American Cancer Society Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cancer: Update of Early Detection Guidelines for Prostate, Colorectal, and Endometrial Cancers: ALSO: Update 2001—Testing for Early Lung Cancer Detection

Authors

  • Dr. Robert A. Smith PhD,

    1. Smith is Director of Cancer Screening in the Department of Cancer Control, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach MD,

    1. von Eschenbach is Director of the Program Center for Genitourinary Cancers at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
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  • Dr. Richard Wender MD,

    1. Wender is Clinical Professor Vice Chairman in the Department of Family Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia PA. Dr. Wender contributed to both the prostate colorectal sections of this article.
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  • Dr. Bernard Levin MD,

    1. Levin is Vice President of Cancer Prevention for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX
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  • Dr. Tim Byers MD,

    1. Byers is Professor of Preventive Medicine in the Department of Preventive Medicine Biometrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver, CO
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  • Dr. David Rothenberger MD,

    1. Rothenberger is Professor Chief Divisions of Colon Rectal Surgery Surgical Oncology, Associate Director for Clinical Research Programs, University of Minnesota Cancer Center, Minneapolis, MN
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  • Dr. Durado Brooks MD,

    1. Brooks is Program Director for Prostate and Colorectal Cancers in the Department of Cancer Control at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. William Creasman MD,

    1. Creasman is J. Marion Sims Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology for the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, SC
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  • Dr. Carmel Cohen MD,

    1. Cohen is a Gynecologic Oncologist and Professor of OB/GYN and Reproductive Science at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York, NY
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  • Dr. Carolyn Runowicz MD,

    1. Runowicz is Professor and Director in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY
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  • Dr. Debbie Saslow MD, PhD,

    1. Saslow is Director of Breast and Cervical Cancers in the Department of Cancer Control at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Vilma Cokkinides PhD,

    1. Cokkinides is the Program Director for Risk Factor Surveillance in the Department of Epidemiology and Research Surveillance at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, GA
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  • Dr. Harmon Eyre MD

    1. Eyre is Executive Vice President for Research and Medical Affairs, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, and Editor in Chief of CA
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    • The ACS expresses its gratitude to the invited Workshop participants whose expertise and hard work provided the basis for the revisions of these guidelines.


Abstract

Updates to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines regarding screening for the early detection of prostate, colorectal, and endometrial cancers, based on the recommendations of recent ACS workshops, are presented. Additionally, the authors review the “cancer-related check-up,” clinical encounters that provide case-finding and health counseling opportunities. Finally, the ACS is issuing an updated narrative related to testing for early lung cancer detection for clinicians and individuals at high risk of lung cancer in light of emerging data on new imaging technologies.

Although it is likely that current screening protocols will be supplanted in the future by newer, more effective technologies, the establishment of an organized and systematic approach to early cancer detection would lead to greater utilization of existing technology and greater progress in cancer control.

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