Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 524 Issue 6

Accepted Articles (Accepted, unedited articles published online and citable. The final edited and typeset version of record will appear in future.)

Edited By: PATRICK R. HOF

Impact Factor: 3.225

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 5/154 (Zoology); 106/252 (Neurosciences)

Online ISSN: 1096-9861

VIEW

  1. 1 - 15
  1. Research Articles

    1. Interhemispheric connections between the infralimbic and entorhinal cortices: The endopiriform nucleus has limbic connections that parallel the sensory and motor connections of the claustrum

      Glenn D.R. Watson, Jared B. Smith and Kevin D. Alloway

      Accepted manuscript online: 10 FEB 2016 01:30AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23981

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using neuroanatomical tracing techniques, the authors show that the dorsal endopiriform nucleus has similar patterns of intra- and inter-hemispheric connectivity with limbic cortices as the claustrum does with sensory and motor cortices. Thus, these two adjacent, highly similar nuclei likely serve similar computational strategies for the interhemispheric coordination of cortical information.

  2. Editorial

    1. You have free access to this content
      Editorial for the special issue on brain circuits for positive emotions

      Carlo Calanchini, Claudio Bassetti and Marco R. Celio

      Accepted manuscript online: 9 FEB 2016 03:36AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23974

  3. Research Articles

    1. Feedback from each retinal neuron population drives expression of subsequent fate determinant genes without influencing the cell cycle exit timing

      Jeremy Ng Chi Kei, Stefanie Dudczig, Peter D. Currie and Patricia R. Jusuf

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:16AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23976

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using in vivo timelapse imaging and birthdating experiments in zebrafish, the authors investigated the highly conserved birthorder of different neuron types during retinogenesis. They show that loss of neuron populations delays the expression timing of fate determinant genes important for subsequent neural fates, without changing cell cycle timing of progenitors.

    2. The olfactory pathway of the hornet Vespa velutina: new insights into the evolution of the hymenopteran antennal lobe

      Antoine Couto, Benoit Lapeyre, Denis Thiéry and Jean-Christophe Sandoz

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:16AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23975

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using neural tracers and confocal microscopy, the authors analyze the morphology of the hornet Vespa velutina brain, especially its antennal lobe, and show a low polymorphism between castes and sexes. Introducing a novel nomenclature for glomerular clusters, they propose homologies with the antennal lobes of ants and bees.

    3. A quantitative comparison of the hemispheric, areal, and laminar origins of sensory and motor cortical projections to the superior colliculus of the cat

      Blake E. Butler, Nicole Chabot and Stephen G. Lomber

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:15AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23980

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Corticotectal projections for visual, auditory, somatosensory, motor, and limbic cortices are quantified and contrasted via a retrograde pathway tracer injected into the superior colliculus of the cat. While the vast majority of cortical inputs originate in visual cortex, only the auditory field of the ectosylvian sulcus projects bilaterally.

    4. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex

      Ignacio Leguey, Concha Bielza, Pedro Larrañaga, Asta Kastanauskaite, Concepción Rojo, Ruth Benavides-Piccione and Javier DeFelipe

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:15AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23977

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Exploring the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells, we found that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells display common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of each cortical layer in the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    5. Tectothalamic inhibitory projection neurons in the avian torus semicircularis

      Tetsufumi Ito and Yasuro Atoji

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:14AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23979

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In mammals, tectothalamic inhibitory neurons have large somata which receive dense excitatory axosomatic synapses, and referred as large GABAergic (LG) neurons. In the present study, authors found LG neurons in birds. Dense excitatory axosomatic terminals (red) on an LG soma are obvious in this electron micrograph. Blue: inhibitory terminals.

    6. Individual sympathetic postganglionic neurons co-innervate myenteric ganglia and smooth muscle layers in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat

      Gary C. Walter, Robert J. Phillips, Jennifer L. McAdams and Terry L. Powley

      Accepted manuscript online: 6 FEB 2016 05:14AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23978

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Individual sympathetic postganglionic neurons, labeled by injections of the anterograde tracer dextran, projected directly to both the gastrointestinal smooth muscle sheets and the local myenteric ganglia throughout the stomach and small intestine. This widespread co-innervation pattern suggests that sympathetic fibers may directly influence smooth muscle while contributing to myenteric-plexus-muscle coordination.

    7. Active immunization against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide decreases neuronal recruitmetnt and inhibits reproduction in zebra finches

      Yulia Vistoropsky-Katz, Rachel Heiblum, Nechama-Ina Smorodinsky and Anat Barnea

      Accepted manuscript online: 23 JAN 2016 02:50AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23971

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Active immunization against vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) of adult female zebra finches caused a reduction of neuronal recruitment in the nidopallium caudale (NC) and the hippocampus (HC), inhibited reproduction and induced molt. No changes in prolactin levels in the plasma were measured indicating a direct effect of VIP.

    8. Synaptic circuitry of identified neurons in the antennal lobe of Drosophila melanogaster

      Jürgen Rybak, Giovanni Talarico, Santiago Ruiz, Christopher Arnold, Rafael Cantera and Bill S. Hansson

      Accepted manuscript online: 18 JAN 2016 06:27PM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23966

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In olfactory glomeruli of Drosophila melanogaster antennal lobe projection neurons (PN) form reciprocal synapses with olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) and local interneurones (LN). Input (yellow) and output (red) synaptic sites are segregated along the PN dendritic tree. Inset: Example of synaptic networks identified by deep reconstructions of electron microscopy sections.

    9. Regional expression and ultrastructural localization of EphA7 in the hippocampus and cerebellum of adult rat

      Clara A. Amegandjin, Wafaa Jammow, Sylvie Laforest, Mustapha Riad, Moogeh Baharnoori, Frédérique Badeaux, Luc DesGroseillers, Keith K. Murai, Elena B. Pasquale, Guy Drolet and Guy Doucet

      Accepted manuscript online: 18 JAN 2016 06:20PM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23962

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      EphA7 is localized in post-synaptic densities of dendritic spines and shafts, on astrocytic leaflets and on vesicles and synaptic surface of axonal terminals, but rarely found altogether on all 3 locations of a single synapse, in single thin sections. Thus EphA7 appears to play diverse roles at different synaptic contacts.

    10. Topographic organization of the basal forebrain projections to the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortex in rats

      Hideki Kondo and Laszlo Zaborszky

      Accepted manuscript online: 18 JAN 2016 06:18PM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23967

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using retrograde tracing combined with ChAT immunohistochemistry, we show that the perirhinal and postrhinal cortices receive cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections mainly from the caudal part of the basal forebrain whereas the entorhinal cortex receives projections mainly from the rostral part of the basal forebrain in rats.

    11. Organization of the sleep related neural systems in the brain of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)

      Leigh-Anne Dell, Nina Patzke, Muhammad A. Spocter, Jerome M. Siegel and Paul R. Manger

      Accepted manuscript online: 20 NOV 2015 10:41AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23929

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using immunohistochemical methods we examined the sleep-wake neural systems in the brain of the harbour porpoise. We find that quantitative, rather than qualitative, differences in the pontine nuclei, such as the locus coeruleus, appears to allow cetaceans to sleep with half their brain at a time.

    12. Organization of the sleep related neural systems in the brain of the river hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius): A most unusual Cetartiodactyl species

      Leigh-Anne Dell, Nina Patzke, Muhammad A. Spocter, Mads F. Bertelsen, Jerome M. Siegel and Paul R. Manger

      Accepted manuscript online: 20 NOV 2015 10:40AM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23930

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using immunohistochemical methods we examined the sleep-wake neural systems in the brain of the river hippopotamus. While hippopotami appear to sleep bihemispherically like other mammals, unusual features of the cholinergic system indicate that there might be an as yet undescribed sleep state in this unusual cetartiodactyl.

  4. Reviews

    1. Cortical control of facial expression

      René M. Müri

      Accepted manuscript online: 29 SEP 2015 06:11PM EST | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23908

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Facial expressions are central part of human non-verbal behavior and communication. Facial expression is both voluntarily and emotionally controlled. Recent studies in non-human primates and humans revealed that motor control of facial expression is distributed. At least 5 cortical regions on the medial and lateral hemisphere are involved. The primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex and the supplementary motor area are important for the voluntary control of facial expression, the cingulate areas are important for emotional innervation, since they receive input from many regions of the limbic system.

VIEW

  1. 1 - 15

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION