History of preeclampsia is not associated with an increased risk of thyroid dysfunction

Authors


Jasper J. van Doormaal, Department of Internal Medicine, AA41, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30,001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands. E-mail: j.j.van.doormaal@int.umcg.nl

Abstract

Objective. We evaluated the thyroid function in women with a history of preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome at least 2 years after delivery. Design. Observational retrospective study. Setting. University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands. Population. Women with a history of preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome (n = 310) or uncomplicated pregnancies (n = 363), between January 1990 and February 2003. Methods. Measurement of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels and antibodies to thyroid peroxidase and the use of a questionnaire about relevant history and family history of auto-immune diseases related to thyroid disease. Main outcome measures. Prevalence of primary thyroid dysfunction and antibodies to thyroid peroxidase. Results. Mean serum TSH values were not significantly different between the preeclampsia and control group (1.62 vs. 1.80 mU/l). The percentage of women who have (have had) hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, respectively, did not differ significantly between the preeclampsia and the control group (3.3 vs. 6.1% and 10.0 vs. 7.7%). Furthermore the prevalence of antibodies to thyroid peroxidase was not significantly different (6.1 vs. 7.7%). Conclusion. Preeclampsia and/or HELLP syndrome are not associated with an increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in later life.

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