Cancer Statistics, 2009

Authors

  • Ahmedin Jemal DVM, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Strategic Director, Cancer Surveillance, Surveillance and Health Policy Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Surveillance and Health Policy Research, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams Street, NW, Atlanta, GA 30303-1002
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  • Rebecca Siegel MPH,

    1. Manager, Surveillance Information Services, Surveillance and Health Policy Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Elizabeth Ward PhD,

    1. Vice President, Surveillance and Health Policy Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Yongping Hao PhD,

    1. Senior Epidemiologist, Surveillance and Health Policy Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • Jiaquan Xu MD,

    1. Epidemiologist, Mortality Statistics Branch, Division of Vital Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland
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  • Michael J. Thun MD, MS

    1. Vice President Emeritus, Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia
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  • DISCLOSURES: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  • Available online at http://cajournal.org and http://cacancerjournal.org

Abstract

Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival based on incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. Incidence and death rates are standardized by age to the 2000 United States standard million population. A total of 1,479,350 new cancer cases and 562,340 deaths from cancer are projected to occur in the United States in 2009. Overall cancer incidence rates decreased in the most recent time period in both men (1.8% per year from 2001 to 2005) and women (0.6% per year from 1998 to 2005), largely because of decreases in the three major cancer sites in men (lung, prostate, and colon and rectum [colorectum]) and in two major cancer sites in women (breast and colorectum). Overall cancer death rates decreased in men by 19.2% between 1990 and 2005, with decreases in lung (37%), prostate (24%), and colorectal (17%) cancer rates accounting for nearly 80% of the total decrease. Among women, overall cancer death rates between 1991 and 2005 decreased by 11.4%, with decreases in breast (37%) and colorectal (24%) cancer rates accounting for 60% of the total decrease. The reduction in the overall cancer death rates has resulted in the avoidance of about 650,000 deaths from cancer over the 15-year period. This report also examines cancer incidence, mortality, and survival by site, sex, race/ethnicity, education, geographic area, and calendar year. Although progress has been made in reducing incidence and mortality rates and improving survival, cancer still accounts for more deaths than heart disease in persons younger than 85 years of age. Further progress can be accelerated by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population and by supporting new discoveries in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2009;59:225-249. ? 2009 American Cancer Society, Inc.

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