Get access
Small

DNA Origami-Templated Growth of Arbitrarily Shaped Metal Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Robert Schreiber,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susanne Kempter,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stefan Holler,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Verena Schüller,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Daniel Schiffels,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephanie S. Simmel,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Philipp C. Nickels,

    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tim Liedl

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany
    • Department of Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 München, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

3D DNA origami structures are employed to template 1.4 nm gold clusters into desired shapes. The gold clusters are further enlarged with gold ions from solution to form continuously metallized nanoparticles with controllable shapes and dimensions and narrow size distributions. This site-directed metallization constitutes a general and easy route to generate nanodonuts, nanorods, nanocuboids, and more complex structures with high yield and fidelity.

original image
Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary