Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy

From cancer treatment to survivorship

Authors

  • Joel B. Epstein DMD, MSD, FRCD(C), FDS RCS (Edin),

    Corresponding author
    1. Director, Oral Medicine, Adjunct Professor, Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, City of Hope, Duarte, CA
    • Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, City of Hope, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA 91010
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  • Juliette Thariat MD, PhD,

    1. Radiation Oncologist, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centre Antoine Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, France
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  • Rene-Jean Bensadoun MD, HDR,

    1. Professor and Head, Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine of Poitiers, Poitiers, France
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  • Andrei Barasch DMD, MDSc,

    1. Chairman, Department of Dental Medicine, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY
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  • Barbara A. Murphy MD,

    1. Professor of Medicine, Director, Cancer Supportive Care Program, Director, Head and Neck Research Program, Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN
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  • Leanne Kolnick MD,

    1. Fellow, Hematology/Oncology Division, Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN
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  • Leslie Popplewell MD,

    1. Staff Physician, Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope, Duarte, CA
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  • Ellie Maghami MD, FACS

    1. Section Head, Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, City of Hope, Duarte, CA
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  • We would like to thank Nicola Solomon, PhD, for editorial assistance and critical review of the article.

  • DISCLOSURES: Dr. Epstein serves on the Speakers Bureau for Swedish Orphan Biovitrum (SOBI).

Abstract

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Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time. CA Cancer J Clin 2012. © 2012 American Cancer Society.

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