SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • 1
    American Cancer Society. Guidelines for the cancer-related checkup: Recommendations and rationale. CA Cancer J Clin 1980; 30: 450.
  • 2
    Fink D: Guidelines for the cancer-related checkup. Atlanta, American Cancer Society, 1991.
  • 3
    Rimer BK, Bluman LG: The psychosocial consequences of mammography. J Natl Cancer Inst Monog 1997; 22: 131138.
  • 4
    Dodd GD: American Cancer Society guidelines on screening for breast cancer: An overview. Cancer 1992; 69 (7 Suppl): 18857.
  • 5
    Leitch AM, et al: American Cancer Society guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer: Update 1997. CA Cancer J Clin 1997; 47: 150153.
  • 6
    Smith RA: Breast cancer screening guidelines. Womens Health Issues. 1992; 2: 212217.
  • 7
    Tabar L, et al: Efficacy of breast cancer screening by age: New results from the Swedish Two-County Trial. Cancer 1995; 75: 25072517.
  • 8
    Tabar L, et al: Tumour development, histology and grade of breast cancers: Prognosis and progression. Int J Cancer 1996; 66: 413419.
  • 9
    Hendrick RE, et al: Benefit of screening mammography in women aged 40–49: A new meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 1997; 22: 8792.
  • 10
    Tabar L, et al: The natural history of breast carcinoma: What have we learned from screening? Cancer 1999; 86: 449462.
  • 11
    Tabar L, et al: Recent results from the Swedish Two-County Trial: The effects of age, histologic type, and mode of detection on the efficacy of breast cancer screening. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 1997; 22: 4347.
  • 12
    Swedish Cancer Society and the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Breast cancer screening with mammography in women aged 40–49 years. Int J Cancer 1996; 68: 693699.
  • 13
    Bassett L, et al: Quality Determinants of Mammography. Clinical Practice Guideline No. 13. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1994; 1994.
  • 14
    Burke W, et al: Recommendations for follow-up care of individuals with an inherited predisposition to cancer: I. Hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer: Cancer Genetics Studies Consortium. JAMA 1997; 277: 915919.
  • 15
    Breslow L: A history of cancer control in the US with emphasis on the period 1946–1971. Los Angeles: University of California at Los Angeles School of Public Health; 1977.
  • 16
    Morrison AS: Screening in Chronic Disease, ed. 2. New York, Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • 17
    Cox JT, et al: Human papillomavirus testing by hybrid capture appears to be useful in triaging women with a cytologic diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1995; 172: 946954.
  • 18
    Cuzick J, et al: Human papillomavirus testing in primary cervical screening. Lancet 1995; 345: 15331536.
  • 19
    Kiviat NB, et al: Prevalence and cytologic manifestations of human papilloma virus (HPV) types 6. 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 42, 43, 44, 45, 51, 52, and 56 among 500 consecutive women. Int J Gynecol Pathol 1992; 11: 197203.
  • 20
    Koutsky LA, et al: A cohort study of the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or 3 in relation to papillomavirus infection. N Engl J Med 1992; 327: 12721278.
  • 21
    Schneider A, Koutsky LA: Natural history and epidemiological features of genital HPV infection. IARC Sci Publ 1992; 119: 2552.
  • 22
    van Muyden RC, et al: Detection and typing of human papillomavirus in cervical carcinomas in Russian women: A prognostic study. Cancer 1999; 85: 20112016.
  • 23
    Jenkins D, Sherlaw-Johns on C, Gallivan S: Assessing the role of HPV testing in cervical cancer screening. Papilloma Report. 1998; 9: 89101.
  • 24
    Franco EL, Rohan TE, Villa LL: Epidemiologic evidence and human papillomavirus infection as a necessary cause of cervical cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1999; 91: 506511.
  • 25
    Walboomers JM, et al: Human papillomavirus is a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer worldwide. J Pathol 1999; 189: 1219.
  • 26
    American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society Guideline for the cancer-related checkup: An update. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 1993.
  • 27
    Shingleton HM, et al: The current status of the Papanicolaou smear. CA Cancer J Clin 1995; 45: 305320.
  • 28
    US Preventive Services Task Force. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, ed. 2. Baltimore. Williams & Wilkins, 1996.
  • 29
    American College of Physicians: Screening for cervical cancer. In: Eddy DM (ed) Common screening tests. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians, 1991.
  • 30
    Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. The Canadian Guide to Clinical Preventive Health Care. Ottawa, Health Canada. 1994.
  • 31
    Eifel PJ, Berek JS, Thigpen JT: Cancer of the cervix, vagina, and vulva. In: Devita VT Jr, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds) Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, ed. 5. Philadelphia, Lippincott-Raven, 1997.
  • 32
    Gefeller O, Windeler J: Risk factors for cervical cancer: Comments on attributable risk calculations and the evaluation of screening in case-control studies. Int J Epidemiol 1991; 20: 11401143.
  • 33
    Nakagawa S, et al: Type of human papillomavirus is related to clinical features of cervical carcinoma. Cancer 1996; 78: 19351941.
  • 34
    Thomas DB, Ray RM: Oral contraceptives and invasive adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas of the uterine cervix: The World Health Organization Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives. Am J Epidemiol 1996; 144: 281289.
  • 35
    Stephenson RA, Stanford JL: Population-based prostate cancer trends in the United States: Patterns of change in the era of prostate-specific antigen. World J Urol 1997; 15: 331335.
  • 36
    Mettlin CJ, Murphy GP: Why is the prostate cancer death rate declining in the United States? [published erratum appears in Cancer 1998 May 1; 82:1802]. Cancer 1998; 82: 249251.
  • 37
    Mettlin C: Changes in patterns of prostate cancer care in the United States: Results of American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer studies. 1974–1993. Prostate 1997; 32: 221226.
  • 38
    Wang MC, et al: Purification of a human prostate specific antigen. Invest Urol 1979; 17: 159163.
  • 39
    Catalona WJ, et al: Measurement of prostate-specific antigen in serum as a screening test for prostate cancer [published erratum appears in. N Engl J Med 1991; 325: 1324]. N Engl J Med 1991; 324: 11561161.
  • 40
    Mettlin C, et al: The American Cancer Society National Prostate Cancer Detection Project: Findings on the detection of early prostate cancer in 2425 men. Cancer 1991; 67: 29492958.
  • 41
    Ries L, et al: SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1973–1995. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. 1998.
  • 42
    Mettlin CJ, et al: Observations on the early detection of prostate cancer from the American Cancer Society National Prostate Cancer Detection Project. Cancer 1997; 80: 18141817.
  • 43
    Collins MM, Barry MJ: Controversies in prostate cancer screening: Analogies to the early lung cancer screening debate. JAMA 1996; 276: 19761979.
  • 44
    Hall RR: Screening and early detection of prostate cancer will decrease morbidity and mortality from prostate cancer: The argument against. Eur Urol 1996; 29 (suppl 2): 2426.
  • 45
    Albertson PC: Screening for prostate cancer is neither appropriate nor cost-effective. Euro Clin North America 1996; 23: 521530.
  • 46
    Mettlin C, et al: Defining and updating the American Cancer Society guidelines for the cancer-related checkup: Prostate and endometrial cancers. CA Cancer J Clin 1993; 43: 4246.
  • 47
    von Eschenbach A, et al: American Cancer Society guideline for the early detection of prostate cancer: Update 1997. CA Cancer J Clin 1997; 47: 261264.
  • 48
    American College of Physicians. Screening for prostate cancer. Ann Intern Med 1997; 126: 480484.
  • 49
    Young G, St. John J: Selecting an occult blood test for use as a screening tool for large bowel cancer. Front Gastrointest Res 1991; 18: 135156.
  • 50
    Ransohoff DF, Lang CA: Screening for colorectal cancer with the fecal occult blood test: A background paper: American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med 1997; 126: 811822.
  • 51
    Wagner JL, et al: Cost–effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in average-risk adults. In: Young GP, Rozen P, Levin B (eds) Prevention and Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer. Philadelphia, Saunders, 1996.
  • 52
    Winawer SJ, et al: Colorectal cancer screening: Clinical guidelines and rationale [published errata appear in. Gastroenterology 1997; 112:1060 and 1998; 114:625]. Gastroenterology 1997; 112: 594642.
  • 53
    Byers T, et al: American Cancer Society guidelines for screening and surveillance for early detection of colorectal polyps and cancer: Update 1997. CA Cancer J Clin 1997; 47: 154160.
  • 54
    American Academy of Family Physicians. Age charts for the periodic health examination. Kansas City: American Academy of Family Physicians, 1994.
  • 55
    U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, ed. 2. Baltimore. Williams & Wilkins, 1996.
  • 56
    Eddy D: Screening for lung cancer. Philadelphia, American College of Physicians, 1991.
  • 57
    Fontana RS: The Mayo Lung Project: A perspective. Presented at the International Conference on Prevention and Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer Varese, Italy, 1998.
  • 58
    Fontana RS, et al: Screening for lung cancer. A critique of the Mayo Lung Project Cancer 1991; 67 (4 Suppl): 11551164.
  • 59
    Strauss GM: Measuring effectiveness of lung cancer screening: From consensus to controversy and back. Chest 1997; 112 (4 Suppl): 216S228S.
  • 60
    Kramer BS, et al: A National Cancer Institute sponsored screening trial for prostatic, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancers. Cancer 1993; 71 (2 Suppl): 589593.
  • 61
    Henschke CI, et al: Early Lung Cancer Action Project: Overall design and findings from baseline screening. Lancet 1999; 354: 99105.
  • 62
    Wolpaw DR: Early detection in lung cancer: Case finding and screening. Med Clin North Am 1996; 80: 6382.
  • 63
    Horton JA, Romans MC, Cruess DF: Mammography attitudes and usage study, 1992. Womens Health Issues. 1992; 2: 180186.
  • 64
    Smith RA, Haynes S: Barriers to screening for breast cancer. Cancer 1992; 69 (7 Suppl): 19681978.
  • 65
    Rimer BK, et al: Why do some women get regular mammograms? Am J Prev Med 1991; 7: 6974.
  • 66
    National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Screening Consortium. Screening mammography: A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and National Health Interview Survey Studies. JAMA 1990; 264: 5458.
  • 67
    Vernon SW: Participation in colorectal cancer screening: A review. J Natl Cancer Inst 1997; 89: 14061422.
  • 68
    Kiefe CI, et al: Chronic disease as a barrier to breast and cervical cancer screening. J Gen Intern Med 1998; 13: 357365.
  • 69
    Rimer BK: Current use and how to increase mammography screening in women. Surg Oncol Clin N Am 1997; 6: 203211.
  • 70
    Dietrich AJ, et al: Cancer: Improving early detection and prevention: A community practice randomised trial. BMJ 1992; 304: 687691.
  • 71
    Dietrich AJ, Woodruff CB, Carney PA: Changing office routines to enhance preventive care: The preventive GAPS approach. Arch Fam Med 1994; 3: 176183.
  • 72
    Gann P, Melville SK, Luckmann R: Characteristics of primary care office systems as predictors of mammography utilization. Ann Intern Med 1993; 118: 893898.
  • 73
    Garr DR, et al: The effect of routine use of computer-generated preventive reminders in a clinical practice. Am J Prev Med 1993; 9: 5561.
  • 74
    McPhee SJ, et al: Promoting cancer screening: A randomized, controlled trial of three interventions. Arch Intern Med 1989; 149: 18661872.
  • 75
    McPhee SJ, Bird JA, Fordham D, et al: Promoting cancer prevention activities by primary care physicians: Results of a randomized, controlled trial. JAMA 1991; 266: 538544.