclusion: Lidocaine may improve smooth muscle contractility and basic cell function by cellular repair mechanisms which are still unknown. Improving contractility of smooth muscle after ischaemia-reperfusion injury is essential in recovery of propulsive intestinal motility.

Potential relevance: Characterisation of the cellular mechanisms of effects of lidocaine, especially on ischaemia-reperfusion injured smooth muscle, may lead to improved treatment strategies for horses with POI.

Ancillary