American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines

Authors

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines Volume 64, Issue 6, 445, Article first published online: 25 August 2014

  • DISCLOSURES: Supported in part by Cooperative Agreement #5U55DP003054 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Skolarus is supported by VA HSR&D Career Development Award - 2 (CDA 12-171) for work outside of the current study and has acted as a paid consultant for ArborMetrix, Inc, to support a prostate cancer-related grant submission in 2013 outside of the current study. Ms. Erb reports cooperative agreement funding from the American Cancer Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center project, from which her salary is paid. Dr. Zelefsky is Editor-in-Chief of Brachytherapy, for which he receives an annual honorarium. He has also acted as a paid consultant for Mick RadioNuclear for work performed outside of the current study. Dr. Aragon-Ching reports personal fees from Amgen as a member of the Advisory Board for Denosumab (metastatic indication) and fees from Sanofi-Aventis, Janssen, and Astellas/Medivation as part of their Speakers Bureaus, for work performed outside of the current study. Dr. Wittmann owns Pfizer stock. Dr. Chodak reports being a paid speaker for Actavis Pharmaceuticals and Astellas Pharmaceuticals for work performed outside of the current study. Ms. Pratt-Chapman is the Director of a sub-grant that the American Cancer Society provides to the George Washington Cancer Institute and reports cooperative agreement funding from the American Cancer Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the conduct of the current study as well as grants from Pfizer Inc/Pfizer Foundation Global Health Partnerships Program for work performed outside of the current study. Ms. Cowens-Alvarado reports cooperative agreement funding from the American Cancer Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center project in which she serves as Principal Investigator; however, her salary is solely funded through American Cancer Society funds. The remaining authors report no conflicts of interest.

  • In addition to the authors of the current article, the American Cancer Society would like to thank the following members of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Expert Workgroup for their contribution to the development of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines: Lisa C. Campbell, PhD (Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Paul A. Godley, MD, PhD, MPP (Professor, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC); Carol Garlinghouse, RN, MSN (Nurse Consultant, Michigan Public Health Institute, Lansing, MI); and Katherine Sharpe, MTS (Vice President, Health Systems, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA). The American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Expert Workgroup would like to thank the following individuals for their helpful review and comments on this article: Alan B. Astrow, MD (Director, Hematology/Medical Oncology, Maimonides Cancer Center, Brooklyn, NY); Lewis E. Foxhall, MD (Vice President, Health Policy, Ofc/EVP Physician-in-Chief; Professor, Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX); Ted Gansler, MBA, MD, MPH (Director, Medical Content, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA); Kevin C. Oeffinger, MD (Member and Attending Director, Adult Long-term Follow-Up Program, Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY); Thomas K. Oliver (Director, Guidelines, Quality and Guidelines, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA); Steven R. Patierno, PhD (Deputy Director, Duke Cancer Institute; Professor of Medicine; Pharmacology and Cancer Biology; and Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC); Andrew C. Peterson, MD (Associate Professor of Urologic Surgery, Urology Residency Program Director, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC); and Richard Wender, MD (Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA).

  • See related article Prostate cancer survivorship guidelines

Abstract

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Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases. CA Cancer J Clin 2014;64:225–249. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

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