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Journal logoSTRUCTURAL
CHEMISTRY
ISSN: 2053-2296

True symmetry or pseudosymmetry: 5-amino-1-(4-methyl­phenyl­sulfonyl)-4-pyrazolin-3-one and a comparison with its 1-phenyl­sulfonyl analogue

aChemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt, and bInstitut für Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Postfach 3329, D-38023 Braunschweig, Germany
*Correspondence e-mail: p.jones@tu-bs.de

(Received 30 November 2012; accepted 5 December 2012; online 15 December 2012)

The title compound, C10H11N3O3S, (I), crystallizes as the NH tautomer. The two rings subtend an inter­planar angle of 72.54 (4)°. An intra­molecular hydrogen bond is formed from the NH2 group to a sulfonyl O atom. The mol­ecular packing involves layers of mol­ecules parallel to the bc plane at x ≃ 0, 1 etc., with two classical linear hydrogen bonds (amino–sulfonyl and pyrazoline–carbonyl N—H⋯O) and a further inter­action (amino–sulfonyl N—H⋯O) completing a three-centre system with the intra­molecular contact. The analogous phenyl derivative, (II) [Elgemeie, Hanfy, Hopf & Jones (1998[Elgemeie, G. E. H., Hanfy, N., Hopf, H. & Jones, P. G. (1998). Acta Cryst. C54, 136-138.]). Acta Cryst. C54, 136–138], crystallizes with essentially the same unit cell and packing pattern, but with two independent mol­ecules that differ significantly in the orientation of the phenyl groups. The space group is P21/c for (I) but P21 for (II), which is thus a pseudosymmetric counterpart of (I).

Comment

Recent reports from our laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of a variety of N-sulfonyl­ated heterocycles and other anti­metabolites as anti­plastic agents in a number of experimental murine tumour systems (Elgemeie & Sood, 2006[Elgemeie, G. H. & Sood, S. A. (2006). Synth. Commun. 36, 743-753.]; Elgemeie et al., 2009[Elgemeie, G. H., Zaghary, W. A., Amin, K. A. & Nasr, T. M. (2009). J. Carbohydr. Chem. 28, 161-170.]). These compounds have been shown to cause inhibition of thymidine and uridine incorporation into DNA and RNA, and appear to constitute a new class of anti­metabolites (Elgemeie et al., 2007[Elgemeie, G. H., Elghandour, A. H. & Abd Elaziz, G. W. (2007). Synth. Commun. 37, 2827-2834.]). It was of inter­est to study their stereostructures and evaluate the effects of various structural modifications on their biological activity. Recently, some of our synthesized N-sulfonyl­ated pyrazoles proved to be inhibitors of the enzyme cathepsin B (Myers et al., 2007[Myers, M. C., Napper, A. D., Motlekar, N., Shah, P. P., Chiu, C.-H., Beavers, M. P., Diamond, S. L., Huryn, D. M. & Smith, A. B. III (2007). Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 17, 4761-4766.]). Members of this class, along with functional group analogues, were synthesized in an effort to define the structural requirements for activity. We report here the synthesis and structure of the title compound, (I)[link], an N-sulfonated pyra­zole obtained by intra­molecular cyclization of N′-(2-cyano­acetyl)-4-methylbenzenesulfonohydrazide. Some time ago, we reported the structure of the corresponding 1-phenyl derivative, (II) (Elgemeie et al., 1998[Elgemeie, G. E. H., Hanfy, N., Hopf, H. & Jones, P. G. (1998). Acta Cryst. C54, 136-138.]).

[Scheme 1]

Compound (I)[link] can potentially exist in a different tautomeric (hy­droxy) form. However, spectroscopic studies indicated the presence of the NH tautomer in solution (e.g. the 13C NMR signal at 172.65 p.p.m. indicates a carbonyl C atom rather than a C—OH group). X-ray analysis (Fig. 1[link]) establishes the exclusive presence of the ketonic form in the solid state; all H atoms could be located unambiguously, and bond lengths are also consistent with the NH form. Mol­ecular dimensions (Table 1[link]) may be regarded as normal. Atoms N2 and N3 are pyramidally coordinated; they lie 0.31 (1) and 0.21 (1) Å, respectively, out of the plane of their three substituents. The pyrazoline ring is reasonably planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.04 Å), although its largest absolute torsion angle is N1—N2—C3—C4, −10.30 (11)°. The two rings subtend an inter­planar angle of 72.54 (4)°, and their orientation is further described by the torsion angles C12—C11—S1—O2 = −0.31 (11)° and N2—N1—S1—O3 = −179.59 (7)°. In other words, C12—C11 is synperiplanar to S1—O2, and N1—N2 is anti­periplanar to S1—O3. An intra­molecular N3—H03A⋯O3 hydrogen bond is observed, albeit with a narrow angle of 116.6 (14)° at the H atom; at N3, atoms H03A and H03B lie out of the plane (of the pyrazoline ring plus N3) by 0.28 (2) and 0.25 (2) Å, respectively, both in the opposite direction to atom O3.

The mol­ecular packing of (I)[link] involves thick layers of mol­ecules parallel to the bc plane at x ≃ 0, 1 etc. (Fig. 2[link]); the tolyl groups project into the space between the layers (Fig. 3[link]). In the order shown in Table 2[link], hydrogen bond 1 forms eight-membered rings of the common graph set R22(8) (Bernstein et al., 1995[Bernstein, J., Davis, R. E., Shimoni, L. & Chang, N.-L. (1995). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 34, 1555-1573.]) over an inversion centre, hydrogen bonds 2 and 3 form a three-centre system (2 is the intra­molecular hydrogen bond mentioned above), and hydrogen bond 4 connects the R22(8) rings in the direction of the diagonals [011] and [01[\overline{1}]]. We note that the H03B⋯O2ii [symmetry code: (ii) x, −y + [1 \over 2], z + [1 \over 2]] contact of 2.76 (2) Å would complete a bifurcated hydrogen-bond system with hydrogen bond 3, but we regard it as too long.

Several years ago, we published the structure of the phenyl analogue, (II), of (I)[link] (Elgemeie et al., 1998[Elgemeie, G. E. H., Hanfy, N., Hopf, H. & Jones, P. G. (1998). Acta Cryst. C54, 136-138.]). The unit cells are strikingly similar, except that the a axis of (II) is around 1.2 Å shorter [for (II): a = 10.7794 (19), b = 7.8301 (8) and c = 11.8317 (12) Å, and β = 97.505 (8)°, at 173 K]. The space group of (II) was originally thought to be P21/c, but a more detailed analysis showed that the true space group was P21. The packing diagram of (II) is shown in Fig. 4[link]. The two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit, which are related to each other by a local inversion centre, differ significantly in the orientation of the phenyl rings (Fig. 5[link]), with torsion angles N1—S1—C11—C12 = 109.5 (3) and −73.0 (3)°. The two independent mol­ecules of (II) form an exactly equivalent set of hydrogen bonds to each other and to (I)[link], so that the packing pattern is topologically the same in both structures. Compound (II) is thus a pseudosymmetric counterpart of (I)[link]. The absence of the methyl group leads to the shorter a axis in (II).

[Figure 1]
Figure 1
The mol­ecular structure of (I)[link], showing the atom-numbering scheme. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at the 50% probability level. The dashed line indicates the intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2
A packing diagram for (I)[link], viewed parallel to the a axis. For clarity, the tolyl rings are reduced to the ipso-C atom, and all H atoms not involved in hydrogen bonding have also been omitted. Hydrogen bonds are indicated by thick (two-centre) or thin dashed lines (three-centre) and are numbered according to their order in Table 2[link].
[Figure 3]
Figure 3
A packing diagram for (I)[link], viewed parallel to the b axis. Dashed lines indicate hydrogen bonds.
[Figure 4]
Figure 4
A packing diagram for (II) (Elgemeie et al., 1998[Elgemeie, G. E. H., Hanfy, N., Hopf, H. & Jones, P. G. (1998). Acta Cryst. C54, 136-138.]), viewed parallel to the a axis. The first independent mol­ecule is drawn with full bonds and the second with open bonds. For clarity, phenyl rings are reduced to the ipso-C atom, and all H atoms not involved in hydrogen bonding have also been omitted. Hydrogen bonds are indicated by thick (two-centre) or thin dashed lines (three-centre) and are numbered analogously to those of (I)[link] in Table 2[link], with an additional `a' for those with the donor in mol­ecule 1 and `b' for those with the donor in mol­ecule 2. The origin has been shifted along the b axis to be consistent with Fig. 2[link], but not along the c axis, where it would be shifted by [{1 \over 4}] with respect to (I)[link].
[Figure 5]
Figure 5
A least-squares fit of the two mol­ecules of (II). The r.m.s. deviation for all atoms except the non-ipso atoms of the phenyl ring is 0.06 Å. Mol­ecule 1 (unprimed atoms) was inverted and is shown with dashed bonds.

Experimental

Compound (I)[link] was obtained by refluxing an ethano­lic solution (30 ml) of N′-(2-cyanoacetyl)-4-methylbenzenesulfonohydrazide (2.53 g, 0.01 mol) containing a few drops of piperidine for 1 h. After cooling, the precipitate, (I)[link], was filtered off and recrystallized from ethanol (yield 87%; m.p. 500 K). IR (KBr, ν, cm−1): 3550, 3500, 3420 (NH2, NH), 1630 (C=O, s); 1H NMR (DMSO): δ 2.34 (s, 3H, CH3), 4.48 (s, 1H, CH), 6.88 (s, br, 2H, NH2), 7.41–7.92 (m, 4H, C6H4); MS, m/z = 253. Elemental analysis calculated for C10H11N3O3S: C 47.42, H 4.37, N 16.59, O 18.95, S 12.66%; found: C 47.66, H 4.47, N 16.62, O 19.18, S 12.71%.

Crystal data
  • C10H11N3O3S

  • Mr = 253.28

  • Monoclinic, P 21 /c

  • a = 11.9857 (2) Å

  • b = 7.9094 (2) Å

  • c = 11.6777 (2) Å

  • β = 93.778 (2)°

  • V = 1104.63 (4) Å3

  • Z = 4

  • Mo Kα radiation

  • μ = 0.29 mm−1

  • T = 100 K

  • 0.35 × 0.30 × 0.10 mm

Data collection
  • Oxford Xcalibur Eos diffractometer

  • Absorption correction: multi-scan (CrysAlis PRO; Oxford Diffraction, 2011[Oxford Diffraction (2011). CrysAlis PRO. Oxford Diffraction Ltd, Yarnton, Oxfordshire, England.]) Tmin = 0.962, Tmax = 1.000

  • 55463 measured reflections

  • 3349 independent reflections

  • 3081 reflections with I > 2σ(I)

  • Rint = 0.029

Refinement
  • R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.031

  • wR(F2) = 0.083

  • S = 1.05

  • 3349 reflections

  • 167 parameters

  • H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement

  • Δρmax = 0.44 e Å−3

  • Δρmin = −0.44 e Å−3

Table 1
Selected geometric parameters (Å, °)

O1—C31.2483 (13)
N1—C51.4184 (13)
N1—N21.4188 (12)
N2—C31.3891 (14)
N3—C51.3478 (13)
C3—C41.4284 (14)
C4—C51.3702 (14)
O3—S1—N1—N2−179.59 (7)
C5—N1—N2—C38.76 (11)
N1—N2—C3—C4−10.30 (11)
N2—C3—C4—C57.95 (12)
C3—C4—C5—N1−2.41 (12)
N2—N1—C5—C4−3.86 (11)
O2—S1—C11—C12−0.31 (11)

Table 2
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)

D—H⋯AD—HH⋯ADAD—H⋯A
N2—H02⋯O1i0.891 (17)1.926 (18)2.8153 (12)175.4 (16)
N3—H03A⋯O30.859 (18)2.333 (17)2.8241 (13)116.6 (14)
N3—H03A⋯O2ii0.859 (18)2.512 (17)2.9359 (12)111.3 (13)
N3—H03B⋯O1iii0.859 (18)1.986 (18)2.8322 (12)168.0 (16)
Symmetry codes: (i) -x+2, -y+1, -z; (ii) [x, -y+{\script{1\over 2}}, z+{\script{1\over 2}}]; (iii) [x, -y+{\script{3\over 2}}, z+{\script{1\over 2}}].

The N-bound H atoms were refined freely. The methyl group was refined as an idealized rigid group [C—H = 0.98 Å and H—C—H = 109.5°; Uiso(H) = 1.5Ueq(C)] allowed to rotate but not tip; slow convergence of this group may indicate some degree of rotational disorder. Other H atoms were included using a riding model starting from calculated positions [C—H = 0.95 Å and Uiso(H) = 1.2Ueq(C)].

Data collection: CrysAlis PRO (Oxford Diffraction, 2011[Oxford Diffraction (2011). CrysAlis PRO. Oxford Diffraction Ltd, Yarnton, Oxfordshire, England.]); cell refinement: CrysAlis PRO; data reduction: CrysAlis PRO; program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 2008[Sheldrick, G. M. (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 112-122.]); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008[Sheldrick, G. M. (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 112-122.]); molecular graphics: XP (Siemens, 1994[Siemens (1994). XP. Siemens Analytical X-ray Instruments Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, USA.]); software used to prepare material for publication: SHELXL97.

Supporting information


Comment top

Recent reports from our laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of a variety of N-sulfonylated heterocycles and other antimetabolites as antiplastic agents in a number of experimental murine tumour systems (Elgemeie & Sood, 2006; Elgemeie et al., 2009). These compounds have been shown to cause inhibition of thymidine and uridine incorporation into DNA and RNA, and appear to constitute a new class of antimetabolites (Elgemeie et al., 2007). It was of interest to study their stereostructure and evaluate the effects of various structural modifications on their biological activity. Recently, some of our synthesized N-sulfonylated pyrazoles proved to be inhibitors of the enzyme cathepsin B (Myers et al., 2007). Members of this class, along with functional group analogues, were synthesized in an effort to define the structural requirements for activity. We report here the synthesis and structure of 5-amino-1-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-4-pyrazolin-3-one, (I), an N-sulfonated pyrazole obtained by intramolecular cyclization of cyanoaceto-N-tolylsulfonylhydrazide. Some time ago, we reported the structure of the corresponding 1-phenyl derivative, (II) (Elgemeie et al., 1998).

Compound (I) can potentially exist in a different tautomeric (hydroxy) form. However, spectroscopic studies indicated the presence of the NH tautomer in solution (e.g. the 13C NMR signal at 172.65 p.p.m. indicates a carbonyl C atom rather than a C—OH group). X-ray analysis (Fig. 1) establishes the exclusive presence of the ketonic form in the solid state; all H atoms could be located unambiguously, and bond lengths are also consistent with the NH form. Molecular dimensions (Table 1) may be regarded as normal. Atoms N2 and N3 are pyramidally coordinated; they lie 0.31 (1) and 0.21 (1) Å, respectively, out of the plane of their three substituents. The pyrazoline ring is reasonably planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.04 Å), although its largest absolute torsion angle is N1—N2—C3—C4 = -10.30 (11)°. The two rings subtend an interplanar angle of 72.54 (4)°, and their orientation is further described by the torsion angles C12—C11—S1—O2 = -0.31 (11)° and N2—N1—S1—O3 = -179.59 (7)°. In other words, C12—C11 is synperiplanar to S1—O2, and N1—N2 is antiperiplanar to S1—O3. An intramolecular N3—H03A···O3 hydrogen bond is observed, albeit with a narrow angle of 116.6 (14)° at the H atom; at N3, atoms H03A and H03B lie out of the plane (of the pyrazoline ring plus N3) by 0.28 (2) and 0.25 (2) Å, respectively, both in the opposite direction to atom O3.

The molecular packing of (I) involves thick layers of molecules parallel to the bc plane at x 0, 1 etc. (Fig. 2); the tolyl groups project into the space between the layers (Fig. 3). In the order shown in Table 2, hydrogen bond 1 forms eight-membered rings of the common graph set R22(8) (Bernstein et al., 1995) over an inversion centre, hydrogen bonds 2 and 3 form a three-centre system (2 is the intramolecular hydrogen bond mentioned above), and hydrogen bond 4 connects the R22(8) rings in the direction of the diagonals [011] and [011]. We note that the H03B···O2ii contact of 2.76 (2) Å would complete a bifurcated hydrogen-bond system with hydrogen bond 3, but we regard it as too long.

Several years ago, we published the structure of the phenyl analogue, (II), of (I) (Elgemeie et al., 1998). The unit cells are strikingly similar, except that the a axis of (II) is around 1.2 Å shorter [for (II): a = 10.7794 (19), b = 7.8301 (8) and c = 11.8317 (12) Å, and β = 97.505 (8)°, at 173 K]. The space group of (II) was originally thought to be P21/c, but a more detailed analysis showed that the true space group was P21. The packing diagram of (II) is shown in Fig. 4. The two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit, which are related to each other by a local inversion centre, differ significantly in the orientation of the phenyl rings (Fig. 5), with torsion angles N1—S1—C11—C12 = 109.5 (3) and -73.0 (3)°. The two independent molecules of (II) form an exactly equivalent set of hydrogen bonds to each other and to (I), so that the packing pattern is topologically the same in both structures. Compound (II) is thus a pseudosymmetric counterpart of (I). The absence of the methyl group leads to the shorter a axis in (II).

Related literature top

For related literature, see: Bernstein et al. (1995); Elgemeie & Sood (2006); Elgemeie et al. (1998, 2007, 2009); Myers et al. (2007).

Experimental top

Compound (I) was obtained by refluxing an ethanolic solution [Volume?] of cyanoaceto-N-tolylsulfonylhydrazide [Quantity?] containing a few drops of piperidine for 1 h. After cooling, the precipitate, (I), was filtered off and recrystallized from ethanol (yield 87%; m.p. 500 K). Spectroscopic analysis: IR (KBr, ν, cm-1): 3550, 3500, 3420 (NH2, NH), 1630 (CO, s); 1H NMR (DMSO, δ, p.p.m.): 2.34 (s, 3H, CH3), 4.48 (s, 1H, CH), 6.88 (s, br, 2H, NH2), 7.41–7.92 (m, 4H, C6H4); MS, m/z = 253. Elemental analysis, calculated for C10H11N3O3S: C 47.42, H 4.37, N 16.59, O 18.95, S 12.66%; found: C 47.66, H 4.47, N 16.62, O 19.18, S 12.71%.

Refinement top

The N-bound H atoms were refined freely. The methyl group was refined as an idealized rigid group [C—H = 0.98 Å and H—C—H = 109.5°; Uiso(H) = 1.5Ueq(C)] allowed to rotate but not tip; slow convergence of this group may indicate some degree of rotational disorder. Other H atoms were included using a riding model starting from calculated positions [C—H = 0.95 Å, and Uiso(H) = 1.2Ueq(C)]. [Please check added text]

Computing details top

Data collection: CrysAlis PRO (Oxford Diffraction, 2011); cell refinement: CrysAlis PRO (Oxford Diffraction, 2011); data reduction: CrysAlis PRO (Oxford Diffraction, 2011); program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 2008); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008); molecular graphics: XP (Siemens, 1994); software used to prepare material for publication: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008).

Figures top
Fig. 1. The molecular structure of (I), with the atom-numbering scheme. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at the 50% probability level. The dashed line indicates the intramolecular N—H···O hydrogen bond.

Fig. 2. A packing diagram for (I), viewed parallel to the a axis. For clarity, the tolyl rings are reduced to the ipso-C atom, and all H atoms not involved in hydrogen bonding have also been omitted. Hydrogen bonds are indicated by thick dashed lines (two-centre) or thin dashed lines (three-centre) and are numbered according to their order in Table 2.

Fig. 3. A packing diagram for (I), viewed parallel to the b axis. Dashed lines indicate hydrogen bonds.

Fig. 4. A packing diagram for (II) (Elgemeie et al., 1998), viewed parallel to the a axis. The first independent molecule is drawn with full bonds and the second with open bonds. For clarity, phenyl rings are reduced to the ipso-C atom, and all H atoms not involved in hydrogen bonding have also been omitted. Hydrogen bonds are indicated by thick dashed lines (two-centre) or thin dashed lines (three-centre) and are numbered analogously to those of (I) in Table 2, with an additional `a' for those with the donor in molecule 1 and `b' for those with the donor in molecule 2. The origin has been shifted along the b axis to be consistent with Fig. 2, but not along the c axis, where it would be shifted by 1/4 with respect to (I).

Fig. 5. A least-squares fit of the two molecules of (II). The r.m.s. deviation for all atoms except the non-ipso atoms of the phenyl ring is 0.06 Å. Molecule 1 (unprimed atoms) was inverted and is shown with dashed bonds.
5-Amino-1-(4-methylphenylsulfonyl)-4-pyrazolin-3-one top
Crystal data top
C10H11N3O3SF(000) = 528
Mr = 253.28Dx = 1.523 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 11.9857 (2) ÅCell parameters from 20410 reflections
b = 7.9094 (2) Åθ = 2.4–30.8°
c = 11.6777 (2) ŵ = 0.29 mm1
β = 93.778 (2)°T = 100 K
V = 1104.63 (4) Å3Tablet, colourless
Z = 40.35 × 0.30 × 0.10 mm
Data collection top
Oxford Xcalibur Eos
diffractometer
3349 independent reflections
Radiation source: Enhance (Mo) X-ray Source3081 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.029
Detector resolution: 16.1419 pixels mm-1θmax = 30.9°, θmin = 3.1°
ω scansh = 1717
Absorption correction: multi-scan
(CrysAlis PRO; Oxford Diffraction, 2011)
k = 1111
Tmin = 0.962, Tmax = 1.000l = 1616
55463 measured reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.031Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.083H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.05 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.0375P)2 + 0.8152P]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
3349 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.008
167 parametersΔρmax = 0.44 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.44 e Å3
Crystal data top
C10H11N3O3SV = 1104.63 (4) Å3
Mr = 253.28Z = 4
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation
a = 11.9857 (2) ŵ = 0.29 mm1
b = 7.9094 (2) ÅT = 100 K
c = 11.6777 (2) Å0.35 × 0.30 × 0.10 mm
β = 93.778 (2)°
Data collection top
Oxford Xcalibur Eos
diffractometer
3349 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
(CrysAlis PRO; Oxford Diffraction, 2011)
3081 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.962, Tmax = 1.000Rint = 0.029
55463 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.0310 restraints
wR(F2) = 0.083H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.05Δρmax = 0.44 e Å3
3349 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.44 e Å3
167 parameters
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R-factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
S10.82267 (2)0.20196 (3)0.22306 (2)0.00923 (7)
O10.92704 (7)0.70212 (10)0.02289 (7)0.01415 (16)
O20.86903 (7)0.08937 (10)0.14307 (7)0.01331 (16)
O30.82447 (7)0.15888 (11)0.34220 (7)0.01446 (16)
N10.89922 (7)0.38073 (11)0.21784 (7)0.00910 (16)
N20.90457 (8)0.44047 (12)0.10377 (8)0.01045 (17)
H020.9571 (15)0.390 (2)0.0653 (14)0.021 (4)*
N30.86198 (8)0.50217 (13)0.39905 (8)0.01302 (18)
H03A0.8868 (14)0.410 (2)0.4299 (14)0.020 (4)*
H03B0.8723 (14)0.591 (2)0.4407 (14)0.019 (4)*
C30.90350 (8)0.61599 (14)0.10757 (9)0.01048 (19)
C40.87726 (9)0.66602 (14)0.22022 (9)0.01122 (19)
H40.86220.77790.24460.013*
C50.87772 (8)0.52327 (13)0.28673 (9)0.00963 (18)
C110.68587 (9)0.25427 (14)0.17167 (9)0.01096 (19)
C120.64353 (10)0.18606 (16)0.06803 (10)0.0170 (2)
H120.68890.11660.02370.020*
C130.53346 (10)0.22144 (17)0.03042 (11)0.0198 (2)
H130.50360.17410.03980.024*
C140.46595 (9)0.32476 (16)0.09343 (10)0.0162 (2)
C150.51177 (10)0.39525 (17)0.19568 (11)0.0191 (2)
H150.46740.46840.23850.023*
C160.62106 (10)0.36036 (16)0.23585 (10)0.0167 (2)
H160.65120.40800.30590.020*
C170.34648 (10)0.35846 (19)0.05166 (12)0.0237 (3)
H17A0.29620.29950.10110.036*
H17B0.33370.31760.02730.036*
H17C0.33180.48030.05400.036*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
S10.01033 (12)0.00810 (12)0.00918 (12)0.00069 (8)0.00006 (8)0.00048 (8)
O10.0163 (4)0.0134 (4)0.0132 (4)0.0029 (3)0.0043 (3)0.0053 (3)
O20.0140 (4)0.0107 (4)0.0152 (4)0.0018 (3)0.0001 (3)0.0032 (3)
O30.0184 (4)0.0140 (4)0.0108 (3)0.0033 (3)0.0003 (3)0.0039 (3)
N10.0113 (4)0.0090 (4)0.0071 (4)0.0012 (3)0.0013 (3)0.0004 (3)
N20.0140 (4)0.0103 (4)0.0073 (4)0.0001 (3)0.0028 (3)0.0019 (3)
N30.0189 (5)0.0118 (4)0.0084 (4)0.0025 (3)0.0011 (3)0.0014 (3)
C30.0089 (4)0.0109 (4)0.0117 (4)0.0012 (3)0.0007 (3)0.0015 (4)
C40.0123 (4)0.0096 (4)0.0119 (4)0.0000 (3)0.0022 (4)0.0002 (4)
C50.0086 (4)0.0102 (4)0.0101 (4)0.0009 (3)0.0003 (3)0.0014 (3)
C110.0098 (4)0.0117 (4)0.0113 (4)0.0009 (4)0.0009 (3)0.0000 (4)
C120.0136 (5)0.0218 (6)0.0155 (5)0.0030 (4)0.0008 (4)0.0068 (4)
C130.0146 (5)0.0271 (6)0.0172 (5)0.0020 (4)0.0036 (4)0.0074 (5)
C140.0113 (5)0.0183 (5)0.0188 (5)0.0002 (4)0.0003 (4)0.0006 (4)
C150.0141 (5)0.0235 (6)0.0199 (5)0.0039 (4)0.0027 (4)0.0057 (5)
C160.0144 (5)0.0213 (6)0.0144 (5)0.0012 (4)0.0006 (4)0.0061 (4)
C170.0119 (5)0.0298 (7)0.0288 (6)0.0034 (5)0.0024 (4)0.0018 (5)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
S1—O21.4293 (8)C14—C151.3970 (17)
S1—O31.4313 (8)C14—C171.5057 (16)
S1—N11.6889 (9)C15—C161.3897 (16)
S1—C111.7578 (11)N2—H020.891 (17)
O1—C31.2483 (13)N3—H03A0.859 (18)
N1—C51.4184 (13)N3—H03B0.859 (18)
N1—N21.4188 (12)C4—H40.9500
N2—C31.3891 (14)C12—H120.9500
N3—C51.3478 (13)C13—H130.9500
C3—C41.4284 (14)C15—H150.9500
C4—C51.3702 (14)C16—H160.9500
C11—C121.3901 (15)C17—H17A0.9800
C11—C161.3950 (15)C17—H17B0.9800
C12—C131.3911 (16)C17—H17C0.9800
C13—C141.3938 (17)
O2—S1—O3120.36 (5)C15—C14—C17121.21 (11)
O2—S1—N1105.22 (5)C16—C15—C14121.20 (11)
O3—S1—N1105.12 (5)C15—C16—C11118.95 (10)
O2—S1—C11108.52 (5)C3—N2—H02118.2 (11)
O3—S1—C11109.99 (5)N1—N2—H02113.6 (11)
N1—S1—C11106.70 (5)C5—N3—H03A116.5 (11)
C5—N1—N2106.79 (8)C5—N3—H03B115.2 (11)
C5—N1—S1121.71 (7)H03A—N3—H03B115.2 (15)
N2—N1—S1111.77 (7)C5—C4—H4126.2
C3—N2—N1107.56 (8)C3—C4—H4126.2
O1—C3—N2121.13 (10)C11—C12—H12120.6
O1—C3—C4130.79 (10)C13—C12—H12120.6
N2—C3—C4108.02 (9)C12—C13—H13119.2
C5—C4—C3107.51 (9)C14—C13—H13119.2
N3—C5—C4131.15 (10)C16—C15—H15119.4
N3—C5—N1119.73 (9)C14—C15—H15119.4
C4—C5—N1109.12 (9)C15—C16—H16120.5
C12—C11—C16121.13 (10)C11—C16—H16120.5
C12—C11—S1118.99 (8)C14—C17—H17A109.5
C16—C11—S1119.87 (8)C14—C17—H17B109.5
C11—C12—C13118.75 (11)H17A—C17—H17B109.5
C12—C13—C14121.52 (11)C14—C17—H17C109.5
C13—C14—C15118.42 (11)H17A—C17—H17C109.5
C13—C14—C17120.37 (11)H17B—C17—H17C109.5
O2—S1—N1—C5179.86 (8)S1—N1—C5—C4133.79 (8)
O3—S1—N1—C551.83 (9)O2—S1—C11—C120.31 (11)
C11—S1—N1—C564.97 (9)O3—S1—C11—C12133.86 (10)
O2—S1—N1—N252.38 (8)N1—S1—C11—C12112.62 (10)
O3—S1—N1—N2179.59 (7)O2—S1—C11—C16178.57 (9)
C11—S1—N1—N262.80 (8)O3—S1—C11—C1645.01 (11)
C5—N1—N2—C38.76 (11)N1—S1—C11—C1668.50 (10)
S1—N1—N2—C3144.13 (7)C16—C11—C12—C131.86 (18)
N1—N2—C3—O1167.27 (9)S1—C11—C12—C13177.00 (10)
N1—N2—C3—C410.30 (11)C11—C12—C13—C140.8 (2)
O1—C3—C4—C5169.30 (11)C12—C13—C14—C150.9 (2)
N2—C3—C4—C57.95 (12)C12—C13—C14—C17178.94 (12)
C3—C4—C5—N3177.50 (11)C13—C14—C15—C161.67 (19)
C3—C4—C5—N12.41 (12)C17—C14—C15—C16178.19 (12)
N2—N1—C5—N3176.21 (9)C14—C15—C16—C110.67 (19)
S1—N1—C5—N346.28 (13)C12—C11—C16—C151.14 (18)
N2—N1—C5—C43.86 (11)S1—C11—C16—C15177.71 (10)
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, º) top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N2—H02···O1i0.891 (17)1.926 (18)2.8153 (12)175.4 (16)
N3—H03A···O30.859 (18)2.333 (17)2.8241 (13)116.6 (14)
N3—H03A···O2ii0.859 (18)2.512 (17)2.9359 (12)111.3 (13)
N3—H03B···O1iii0.859 (18)1.986 (18)2.8322 (12)168.0 (16)
Symmetry codes: (i) x+2, y+1, z; (ii) x, y+1/2, z+1/2; (iii) x, y+3/2, z+1/2.

Experimental details

Crystal data
Chemical formulaC10H11N3O3S
Mr253.28
Crystal system, space groupMonoclinic, P21/c
Temperature (K)100
a, b, c (Å)11.9857 (2), 7.9094 (2), 11.6777 (2)
β (°) 93.778 (2)
V3)1104.63 (4)
Z4
Radiation typeMo Kα
µ (mm1)0.29
Crystal size (mm)0.35 × 0.30 × 0.10
Data collection
DiffractometerOxford Xcalibur Eos
diffractometer
Absorption correctionMulti-scan
(CrysAlis PRO; Oxford Diffraction, 2011)
Tmin, Tmax0.962, 1.000
No. of measured, independent and
observed [I > 2σ(I)] reflections
55463, 3349, 3081
Rint0.029
(sin θ/λ)max1)0.722
Refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.031, 0.083, 1.05
No. of reflections3349
No. of parameters167
H-atom treatmentH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å3)0.44, 0.44

Computer programs: CrysAlis PRO (Oxford Diffraction, 2011), SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 2008), SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008), XP (Siemens, 1994).

Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O1—C31.2483 (13)N3—C51.3478 (13)
N1—C51.4184 (13)C3—C41.4284 (14)
N1—N21.4188 (12)C4—C51.3702 (14)
N2—C31.3891 (14)
O3—S1—N1—N2179.59 (7)C3—C4—C5—N12.41 (12)
C5—N1—N2—C38.76 (11)N2—N1—C5—C43.86 (11)
N1—N2—C3—C410.30 (11)O2—S1—C11—C120.31 (11)
N2—C3—C4—C57.95 (12)
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, º) top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N2—H02···O1i0.891 (17)1.926 (18)2.8153 (12)175.4 (16)
N3—H03A···O30.859 (18)2.333 (17)2.8241 (13)116.6 (14)
N3—H03A···O2ii0.859 (18)2.512 (17)2.9359 (12)111.3 (13)
N3—H03B···O1iii0.859 (18)1.986 (18)2.8322 (12)168.0 (16)
Symmetry codes: (i) x+2, y+1, z; (ii) x, y+1/2, z+1/2; (iii) x, y+3/2, z+1/2.
 

References

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First citationElgemeie, G. H., Elghandour, A. H. & Abd Elaziz, G. W. (2007). Synth. Commun. 37, 2827–2834.  Web of Science CrossRef CAS
First citationElgemeie, G. E. H., Hanfy, N., Hopf, H. & Jones, P. G. (1998). Acta Cryst. C54, 136–138.  Web of Science CSD CrossRef CAS IUCr Journals
First citationElgemeie, G. H. & Sood, S. A. (2006). Synth. Commun. 36, 743–753.  Web of Science CrossRef CAS
First citationElgemeie, G. H., Zaghary, W. A., Amin, K. A. & Nasr, T. M. (2009). J. Carbohydr. Chem. 28, 161–170.  Web of Science CrossRef CAS
First citationMyers, M. C., Napper, A. D., Motlekar, N., Shah, P. P., Chiu, C.-H., Beavers, M. P., Diamond, S. L., Huryn, D. M. & Smith, A. B. III (2007). Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 17, 4761–4766.  Web of Science CSD CrossRef PubMed CAS
First citationOxford Diffraction (2011). CrysAlis PRO. Oxford Diffraction Ltd, Yarnton, Oxfordshire, England.
First citationSheldrick, G. M. (2008). Acta Cryst. A64, 112–122.  Web of Science CrossRef CAS IUCr Journals
First citationSiemens (1994). XP. Siemens Analytical X-ray Instruments Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

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