Biotechnology and Bioengineering

Cover image for Vol. 112 Issue 9

Edited By: Douglas S. Clark

Impact Factor: 4.126

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 24/162 (Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology)

Online ISSN: 1097-0290

Featured

  • Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    Microtubule‐based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers

    Crystal structure of the tubulin dimer (PDB: 1JFF) showing the nonexchangeable (N) and exchangeable (E) GTP-binding sites on the α and β subunits, respectively. Linear chains αβ tubulin dimers, called protofilaments (middle, in black box), are formed through the head-to-tail self-assembly of dimers; lateral association of protofilaments forms a hollow tubule (i.e., MT filament; right) with an outer diameter of ∼25 nm and length in the tens of microns.

  • Molecular polygamy: The promiscuity of l-phenylalanyl-tRNA-synthetase triggers misincorporation of meta- and ortho-tyrosine in monoclonal antibodies expressed by Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Molecular polygamy: The promiscuity of l‐phenylalanyl‐tRNA‐synthetase triggers misincorporation of meta‐ and ortho‐tyrosine in monoclonal antibodies expressed by Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Formation of meta- and ortho-Tyr in production processes using CHO cells. (A) Reactive oxygen species (ROS) trigger the non-enzymatic formation of para-, meta- and ortho-Tyr and subsequently DOPA and dityrosine from Phe (R: CH2CH(NH2)CO2H). In eukaryotic cells, the non-essential amino acid para-Tyr can enzymatically be formed by phenylalanine hydroxylase (PH). Meta- and ortho- Tyr can be detected in production processes using CHO cells. Fourteen different biotherapeutic production processes originating from different scales (0.5–10,000 L) were analyzed for meta- (B, C) and ortho-Tyr (D, E) at day 0 and day 14. Nine different clones (CL 1–9) expressing either generic mAbs (mAb 1, mAb 2, mAb 3, mAb 4, mAb 5) or next generation complex mAb formats (cmAb 1, cmAb 2, cmAb 3) were processed in diverse culture media (chemically defined media: M 1, M 2, M 5; complex, hydrolysate containing media: M 3.0, M 3.1, M 4,). For CL 3 two different process strategies were used (Process 1, Process 2). Error bars represent standard deviation (for n = 3–4).

  • Single nucleotide polymorphism detection using gold nanoprobes and bio-microfluidic platform with embedded microlenses

    Single nucleotide polymorphism detection using gold nanoprobes and bio‐microfluidic platform with embedded microlenses

    Microscopic images of chip with air microlenses illuminated by halogen lamp during the positive and negative colorimetric Au-nanoprobe assays for FTO single mismatch detection (target DNA concentration: 30 ng/µL) taken 30; 40 and 50 min after salt addition (the solutions were injected to the channel 26 min after salt addition). The images were taken in dark conditions using a Stereo Microscope and Pentax K100 camera with long exposure time (30 s).

  • A robust method for increasing Fc glycan high mannose level of recombinant antibodies

    A robust method for increasing Fc glycan high mannose level of recombinant antibodies

    Impact of three different M:H ratio media on the levels of detected HM glycan species, including Man8, Man7, Man6, and Man5, in mAb1. Man9 species was not detected or the peak area was negligible. The HILIC method was used to assay HM glycan species. Each HM glycoform is normalized to HM level of M:H = 0.94.

  • Comprehensive evaluation of two genome-scale metabolic network models for Scheffersomyces stipitis

    Comprehensive evaluation of two genome‐scale metabolic network models for Scheffersomyces stipitis

    Phenotype phase plane analysis: (a) growth rate of iSS884, (b) growth rate of iBB814, (c) ethanol production of iSS884, (d) ethanol production of iBB814, (e) CO2 production of iSS884, (f) CO2 production of iBB814. All fluxes have the unit of mmol/gDW · h.

  • Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment

    Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment

    Numerical simulations of horizontal and vertical oxygen concentration profiles. (A) Conditions for the simulations. (B) Results of the simulation. The 2D distribution of the DO in the white frame is separately shown in a magnified view (C), similar to that measured experimentally (Fig. E). (D) Vertical DO profiles along the z axis at the sites of x = 4,500 and 5,500 μm, corresponding to the left and right edge of (C), respectively. Experimental data shown in Fig. D were also plotted (closed circles and triangles). (E) Gradient of the DO estimated using the experimental data (Fig. E) were plotted against x (closed circles). Purple curve represents the simulation results, estimated by using the 2D distribution of DO shown in (C), which are fitted well to the experimental data.

  • Microtubule‐based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers
  • Molecular polygamy: The promiscuity of l‐phenylalanyl‐tRNA‐synthetase triggers misincorporation of meta‐ and ortho‐tyrosine in monoclonal antibodies expressed by Chinese hamster ovary cells
  • Single nucleotide polymorphism detection using gold nanoprobes and bio‐microfluidic platform with embedded microlenses
  • A robust method for increasing Fc glycan high mannose level of recombinant antibodies
  • Comprehensive evaluation of two genome‐scale metabolic network models for Scheffersomyces stipitis
  • Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment

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Director
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Engineered thermostable fungal Cel6A and Cel7A cellobiohydrolases hydrolyze cellulose efficiently at elevated temperatures
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