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Christopher M. Jung, Edward L. Melanson, Emily J. Frydendall, Leigh Perreault, Robert H. Eckel and Kenneth P. Wright Energy expenditure during sleep, sleep deprivation and sleep following sleep deprivation in adult humans The Journal of Physiology 589

Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2010.197517

One of the proposed functions of sleep is to conserve energy. We determined the amount of energy conserved by sleep in humans, how much more energy is expended when missing a night of sleep, and how much energy is conserved during recovery sleep. Findings support the hypothesis that a function of sleep is to conserve energy in humans. Sleep deprivation increased energy expenditure indicating that maintaining wakefulness under bed-rest conditions is energetically costly. Recovery sleep after sleep deprivation reduced energy use compared to baseline sleep suggesting that human metabolic physiology has the capacity to make adjustments to respond to the energetic cost of sleep deprivation. The finding that sleep deprivation increases energy expenditure should not be interpreted that sleep deprivation is a safe or effective strategy for weight loss as other studies have shown that chronic sleep deprivation is associated with impaired cognition and weight gain.

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