Human placental lactogen and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in first trimester and subsequent fetal growth

Authors


†Ultrasound Laboratory, Glostrup Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark

Abstract

Objective. To study in an optimized design the possible relation between serum levels in weeks 8-14 of human placental lactogen and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and fetal size at delivery.

Methods. Analysis of data from 93 normal singleton pregnancies. Gestational age was assessed from a sonographic crown-rump length measurement. Serum levels of human placental lactogen and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A were determined by radioimmunoassay, and were expressed in multiples of mean. The relative birth weight was used as an index of fetal growth.

Results. Serum levels of human placental lactogen and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A showed a negative correlation to gestational age at delivery (p<0.01 andp<0.05, respectively), and there was a positive correlation between the serum level of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and relative birth weight (p<0.02).

Conclusions. Higher levels of human placental lactogen and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A predicted earlier delivery, maybe because of better fetal growth, and higher levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A predicted better fetal growth.

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