Get access
American Journal of Industrial Medicine

Risk factors for worker injury and death from occupational light vehicles crashes in New South Wales (Australia)

Authors

  • Rwth Stuckey MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Medical School, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    • Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Medical School, Monash University Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3032, Australia.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Deborah C. Glass PhD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Medical School, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anthony D. LaMontagne ScD,

    1. McCaughey Centre, VicHealth Centre for the Promotion of Mental Health & Community Wellbeing, School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rory Wolfe PhD,

    1. Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Medical School, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Malcolm R. Sim PhD

    1. Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Medical School, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Rwth Stuckey was employed part-time at the Transport Accident Commission (TAC) as the staff Occupational Health and Safety Adviser. She is also a member of the National Fleet Safety Working Party. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the TAC or the Fleet Safety Working Party.

Abstract

Background/Aim

To identify risk and protective factors for crash casualty outcomes in occupational light vehicles (OLV), a previously under-recognized work context for injuries and fatalities.

Methods

A register-based study was conducted using linked vehicle crash and registration data (n = 13,491) for the Australian state of New South Wales. Univariate and multivariate analyses were undertaken to assess the relationship between casualty outcomes and variables drawn from four domains of potential determinants of severity: user, vehicle, road, and work organization factors.

Results

Nineteen percent of OLV crashes had OLV-user casualties (n = 2,506) and 1% fatalities (n = 34). Adjusted casualty risk factors included tired driver (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5–2.7), no seat belt use (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4–2.3), and excessive speed (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2–1.6). Adjusted fatality risk factors were no seat belt (OR 12.9, 95% CI 4.9–34.3) and high-speed zone crash (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.1–12.3).

Conclusions

OLV users are at risk from both recognized road risks and hazards specific to OLV use. Findings suggest that risk reduction could be improved by the use of safer vehicles, fatigue management, and journey planning. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:931–939, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary