Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 5

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 5.622

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 15/133 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Associated Title(s): JBMR Plus

Featured

  • Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Better Bone Microarchitecture But Lower Bone Material Strength and Poorer Physical Function in Elderly Women: A Population-Based Study

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Better Bone Microarchitecture But Lower Bone Material Strength and Poorer Physical Function in Elderly Women: A Population‐Based Study

    Representative HR-pQCT images of the radius at the standard site, 9.5 mm from the articular plateau (A = scout radiograph) from a woman with T2DM (B) and from a control subject (C). BV/TV = trabecular bone volume fraction.

  • Differences in Trabecular Microstructure Between Black and White Women Assessed by Individual Trabecular Segmentation Analysis of HR-pQCT Images

    Differences in Trabecular Microstructure Between Black and White Women Assessed by Individual Trabecular Segmentation Analysis of HR‐pQCT Images

    ITS images of the radius and tibia of a representative black woman and white woman.

  • Canalization Leads to Similar Whole Bone Mechanical Function at Maturity in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    Canalization Leads to Similar Whole Bone Mechanical Function at Maturity in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    Schematic highlighting the key morphological and compositional differences between male A/J and B6 mice at age 16 weeks. Note that at this age of skeletal maturity these mouse strains demonstrate equivalent bone strength. Images taken using nanoCT at an 8-μm voxel size.

  • Evidence of Staphylococcus Aureus Deformation, Proliferation, and Migration in Canaliculi of Live Cortical Bone in Murine Models of Osteomyelitis

    Evidence of Staphylococcus Aureus Deformation, Proliferation, and Migration in Canaliculi of Live Cortical Bone in Murine Models of Osteomyelitis

    TEM evidence of submicron-elongated S. aureus in the osteocytic lacunar-canaliculi network of infected live bone tissue. Long bones from mice (n = 5) infected with a UAMS-1–contaminated tibial pin (A–F, H, I), or a USA300-infected femoral osteotomy (G), were harvested on day 14 postinfection for TEM. (A) Low magnification TEM image (×4000) of UAMS-1 invasion of live bone tissue (note osteocyte OC) in a canaliculus (green arrow) communicating with the marrow cavity (MC). Also note the proximal neutrophils (yellow arrow) within the marrow. (B) Low magnification TEM image (×4000) of UAMS-1 invasion of an osteocytic lacunar-canaliculus adjacent to a channel infected with S. aureus (arrows) containing necrotic cells (*). Higher magnification TEM images (C: ×8000; D: ×10,000) of UAMS-1 colonization of osteocytic lacunae. (E) Low magnification TEM image of three parallel canaliculi in various states of colonization (1: severely infected; 2: moderately infected; and 3: uninfected) by the invading UAMS-1 within the live cortical bone (×3500). (F) Higher magnification TEM image measuring submicron-elongated UAMS-1 (×15,000). (G) Similar bacterial invasion of canaliculi adjacent to the osteotomy (red arrow), and neutrophils in the marrow cavity (*) were observed in USA300-infected femurs (×4000), but not in long bones that received sterile implants (data not shown). (H) Low magnification TEM image (×4000) documenting cortical bone damage adjacent to the infected tibia pin (red arrows), and a cavity filled with UAMS-1 (yellow bracket) that leads to a canaliculus (black arrow). (I) High magnification TEM of the infected cavity in H demonstrating mitotic S. aureus in the live cortical bone (×25,000). Note that only the bacterium entering the canaliculus has an asymmetric septal plane (red arrows), which is aligned perpendicularly with the canaliculus orifice, perhaps to anchor and propel the emerging daughter cell into the submicron channel in the cortical bone during binary fission.

  • Sclerostin Antibody Administration Converts Bone Lining Cells Into Active Osteoblasts

    Sclerostin Antibody Administration Converts Bone Lining Cells Into Active Osteoblasts

    Scl-Ab treatment does not affect proliferation or apoptosis of endosteal lining cells. (A) Four hours before euthanization, mice were treated with EdU. Confocal images of sections for EdU and tdTomato. Although many EdU-positive bone marrow cells were observed, no EdU-positive tdTomato-positive cells on bone surfaces were observed. Scale bar = 50 μm. (B) Sections were stained with an antibody that recognizes activated caspase 3 (green). Although many caspase-3-positive bone marrow cells were observed, no tdTomato-positive cells on bone surfaces stained positive for activated caspase 3 in any of the experimental groups.

  • CRISPR/CAS9 Technologies

    CRISPR/CAS9 Technologies

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic engineering. The protein Cas9 (green) is composed of two independent nuclease domains (RuvC and HNH). Cas9 is directed to a specific DNA location by an sgRNA; the sgRNA contains a unique ∼20-base sequence that is homologous to the DNA target and immediately upstream of the PAM sequence, which is the three-nucleotide sequence NGG for Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9. After double-strand DNA cleavage by Cas9, the damaged DNA can be repaired by NHEJ, which often results in small insertions (red base pairs) or deletions (indels), or by HDR in which a donor DNA molecule (introduced along with the sgRNA and Cas9) is used as a template to repair the damaged DNA. By using donor DNAs it is possible to precisely edit genomic DNA, such as by incorporating a new DNA sequence (red base pairs). sgRNA = single guide RNA; PAM = protospacer adjacent motif; NHEJ = non-homologous end-joining; HDR = homology-directed repair.

  • Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Better Bone Microarchitecture But Lower Bone Material Strength and Poorer Physical Function in Elderly Women: A Population‐Based Study
  • Differences in Trabecular Microstructure Between Black and White Women Assessed by Individual Trabecular Segmentation Analysis of HR‐pQCT Images
  • Canalization Leads to Similar Whole Bone Mechanical Function at Maturity in Two Inbred Strains of Mice
  • Evidence of Staphylococcus Aureus Deformation, Proliferation, and Migration in Canaliculi of Live Cortical Bone in Murine Models of Osteomyelitis
  • Sclerostin Antibody Administration Converts Bone Lining Cells Into Active Osteoblasts
  • CRISPR/CAS9 Technologies

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eCompendia

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eCompendia – special issues of recent JBMR® articles on hot topics

eCompendia bring together recently published JBMR® articles on topical issues. Specific topics are selected for each eCompendium to provide the reader with an easy-to-access update that brings together original research articles in the chosen area.

Examples of topics addressed in recent eCompendia include Kidney Disease and Bone, Sclerostin: Preclinical and Clinical Studies and Genetics of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

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Osteoporosis: The Treatment Gap


ASBMR 2016 Publications Workshop Presentation

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JBMR's 30th Anniversary: Cause for Celebration

eCompendia Series

Celebrate the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 30th Anniversary! Browse our new timeline and see key milestones over the years!

Read the Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Juliet Compston right here

Announcing

JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


STROBE: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of human observational case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies are now required to upload the STROBE checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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