An integrated brief intervention to address smoking in pregnancy

Authors

  • JACQUELINE A. BOWDEN,

    1. Tobacco Control Research and Evaluation Program, Cancer Council South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • DEBRA A. OAG,

    1. Quit SA, Cancer Council South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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  • KATE L. SMITH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Tobacco Control Research and Evaluation Program, Cancer Council South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
      Kate L. Smith, Cancer Council South Australia, Tobacco Control Research & Evaluation Program, PO Box 929, Unley, 5061 Australia. E-mail: ksmith@cancersa.org.au
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  • CAROLINE L. MILLER

    1. Cancer Control Programs, Cancer Council South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    2. University of Adelaide, School of Population Health and Clinical Practice, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
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Kate L. Smith, Cancer Council South Australia, Tobacco Control Research & Evaluation Program, PO Box 929, Unley, 5061 Australia. E-mail: ksmith@cancersa.org.au

Abstract

Objective. Evaluate the impact of an integrated brief intervention to assist antenatal staff in addressing smoking with pregnant women. Design. Three studies were conducted: (a) antenatal staff surveys pre- and post-training to deliver the brief intervention; (b) retrospective audit of pregnancy records; (c) post-intervention follow-up interviews with a cohort of pregnant women who smoked at baseline. Setting. South Australia. Sample. (a) Antenatal health professionals at two major birthing hospitals (n = 117 pre-survey and n = 62 post-survey); (b) 1,024 pregnancy records; (c) follow-up interviews with women at one month (n = 58), 6 months (n = 40) and 12 months (n = 31) post-intervention. Methods. (a) Staff surveys about current practice prior to training (via written questionnaire) and 12 months post-training (by telephone); (b) pregnancy record audit for presence and use of the Smoke-Free Assessment & Intervention Form (SFA&IF) conducted at 12 months; (c) telephone surveys assessing smoking behavior. Main Outcome Measures. Staff practice change and compliance with the intervention. Cessation rates among pregnant women. Results. At 12 months, 89% of staff reported that the intervention integrated well into their work; The SFA&IF was physically present in 80% of pregnancy records and 89% had been completed. Over 65% of current smokers were offered advice about the benefits of quitting; quit rates were highest at 6 months (18, 13% conservative estimate), but women tended to relapse after the birth of their baby. Conclusions. The intervention was well-received and staff compliance was high. Quit rates exceeded spontaneous quit rates in the community. This project has been expanded nationally.

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