Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 7

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 6.284

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2016: 14/138 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Associated Title(s): JBMR Plus

Featured

  • Coupling of Bone Resorption and Formation in Real Time: New Knowledge Gained From Human Haversian BMUs

    Coupling of Bone Resorption and Formation in Real Time: New Knowledge Gained From Human Haversian BMUs

    The positions of osteoclasts and reversal/osteoprogenitor cells in longitudinal sections of cutting cones. (A–C) Three adjacent longitudinal sections of a cutting cone in the fibula of a 65-year-old man were respectively Masson's trichrome stained (A) and immunostained for the osteoclastic markers TRAcP (B) and cathepsin K (CatK) (C). The latter two markers reveal tightly packed osteoclasts at the tip (“1ary osteoclasts,” orange arrowheads) and sparsely distributed osteoclasts on the eroded walls (ES) of the cutting cone (“2ary osteoclasts,” yellow arrowheads), up to the starting point of osteoid deposition (OS). (D, E). Two views of the 3D organization of osteoclasts (red) within a cutting cone in the femur of a 12-year-old boy. The 3D reconstruction was generated by aligning micrographs from 30 serial sections immunostained for CatK (red). The pictures show the cutting cone opened along its longitudinal axis, up to where bone formation starts (OS, blue). They reveal tightly packed osteoclasts at the tip (1ary OCs) and a sparse distribution of osteoclasts on the wall (2ary OCs). This distribution indicates initial and later resorption periods, playing a role in respectively elongating and widening the cutting cone. (F–N) Position of reversal/osteoprogenitor cells respective to osteoclasts. Three serial sections of a cutting cone in the femur of a 10-year-old girl were in situ hybridized for the mRNA of the osteoblastic markers collagen type 3 (Coll3 in F–H), alkaline phosphatase (ALP in I–K), or Runx2 (L–N) (red) and subsequently immunostained for TRAcP (black). Note that reversal/osteoprogenitor cells (green arrows) appear on the eroded wall (ES) immediately after the initial resorption period (orange arrowheads) and are present together with scattered secondary osteoclasts (yellow arrowheads) all along the cutting cone up to the onset of osteoid deposition (OS). The latter intermixed cell population points to the existence of a mixed “reversal-resorption” phase. Scale bars = (A–C, F, I, L) 50 μm; (G, H, J, K, M, N) 20 μm.

  • PTHrP(12-48) Modulates the Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Suppresses Human Osteoclast Differentiation and Lifespan

    PTHrP(12‐48) Modulates the Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Suppresses Human Osteoclast Differentiation and Lifespan

    Schematic of the local actions of PTHrP(12-48) in the tumor–bone marrow microenvironment. Metastatic tumors in the bone marrow niche drive bone marrow and bone cell activity and differentiation. (1) Tumor cells release molecules that activate osteoclast differentiation and osteolysis, increase mesenchymal cell activity and other hematopoietic cells (including osteoclast precursors) locally or distantly (IL-8, PTHrP, TGF-β). (2) The same tumor also releases inhibitory molecules PTHrP(12-48) that locally inhibit monocyte/macrophage osteoclast precursor cell survival, differentiation, and osteolysis, as well other hematopoietic cells. The local PTHrP(12-48) action remodels the local microenvironment, permitting expansion of mesenchymal cells known to be important for the tumor niche, while modifying other hematopoietic elements. Validating this model phenomenon in humans is crucial to understanding the physiological roles of PTHrP(12-48). HSC = hematopoietic stem cell; MSC = mesenchymal stromal cell.

  • The Estimation of Second-Generation HR-pQCT From First-Generation HR-pQCT Using In Vivo Cross-Calibration

    The Estimation of Second‐Generation HR‐pQCT From First‐Generation HR‐pQCT Using In Vivo Cross‐Calibration

    Representative image slice obtained on XCTI (left) and XCTII (right) HR-pQCT from radius (top) and tibia (bottom) scans of a representative participant.

  • Osteoporosis Is the Most Important Risk Factor for Odontoid Fractures in the Elderly

    Osteoporosis Is the Most Important Risk Factor for Odontoid Fractures in the Elderly

    Measurement of attenuation values. CT images of the upper C-spine (sagittal reformation, 10 mm average intensity projection), which were used to measure attenuation values. ROIs were placed in the anterior half of the vertebral body and ROI dimensions were standardized to half of the superior-inferior vertebral body dimensions.

  • Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR-Dependent Neo-Angiogenic Switch

    Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR‐Dependent Neo‐Angiogenic Switch

    Genetic loss of β2AR in osteoblasts prevents the increase in bone vascular density induced by ISO. (A) Representative 10× and 20× confocal images of hindlimb bone sections from WT and β2ARobKO mice treated with PBS or ISO for 6 weeks, stained for endomucin (IF, red). Scale bar = 100 µm. Hoechst = blue. (B) Quantification of endomucin (+) area/total area (n = 4–5). (C) Quantification of the number of endomucin (+) vessels/area (n = 4–5) (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001).

  • Tethering Formation to Resorption: Reversal Revisited

    Tethering Formation to Resorption: Reversal Revisited

    Cartoon of a bone remodeling unit in cortical bone, showing the change in the designation of the reversal phase as a result of recent new findings. IR = initial resorption; RR = radial resorption; Og = osteoprogenitor cell; Oc = osteoclast.

  • Coupling of Bone Resorption and Formation in Real Time: New Knowledge Gained From Human Haversian BMUs
  • PTHrP(12‐48) Modulates the Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Suppresses Human Osteoclast Differentiation and Lifespan
  • The Estimation of Second‐Generation HR‐pQCT From First‐Generation HR‐pQCT Using In Vivo Cross‐Calibration
  • Osteoporosis Is the Most Important Risk Factor for Odontoid Fractures in the Elderly
  • Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR‐Dependent Neo‐Angiogenic Switch
  • Tethering Formation to Resorption: Reversal Revisited

Just Published Articles

  1. Hypophosphatasia in Adults: Clinical Assessment and Treatment Considerations

    Jay R Shapiro and E Michael Lewiecki

    Accepted manuscript online: 21 JUL 2017 06:16AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3226

  2. Evaluating atypical features of femur fractures: How change in radiological criteria influenced incidence and demography of atypical femur fractures in a community setting

    Erin S LeBlanc, A Gabriela Rosales, Dennis M Black, Harry K Genant, Richard M Dell, Darin M Friess, David L Boardman, Douglas C Bauer, Anne de Papp, Arthur C Santora and Eric S Orwoll

    Accepted manuscript online: 21 JUL 2017 06:11AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3221

  3. Alkaline Phosphatase: Discovery and Naming of Our Favorite Enzyme

    Alejandro F. Siller and Michael P. Whyte

    Accepted manuscript online: 20 JUL 2017 08:00AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3225

  4. Kynurenine, a Tryptophan Metabolite that Accumulates with Age, Induces Bone Loss

    Mona El Refaey, Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence, Sadanand Fulzele, Eileen J. Kennedy, Wendy B. Bollag, Mohammed Elsalanty, Qing Zhong, Ke-Hong Ding, Nathaniel G. Bendzunas, Xing-ming Shi, Jianrui Xu, William D. Hill, Maribeth H. Johnson, Monte Hunter, Jessica L. Pierce, Kanglun Yu, Mark W. Hamrick and Carlos M. Isales

    Accepted manuscript online: 20 JUL 2017 08:00AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3224

  5. Overexpression of GαS in Murine Osteoblasts In Vivo Leads to Increased Bone Mass and Decreased Bone Quality

    Lucia Zhang, Kim S. Sugamori, Colin Claridge, Ariana dela Cruz, Marc D. Grynpas and Jane Mitchell

    Accepted manuscript online: 20 JUL 2017 08:00AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.3223

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Design Enhancements for JBMR Online

Design Enhancements for JBMR online

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JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


STROBE: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of human observational case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies are now required to upload the STROBE checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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Osteoporosis: The Treatment Gap


ASBMR 2016 Publications Workshop Presentation

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