Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 4

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 5.622

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 15/133 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Featured

  • DLX3-Dependent Regulation of Ion Transporters and Carbonic Anhydrases is Crucial for Enamel Mineralization

    DLX3‐Dependent Regulation of Ion Transporters and Carbonic Anhydrases is Crucial for Enamel Mineralization

    DLX3 involvement in secretory and maturation stage ameloblasts and effects of in vivo deletion of Dlx3 on gene expression in the enamel organ. DLX3 is expressed in both secretion and maturation stage ameloblasts. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that DLX3 has the potential to regulate the expression of (1) enamel matrix proteins during the secretion phase, (2) proteases expressed at the secretory and maturation stages, and (3) ion transporters and carbonic anhydrases expressed in maturation stage ameloblasts. In the enamel organ of Dlx3K14–cKO mice, the expression of enamel matrix proteins and proteases was not significantly affected, suggesting that other factors (TF-X) are compensating for the absence of DLX3 in regulating these genes. However, the expression of ion transporters and carbonic anhydrases was significantly affected by Dlx3 deletion, which shows that DLX3 is a master regulator of enamel mineralization though control of enamel pH.

  • The Effects of Aging and Sex Steroid Deficiency on the Murine Skeleton Are Independent and Mechanistically Distinct

    The Effects of Aging and Sex Steroid Deficiency on the Murine Skeleton Are Independent and Mechanistically Distinct

    The effects of aging on cortical bone are independent of estrogen status. Mice were either sham-operated (n = 10) or ovariectomized (5.5 months, n = 10; 19.5 months, n = 9) for 6 weeks. (A) Uterine and body weights. (B) Representative micro-CT images of femurs (top) and L5 vertebrae (bottom). The box depicts a region of 151 consecutive slices (12 μm/slice) analyzed for cancellous bone volume, as detailed in Supplemental Methods. The most proximate 90 slices, contained between the dotted line and the upper box line, were used for the measurements of cortical porosity to completely avoid the growth plate. (C) Femoral cortical (Ct.) thickness by micro-CT in the midshaft region and cortical porosity in the distal metaphysis. (D) Cancellous bone (bone volume/tissue volume [BV/TV]) in the 5th lumbar vertebra. Boxes depict values from the 25th to 75th quartiles, the middle line depicts the mean, and the vertical whiskers show the 10th and 90th percentiles; values outside this range are plotted as dots. Statistical significance calculated by two-way ANOVA, *p < 0.05; age × surgery interactions denoted as ‡.

  • Pharmacologically Inactive Bisphosphonates as an Alternative Strategy for Targeting Osteoclasts: In Vivo Assessment of 5-Fluorodeoxyuridine-Alendronate in a Preclinical Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases

    Pharmacologically Inactive Bisphosphonates as an Alternative Strategy for Targeting Osteoclasts: In Vivo Assessment of 5‐Fluorodeoxyuridine‐Alendronate in a Preclinical Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases

    (A) Goldners Trichrome staining on paraffin sections from tumor-burdened tibia. Extensive cortical and trabecular bone destruction is observed in the metaphysis region in control and 5-FdU–treated mice. Mice treated with alendronate and 5-FdU-ale have increased retention of bone tissue in the metaphysis indicative of antiresorptive activity localized to the metastatic site. * Indicates presence of tumor cells. (B) Antiresorptive treatment significantly increased the proportion of tissue area containing trabecular bone compared with control mice. (C) Adjacent sections were stained for collagen with Picrosirius Red and the trabecular width quantified by polarized light microscopy. A significant increase in trabecular width is observed in mice treated with 5-FdU-ale. No differences in trabecular number (D) or separation (E) are observed. Control n = 7; 5-FdU n = 7; alendronate n = 6; 5-FdU-ale n = 8. *p < 0.05, ***p < 0.001.

  • Inhibition of SLC7A11 by Sulfasalazine Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Modulating BMP2/4 Expression and Suppresses Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Mice

    Inhibition of SLC7A11 by Sulfasalazine Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Modulating BMP2/4 Expression and Suppresses Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Mice

    SAS suppressed bone loss in OVX mice. (A, B) Representative μCT images in SHAM mice, SHAM mice with SAS treatment, OVX mice, and OVX mice with SAS treatment at 4 weeks (A) and 8 weeks (B). Scale bar = 1 mm. H&E staining in SHAM mice, SHAM mice with SAS treatment, OVX mice, and OVX mice with SAS treatment at 4 and 8 weeks. Scale bar = 200 μm. (C–E) OVX mice treated with SAS had different degrees of improvement of BMD (C), trabecular number (D), and bone volume (E) compared with OVX mice. All data are shown as the mean ± SD. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 compared with OVX.

  • Addressing the Crisis in the Treatment of Osteoporosis: A Path Forward

    Addressing the Crisis in the Treatment of Osteoporosis: A Path Forward

    (A) DXA image from a 78-year-old woman on alendronate for 10 years suggesting periosteal flare on the outer aspect of the right femur (arrow). (B) Plain X-ray confirming the periosteal flare due to AFF (arrow). Reproduced from McKenna et al. with permission.

  • DLX3‐Dependent Regulation of Ion Transporters and Carbonic Anhydrases is Crucial for Enamel Mineralization
  • The Effects of Aging and Sex Steroid Deficiency on the Murine Skeleton Are Independent and Mechanistically Distinct
  • Pharmacologically Inactive Bisphosphonates as an Alternative Strategy for Targeting Osteoclasts: In Vivo Assessment of 5‐Fluorodeoxyuridine‐Alendronate in a Preclinical Model of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases
  • Inhibition of SLC7A11 by Sulfasalazine Enhances Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Modulating BMP2/4 Expression and Suppresses Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Mice
  • Addressing the Crisis in the Treatment of Osteoporosis: A Path Forward

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eCompendia bring together recently published JBMR® articles on topical issues. Specific topics are selected for each eCompendium to provide the reader with an easy-to-access update that brings together original research articles in the chosen area.

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Osteoporosis: The Treatment Gap


ASBMR 2016 Publications Workshop Presentation

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JBMR's 30th Anniversary: Cause for Celebration

eCompendia Series

Celebrate the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 30th Anniversary! Browse our new timeline and see key milestones over the years!

Read the Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Juliet Compston right here

Announcing

JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


STROBE: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of human observational case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies are now required to upload the STROBE checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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