ACID- AND ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN AMNIOTIC FLUID IN NORMAL AND COMPLICATED PREGNANCY

Authors

  • Gunhild Beckman,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
    2. Department of Medical Genetics, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Lars Beckman,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
    2. Department of Medical Genetics, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Tord Löfstrand

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
    2. Department of Medical Genetics, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
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Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Karnsjukhuset S-54101 Skovde Sweden

Abstract

Abstract. 171 samples of amniotic fluid were obtained by abdominal amniocentesis from 67 women with complicated pregnancies (isoimmunization, diabetes mellitus or toxaemia). The levels of heat-labile alkaline phosphatase (HLAP), heat-stable alkaline phosphatase (HSAP) and acid phosphatase (AcP) were determined and compared to the enzyme levels in 179 samples from women with normal pregnancies of corresponding gestational ages. HLAP showed two “peaks” of activity, one in the 15th–22nd week and the other at term. HSAP and AcP showed increased activity at term. HSAP was decreased (p<0.01) in isoimmunization between the 36th and 40th week. 11 cases of toxaemia with placental insufficiency showed no differences in the levels of HLAP and HSAP compared with normal pregnancy. AcP showed no differences between normal and complicated pregnancy. Samples contaminated by blood showed no significant increase in the acid- and alkaline phosphatase levels. Samples contaminated by meconium showed a complex pattern. Some samples had normal enzyme levels, some had high levels of HLAP only and some had high levels of HSAP and AcP. The origin of the enzymes is not known with certainty. HSAP in amniotic fluid is most likely not of placental but of intestinal origin. Determinations of acid- and alkaline phosphatase in amniotic fluid seem to be of little value in the clinical management of complicated pregnancy.

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