Application of Nanotechnology in Cancer Therapy and Imaging

Authors

  • Dr. Xu Wang PhD,

    1. Wang is Research Associate, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Lily Yang MD,

    1. Yang is Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Zhuo (Georgia) Chen PhD,

    1. Chen is Associate Professor, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Dong M. Shin MD

    1. Shin is Professor, Department of Hematology and Oncology and Otolaryngology; Director, Clinical and Translational Cancer Prevention Program; Co-Director, Translational Lung Aerodigestive Tract Malignancies Program; and Associate Director of Academic Development, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
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  • Published online through CA First Look at http://CAonline.AmCancerSoc.org.

  • Disclosures: Dr. Shin was supported by NCI P50 CA128613, R01 CA 112643, U01 CA 101244, and U54 CA 119338. Dr. Shin and Dr. Chen both received the Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar Award.

Abstract

Recent developments in nanotechnology have provided researchers with new tools for cancer imaging and treatment. This technology has enabled the development of nanoscale devices that can be conjugated with several functional molecules simultaneously, including tumor-specific ligands, antibodies, anticancer drugs, and imaging probes. Since these nanodevices are 100 to 1,000-fold smaller than cancer cells, they can be easily transferred through leaky blood vessels and interact with targeted tumor-specific proteins both on the surface of and inside cancer cells. Therefore, their application as cancer cell-specific delivery vehicles will be a significant addition to the currently available armory for cancer therapeutics and imaging.

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