BioEssays

Cover image for Vol. 39 Issue 6

Edited By: Andrew Moore

Online ISSN: 1521-1878

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Volume 39, Issue 5, May 2017


Nuclear codon reassignments in the genomics era and mechanisms behind their evolution

Nuclear codon reassignments in the genomics era and mechanisms behind their evolution

Martin Kollmar*, Stefanie Mühlhausen

With the recently discovered genetic code alterations, time has come to revisit the processes behind the genetic code diversity across the eukaryotic tree. The tRNA loss driven codon reassignment hypothesis, which attributes a special role to the charging of anticodon-mutated tRNAs, seems to be particularly apt at explaining these events.

BioEssays2017, 39, No. 5, 0–0 [Prospects & Overviews]

A tale of TALE, PREP1, PBX1, and MEIS1: Interconnections and competition in cancer

A tale of TALE, PREP1, PBX1, and MEIS1: Interconnections and competition in cancer

Francesco Blasi*, Chiara Bruckmann, Dmitry Penkov, Leila Dardaei

TALE proteins PREP1 and MEIS1 have opposite functions in tumors (tumor suppressor v. oncogene). To this end both need to dimerize with PBX1 but dimerization is mutually exclusive, hence they compete. PREP1-PBX1 and MEIS1-PBX1 dimers recognize specific DNA sequences and this accounts for their individual peculiar functions.

BioEssays2017, 39, No. 5, 0–0 [Prospects & Overviews]

Proton electrochemical gradient: Driving and regulating neurotransmitter uptake

Proton electrochemical gradient: Driving and regulating neurotransmitter uptake

Zohreh Farsi, Reinhard Jahn*, Andrew Woehler*

Neurotransmitter enrichment in synaptic vesicles is driven by a proton electrochemical gradient (△µH+) generated by the V-ATPase and limited by H+ leak. The balance between the concentration (△pH) and electrical (△Ψ) components of △µH+ is regulated by ion/proton exchangers and luminal buffers which may govern the efficiency of neurotransmitter loading.

BioEssays2017, 39, No. 5, 0–0 [Prospects & Overviews]

Hunger and thirst interact to regulate ingestive behavior in flies and mammals

Hunger and thirst interact to regulate ingestive behavior in flies and mammals

Nicholas Jourjine*

The nervous system uses internal signals of hunger and thirst to balance food and water ingestion behaviors. While hunger and thirst have traditionally been studied independently, recent work from flies and mammals suggests that cross-talk between neural systems underlying these biological drives may be more extensive than previously appreciated.

BioEssays2017, 39, No. 5, 0–0 [Prospects & Overviews]

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