Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 7

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 5.622

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 15/131 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Featured

  • Osteocyte Apoptosis Caused by Hindlimb Unloading is Required to Trigger Osteocyte RANKL Production and Subsequent Resorption of Cortical and Trabecular Bone in Mice Femurs

    Osteocyte Apoptosis Caused by Hindlimb Unloading is Required to Trigger Osteocyte RANKL Production and Subsequent Resorption of Cortical and Trabecular Bone in Mice Femurs

    (A) Femoral mid-diaphyseal section showing the anatomical sampling regions examined. (B) Photomicrographs of mid-diaphyseal cortical bone sections from mice subjected to 5 days of unloading (5d HLU) stained by immunohistochemistry for activated caspase 3 (Casp3, top left), its negative control (Neg Ctrl, bottom left); RANKL (top right), and its negative control (bottom right). Arrows indicate positively stained osteocytes (+Ot); scale bars = 40 μm.

  • Recurrent Proximal Femur Fractures in a Teenager With Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Continuous Bisphosphonate Therapy: Are We Overtreating?

    Recurrent Proximal Femur Fractures in a Teenager With Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Continuous Bisphosphonate Therapy: Are We Overtreating?

    At age 9 years, after 2.5 years (10 cycles) of pamidronate, radiographs show bilateral femurs with good mid-shaft cortical thickness, no vertebral fractures and a straight spine.

  • A Longitudinal Study of Skeletal Histomorphometry at 6 and 24 Months Across Four Bone Envelopes in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis Receiving Teriparatide or Zoledronic Acid in the SHOTZ Trial

    A Longitudinal Study of Skeletal Histomorphometry at 6 and 24 Months Across Four Bone Envelopes in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis Receiving Teriparatide or Zoledronic Acid in the SHOTZ Trial

    Tetracycline labels in (A) cancellous bone and (B) cortical bone, showing endocortical, intracortical, and periosteal surfaces at 6 and 24 months. Note extensive labeling on all bone surfaces in the TPTD group compared with few labels in the ZOL group. (A) In the lower right image, the labels administered at 6 and 24 months can both be seen, allowing visualization of new bone laid down in the intervening 18 months. (B) In the upper right image, note the smooth cement line underlying the convex packet of new bone on the endocortical envelope. This suggests that this bone was formed by modeling-based, rather than remodeling-based, formation. Further, in the lower right image, there is a Haversian system that was in the formation phase of the cycle at 6 months, but which is closed at month 24.

  • Cbfb2 Isoform Dominates More Potent Cbfb1 and Is Required for Skeletal Development

    Cbfb2 Isoform Dominates More Potent Cbfb1 and Is Required for Skeletal Development

    Examination of skeletal system. (A) Whole skeletons of Cbfb2+/+, Cbfb1–/–, Cbfb2+/–, Cbfb2–/–, Cbfb+/+, and Cbfb+/– embryos at E15.5. Cbfb2+/+ wild-type embryo (a) is a littermate of Cbfb2+/– (c) and Cbfb2–/– (d) embryos. Cbfb+/+ wild-type embryo (e) is a littermate of Cbfb+/– embryo (f). The skeletons of wild-type littermates of Cbfb1–/– embryo (b), which were similar to those of Cbfb2+/+ embryo (a), are not shown. Skeletal size of Cbfb2–/– embryos is apparently small (d). (B) Lateral view of the head. Mineralization of frontal and parietal bones, mandible, and maxilla was severely reduced in Cbfb2–/– embryos (d). Mineralization of interparietal bone was delayed in Cbfb+/– embryos compared with that in Cbfb+/+ embryos (e, f). (C) Bottom view of head. Mineralization of basioccipital, exoccipital, and sphenoid bones was nearly absent in Cbfb2–/– embryos (d). These bones were less mineralized in Cbfb+/– embryos than in Cbfb+/+ embryos (e, f). (D) Lateral view of chest wall. The mineralization of vertebrae was absent and that of ribs was severely reduced in Cbfb2–/– embryos (d). The mineralization of vertebrae and ribs was mildly reduced in Cbfb+/– embryos compared with that in Cbfb+/+ embryos (e, f). (E, F) Upper limbs (E) and lower limbs (F). The mineralization of limb bones and clavicle (arrow) was severely reduced in Cbfb2–/– embryos (E-d, F-d). The mineralization of limb bones was mildly reduced in Cbfb+/– embryos compared with that in Cbfb+/+ embryos (E-e, f; F-e, f). The mineralization in whole skeletons was similar among Cbfb2+/+, Cbfb1–/–, and Cbfb2+/– embryos. Three embryos in each genotype were examined and representative data are shown. Scale bar = 1 mm.

  • CCL20/CCR6 Signaling Regulates Bone Mass Accrual in Mice

    CCL20/CCR6 Signaling Regulates Bone Mass Accrual in Mice

    Expression of CCL20 and CCR6 in bone cells. (A) BMM were cultured in the presence or absence of M-CSF/RANKL. (B–E) BMSC were cultured in the presence or absence of (B–E) osteogenic, (B) adipogenic, or (B) chondrogenic media. (A–C) CCL20 and CCR6 mRNA expression was determined by qRT-PCR. ND = not detected. (D) Protein levels of CCR6 in total cell lysates were determined by Western analysis. Representative blot from 2 independent experiments. (E) Protein levels of CCL20 in conditioned media were determined by ELISA. Data for A–C and E are representative of ≥3 independent experiments, n = 3. Data are reported as the mean ± SEM. **p < 0.01; ***p < 0.001. (F) CCL20 expression in murine femora was determined by immunohistochemical staining, n = 3. Proteins were identified using DAB (brown) and visualized by light microscopy (×200). (G) CCR6 and osteocalcin (OC) expression in murine femora was determined by immunofluorescent labeling with red and green fluorophores, respectively, and presented as individual and composite images (yellow = co-localization of CCR6 and osteocalcin in osteoblasts) obtained by fluorescence microscopy (×200), n = 3. Ob = osteoblast; C = chondrocyte; BM = bone marrow; red arrowheads = osteocytes.

  • Osteocyte Apoptosis Caused by Hindlimb Unloading is Required to Trigger Osteocyte RANKL Production and Subsequent Resorption of Cortical and Trabecular Bone in Mice Femurs
  • Recurrent Proximal Femur Fractures in a Teenager With Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Continuous Bisphosphonate Therapy: Are We Overtreating?
  • A Longitudinal Study of Skeletal Histomorphometry at 6 and 24 Months Across Four Bone Envelopes in Postmenopausal Women With Osteoporosis Receiving Teriparatide or Zoledronic Acid in the SHOTZ Trial
  • Cbfb2 Isoform Dominates More Potent Cbfb1 and Is Required for Skeletal Development
  • CCL20/CCR6 Signaling Regulates Bone Mass Accrual in Mice

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ASBMR 2015 Publications Workshop Presentation

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JBMR's 30th Anniversary: Cause for Celebration

30anniversary

Read the Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Juliet Compston right here

Announcing

JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


STROBE: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of human observational case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies are now required to upload the STROBE checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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