Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 122 Issue 13

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Fadlo R. Khuri, MD

Impact Factor: 5.649

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 26/213 (Oncology)

Online ISSN: 1097-0142

Associated Title(s): Cancer Cytopathology, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

VIEW

  1. 1 - 100
  2. 101 - 115
  1. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Significant impact of biochemical recurrence on overall mortality in patients with high-risk prostate cancer after carbon-ion radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy

      Goro Kasuya, Hitoshi Ishikawa, Hiroshi Tsuji, Takuma Nomiya, Hirokazu Makishima, Tadashi Kamada, Koichiro Akakura, Hiroyoshi Suzuki, Jun Shimazaki, Yasuo Haruyama, Gen Kobashi, Hirohiko Tsujii and for the Working Group for Genitourinary Tumors

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30050

      Two prospective phase 2 studies involving 324 high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with carbon-ion radiotherapy have revealed that the presence of biochemical recurrence is an independent predictive factor for overall mortality (hazard ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-5.08; P = .001) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer after carbon-ion radiotherapy according to a multivariate analysis.

    2. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Randomized phase 3 study in low-grade lymphoma comparing maintenance anti-CD20 antibody with observation after induction therapy: A trial of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E1496)

      Stefan K. Barta, Hailun Li, Howard S. Hochster, Fangxin Hong, Edie Weller, Randy D. Gascoyne, Thomas M. Habermann, Leo I. Gordon, Natalia Colocci, Elizabeth M. Bengtson, Sandra J. Horning and Brad S. Kahl

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30137

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      Long-term follow-up from the E1496 study shows that maintenance rituximab results in a long-lasting progression-free survival benefit without significant toxicities for patients with indolent lymphomas. However, overall survival does not differ between patients on maintenance rituximab and patients on observation.

    3. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Statewide geographic variation in outcomes for adults with acute myeloid leukemia in North Carolina

      Ashley T. Freeman, Anne-Marie Meyer, Andrew B. Smitherman, Lei Zhou, Ethan M. Basch, Thomas C. Shea and William A. Wood

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30139

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      Survival among patients with acute myeloid leukemia in North Carolina varies according to geographic region, and these survival disparities may be attributed to differences in the local health care infrastructure. Further examination of local practice and referral patterns may inform strategies to improve outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in North Carolina.

    4. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Management strategies and outcomes for very elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

      Dai Chihara, Jason R. Westin, Yasuhiro Oki, Mohamed A. Ahmed, Bryan Do, Luis E. Fayad, Fredrick B. Hagemeister, Jorge E. Romaguera, Michelle A. Fanale, Hun J. Lee, Francesco Turturro, Felipe Samaniego, Sattva S. Neelapu, M. Alma Rodriguez, Nathan H. Fowler, Michael Wang, Richard E. Davis and Loretta J. Nastoupil

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30173

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      Very elderly fit patients (age ≥ 80 years) have survival outcomes similar to those of younger patients with standard-dose anthracycline-based regimens. Patient education and close monitoring with sufficient supportive therapy during treatment are imperative for preventing treatment-related mortality.

  2. Correspondence

    1. Reply to breast cancer risk by the extent and type of atypical hyperplasia

      Laura C. Collins, Stuart J. Schnitt and Rulla M. Tamimi

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30149

  3. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      Ascertainment of postprostatectomy radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database

      Kyle Wang, Nathan C. Sheets, Ramsankar Basak and Ronald C. Chen

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30154

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      Among men who receive postprostatectomy radiotherapy within 1 year of undergoing surgery, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data appear to underascertain the receipt of radiotherapy in 44% of patients. SEER data alone should not be used to examine patterns of secondary treatment in patients with prostate cancer.

    2. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
      Extent of atypical hyperplasia stratifies breast cancer risk in 2 independent cohorts of women

      Amy C. Degnim, William D. Dupont, Derek C. Radisky, Robert A. Vierkant, Ryan D. Frank, Marlene H. Frost, Stacey J. Winham, Melinda E. Sanders, Jeffrey R. Smith, David L. Page, Tanya L. Hoskin, Celine M. Vachon, Karthik Ghosh, Tina J. Hieken, Lori A. Denison, Jodi M. Carter, Lynn C. Hartmann and Daniel W. Visscher

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30153

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      In the Mayo Clinic and Nashville cohort studies of benign breast disease, the number of foci of atypical hyperplasia stratifies the long-term breast cancer risk for both the atypical ductal hyperplasia subtype and the atypical lobular hyperplasia subtype. See also pages 000-000 and 000-000.

  4. Correspondence

    1. Breast cancer risk by the extent and type of atypical hyperplasia

      Amy C. Degnim, Daniel W. Visscher, Derek C. Radisky, Marlene H. Frost, Robert A. Vierkant, Ryan D. Frank, Stacey J. Winham, Celine M. Vachon, William D. Dupont and Lynn C. Hartmann

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30151

  5. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Symptom Control and Palliative Care
      Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) item banks for routine surveillance of sleep and fatigue problems in ambulatory cancer care

      Yvonne W. Leung, Catherine Brown, Andrea Perez Cosio, Aditi Dobriyal, Noor Malik, Vivien Pat, Margaret Irwin, Pascale Tomasini, Geoffrey Liu and Doris Howell

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30134

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      The feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Computerized Adaptive Testing for fatigue and sleep-disturbance items are assessed in an observational study and compared with legacy measures. The findings support the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the system and its potential for use in routine ambulatory cancer care.

    2. Epidemiology
      Childhood leukemia incidence in California: High and rising in the Hispanic population

      Brenda M. Giddings, Todd P. Whitehead, Catherine Metayer and Mark D. Miller

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30129

      Compared with non-Hispanic white children, Hispanic children in California appear to have a significantly higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia whereas African American and Asian/Pacific Islander children have a significantly lower incidence. Moreover, the incidence of acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloid leukemia appear to be significantly increasing among Hispanic children, predominantly among females, but not among non-Hispanic white children.

    3. Disease Site

      Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma
      Highly personalized detection of minimal Ewing sarcoma disease burden from plasma tumor DNA

      Masanori Hayashi, David Chu, Christian F. Meyer, Nicolas J. Llosa, Gregory McCarty, Carol D. Morris, Adam S. Levin, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Catherine M. Albert, Diana A. Steppan, Ben Ho Park and David M. Loeb

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30144

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      By identifying the specific EWS-ETS breakpoint in patients with Ewing sarcoma, the authors were able to design a personalized plasma tumor DNA detection system using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. The number of detected breakpoint fragments correlated with tumor burden and metastatic disease recurrence in an animal model, and was piloted in 3 patients, demonstrating strong translational potential.

    4. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Vulnerable elders survey and socioeconomic status predict functional decline and death among older women with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic breast cancer

      Cynthia Owusu, Seunghee Margevicius, Mark Schluchter, Siran M. Koroukian, Kathryn H. Schmitz and Nathan A. Berger

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30046

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      Among older women with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic breast cancer, functional decline within 12 months of breast cancer treatment is highly prevalent, and women of lower educational status are disproportionately affected. The Vulnerable Elders Survey is a useful tool for the early identification of women at risk for functional decline.

    5. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Racial disparities in survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the targeted therapy era

      Tracy L. Rose, Allison M. Deal, Bhavani Krishnan, Matthew E. Nielsen, Angela B. Smith, William Y. Kim and Matthew I. Milowsky

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30146

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      Both African American and Caucasian patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma have had a significant improvement in survival since the advent of targeted therapy. However, African American patients maintain a survival disadvantage compared with Caucasian patients independent of treatment received.

  6. Editorial

    1. Human immunodeficiency virus lymphomas in the era of antiretrovirals: Is it finally time to change the discussion?

      Clifford J. Gunthel and Mary Jo Lechowicz

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30110

      Currently, clinicians involved in the treatment of and research regarding lymphoma may want to look toward achieving the goal of a dual cure of human immunodeficiency virus and cancer in patients with lymphoma. In addition, the difficult issues of health care disparities, disease prevention, and long-term survivorship need to be addressed in this population.

  7. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphomas in the antiretroviral therapy era: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base

      Adam J. Olszewski, Jaleh Fallah and Jorge J. Castillo

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30112

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      Most patients with newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus-associated lymphoma in the United States are black or Hispanic. The risk of not receiving chemotherapy is associated with sociodemographic characteristics and is significantly lower in higher volume or academic/research facilities. See also pages 000-000.

    2. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      Telehealth system: A randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of an internet-based exercise intervention on quality of life, pain, muscle strength, and fatigue in breast cancer survivors

      Noelia Galiano-Castillo, Irene Cantarero-Villanueva, Carolina Fernández-Lao, Angélica Ariza-García, Lourdes Díaz-Rodríguez, Rosario Del-Moral-Ávila and Manuel Arroyo-Morales

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30172

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      This is one of the most extensive randomized controlled trials to report effect sizes for telerehabilitation in breast cancer survivors using an adequate follow-up period. This nonface-to-face approach could help the growing number of cancer survivors who use information and communications technology as a delivery method.

  8. Erratum

    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30178

  9. Review Articles

    1. Adult brainstem gliomas

      Sylvia C. Eisele and David A. Reardon

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29920

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      Brainstem gliomas typically affect children and are uncommon among adults. Emerging molecular genetic data support the development of promising biologically based, novel treatment strategies for these challenging tumors.

  10. Erratum

    1. You have free access to this content
  11. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Time to the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy does not impact survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer

      Katelin A. Mirkin, Erin K. Greenleaf, Christopher S. Hollenbeak and Joyce Wong

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30163

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      The earlier initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy does not significantly impact long-term survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Because adjuvant chemotherapy confers a survival benefit, delayed chemotherapy should be offered when appropriate.

    2. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      Benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy among elderly women with T1-T2N0 estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

      Bree R. Eaton, Renjian Jiang, Mylin A. Torres, Shannon T. Kahn, Karen Godette, Timothy L. Lash and Kevin C. Ward

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30142

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      In this SEER-Medicare analysis of 3432 women aged ≥ 70 years with T1-2N0 estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the use of adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of mastectomy and breast cancer death. However, among the subgroup of women aged ≥80 years or with T1N0 tumors the absolute difference in the incidence of mastectomy with or without receipt of radiotherapy was small.

    3. Disease Site

      Breast Disease
      Breast intraductal papillomas without atypia in radiologic-pathologic concordant core-needle biopsies: Rate of upgrade to carcinoma at excision

      Fresia Pareja, Adriana D. Corben, Sandra B. Brennan, Melissa P. Murray, Zenica L. Bowser, Kiran Jakate, Christopher Sebastiano, Monica Morrow, Elizabeth A. Morris and Edi Brogi

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30118

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      The rate at which intraductal papillomas without atypia constituting the most serious finding in radiologic-pathologic concordant core-needle biopsy specimens are upgraded to carcinoma at surgical excision is low. Radiologic follow-up is appropriate management for these patients.

    4. Hematologic Malignancies
      Does FLT3 mutation impact survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia? A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) analysis

      Abhinav Deol, Salyka Sengsayadeth, Kwang Woo Ahn, Hai-Lin Wang, Mahmoud Aljurf, Joseph Harry Antin, Minoo Battiwalla, Martin Bornhauser, Jean-Yves Cahn, Bruce Camitta, Yi-Bin Chen, Corey S. Cutler, Robert Peter Gale, Siddhartha Ganguly, Mehdi Hamadani, Yoshihiro Inamoto, Madan Jagasia, Rammurti Kamble, John Koreth, Hillard M. Lazarus, Jane Liesveld, Mark R. Litzow, David I. Marks, Taiga Nishihori, Richard F. Olsson, Ran Reshef, Jacob M. Rowe, Ayman A. Saad, Mitchell Sabloff, Harry C. Schouten, Thomas C. Shea, Robert J. Soiffer, Geoffrey L. Uy, Edmond K. Waller, Peter H. Wiernik, Baldeep Wirk, Ann E. Woolfrey, Donald Bunjes, Steven Devine, Marcos de Lima, Brenda M. Sandmaier, Dan Weisdorf, Hanna Jean Khoury and Wael Saber

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30140

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      FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) mutation status does not have an impact on overall survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pre-emptive strategies to reduce relapse need to be investigated in patients who have FLT3 mutations to further improve outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    5. Breast Disease
      A randomized phase 2 study exploring the role of bevacizumab and a chemotherapy-free approach in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer: The HAT study (BOOG 2008-2003), a Dutch Breast Cancer Research Group trial

      Jan C. Drooger, Harm van Tinteren, Steffen M. de Groot, Albert J. ten Tije, Hiltje de Graaf, Johanneke E. A. Portielje, Agnes Jager, Aafke Honkoop, Sabine C. Linn, Judith R. Kroep, Frans L. G. Erdkamp, Paul Hamberg, Alex L. T. Imholz, Quirine C. van Rossum-Schornagel, Joan B. Heijns, A. Elise van Leeuwen-Stok and Stefan Sleijfer

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30141

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      Results from this study suggest that bevacizumab adds clinically relevant antitumor activity to certain trastuzumab-based regimens in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, metastatic breast cancer. In particular, a sequential approach with bevacizumab and trastuzumab, delaying the start of cytotoxic chemotherapy, is worth further exploration in studies incorporating newer HER2-targeted agents and endocrine therapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive disease.

    6. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      Randomized phase 2 neoadjuvant trial evaluating anastrozole and fulvestrant efficacy for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor–positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative breast cancer patients: Results of the UNICANCER CARMINA 02 French trial (UCBG 0609)

      Florence Lerebours, Sofia Rivera, Marie-Ange Mouret-Reynier, Severine Alran, Laurence Venat-Bouvet, Pierre Kerbrat, Remy Salmon, Veronique Becette, Céline Bourgier, Pascal Cherel, Véronique Boussion, Corinne Balleyguier, Fabienne Thibault, Sandrine Lavau-Denes, Jean-Marc Nabholz, Brigitte Sigal, Martine Trassard, Marie-Christine Mathieu, Anne-Laure Martin, Jerome Lemonnier and Emmanuelle Mouret-Fourme

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30143

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      Neoadjuvant anastrozole and fulvestrant are efficient and well tolerated in postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor–positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative breast cancer. The Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index status is significantly predictive of relapse-free survival.

    7. Efficacy and safety of dovitinib in pretreated patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer with FGFR1 amplification: A single-arm, phase 2 study

      Sung Hee Lim, Jong-Mu Sun, Yoon-La Choi, Hye Ryun Kim, Soomin Ahn, Ji Yun Lee, Se-Hoon Lee, Jin Seok Ahn, Keunchil Park, Joo Hang Kim, Byoung Chul Cho and Myung-Ju Ahn

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30135

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      Dovitinib demonstrates an objective response rate of 11.5% (95% confidence interval, 0.8%-23.8%) in patients with advanced squamous cell cancer of the lung whose tumors demonstrate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Further research to evaluate predictive biomarkers correlated with the efficacy of fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are needed. See also pages 000-000.

  12. Editorial

    1. Missing the mark in FGFR1-amplified squamous cell cancer of the lung

      Paul K. Paik and Charles M. Rudin

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30131

      In contrast to targeted therapy development in lung adenocarcinoma, trials targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in squamous cell lung cancers generally have been disappointing. Gene amplification or overexpression of this target may not be a sufficiently robust predictor of efficacy for FGFR1 inhibitors. See also pages 000-000.

  13. Review Articles

    1. Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors to prevent relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A position statement of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

      Sebastian Giebel, Anna Czyz, Oliver Ottmann, Frederic Baron, Eolia Brissot, Fabio Ciceri, Jan J. Cornelissen, Jordi Esteve, Norbert-Claude Gorin, Bipin Savani, Christoph Schmid, Mohamad Mohty and Arnon Nagler

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30130

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      Tyrosine kinase inhibitor maintenance therapy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been demonstrated to reduce the risk of relapse of Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This consensus paper, written on behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, presents an overview of the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and proposes recommendations regarding the choice of tyrosine kinase inhibitor, treatment timing, and dosage.

    2. Endometrial cancer: Not your grandmother's cancer

      Jessica N. McAlpine, Sarah M. Temkin and Helen J. Mackay

      Version of Record online: 16 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30094

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      An exciting new era of endometrial cancer research and clinical management has begun that incorporates biologically and clinically relevant genomic and clinicopathologic parameters. Continued collaborative research efforts and funding are essential if we are to advance our understanding of this disease and improve clinical outcomes.

  14. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      Longitudinal analysis of patient-reported outcomes and cosmesis in a randomized trial of conventionally fractionated versus hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation

      Cameron W. Swanick, Xiudong Lei, Simona F. Shaitelman, Pamela J. Schlembach, Elizabeth S. Bloom, Michelle C. Fingeret, Eric A. Strom, Welela Tereffe, Wendy A. Woodward, Michael C. Stauder, Tomas Dvorak, Alastair M. Thompson, Thomas A. Buchholz and Benjamin D. Smith

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30121

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      In the current study, the authors assess longitudinal patient-reported outcomes and physician-rated cosmesis in a randomized trial of conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation plus boost versus hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation plus boost for the adjuvant treatment of patients with early-stage breast cancer. The treatment arm appears to have no significant effect on longitudinal outcomes, and patient-reported functional and pain outcomes improve with time.

    2. Disease Site

      Chest and Lung Disease
      Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and use of low-dose computed tomography for lung cancer screening among family physicians

      Jennifer L. Ersek, Jan M. Eberth, Karen Kane McDonnell, Scott M. Strayer, Erica Sercy, Kathleen B. Cartmell and Daniela B. Friedman

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29944

      Most family physicians report discussing low-dose computed tomography with patients at high risk for lung cancer; however, referrals remain low. Gaps in physician knowledge about screening guidelines, eligibility criteria, and insurance reimbursement persist.

    3. Breast Disease
      Nonamplification ERBB2 genomic alterations in 5605 cases of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer: An emerging opportunity for anti-HER2 targeted therapies

      Jeffrey S. Ross, Laurie M. Gay, Kai Wang, Siraj M. Ali, Saranya Chumsri, Julia A. Elvin, Ron Bose, Jo-Anne Vergilio, James Suh, Roman Yelensky, Doron Lipson, Juliann Chmielecki, Stanley Waintraub, Brian Leyland-Jones, Vincent A. Miller and Philip J. Stephens

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30102

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      Nonamplification ERBB2 mutations cannot be detected by standard-of-care immunohistochemistry or fluorescence in situ hybridization, although the presence of these alterations may predict response to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-targeted therapy. In a series of 5605 metastatic breast cancers, 2.4% of all cases and 20% of cases with ERBB2 alterations were found to harbor nonamplification mutations, which represents a substantial patient population who may benefit from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-targeted therapies.

  15. Correspondence

  16. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      Timing and type of immune checkpoint therapy affect the early radiographic response of melanoma brain metastases to stereotactic radiosurgery

      Jack M. Qian, James B. Yu, Harriet M. Kluger and Veronica L. S. Chiang

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30138

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      For melanoma brain metastases, immune checkpoint therapy administered within 4 weeks of stereotactic radiosurgery is more effective than treatment separated by more than 4 weeks. In addition, anti–programmed cell death protein 1 therapy increases the lesional response to stereotactic radiosurgery in comparison with anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4.

    2. Disparities Research
      Racial disparities in the survival of American children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma

      Justine M. Kahn, Theresa H.M. Keegan, Li Tao, Renata Abrahão, Archie Bleyer and Aaron D. Viny

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30089

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      A retrospective analysis of 4 decades of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data show that although survival for children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma has improved, differences persist between black, white, and Hispanic children, adolescents, and young adults. Survival disparities between black and white children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been nearly eliminated.

  17. Correspondence

    1. Reply to smoking cessation for patients with cancer: “The Emperor's New Clothes”

      Apoorva T. Ramaswamy, Benjamin Toll, Anees B. Chagpar and Benjamin L. Judson

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30152

  18. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Survivorship
      Cigarette smoking, comorbidity, and general health among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer

      Sapna Kaul, Sreenivas P. Veeranki, Ana M. Rodriguez and Yong-Fang Kuo

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30086

      Survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer are more likely to smoke cigarettes than a comparison group. Cigarette smoking among survivors is associated with comorbidity and poor or fair general health. The majority of survivors start smoking before diagnosis, and nearly 40% of current smokers report not having smoking-related discussions with health professionals in the previous year.

    2. Patterns and predictors of clustered risky health behaviors among adult survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

      E. Anne Lown, Nobuko Hijiya, Nan Zhang, Deo Kumar Srivastava, Wendy M. Leisenring, Paul C. Nathan, Sharon M. Castellino, Katie A. Devine, Kimberley Dilley, Kevin R. Krull, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Melissa M. Hudson, Gregory T. Armstrong, Leslie L. Robison and Kirsten K. Ness

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30106

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      Herein, the authors identify 3 health behavior clusters among survivors of childhood cancer and their siblings. Psychological distress and economic and educational disadvantages should be considered when designing interventions to address risky health behaviors in this population.

  19. Review Articles

    1. You have free access to this content
      Understanding the contribution of family history to colorectal cancer risk and its clinical implications: A state-of-the-science review

      Jan T. Lowery, Dennis J. Ahnen, Paul C. Schroy III, Heather Hampel, Nancy Baxter, C. Richard Boland, Randall W. Burt, Lynn Butterly, Megan Doerr, Mary Doroshenk, W. Gregory Feero, Nora Henrikson, Uri Ladabaum, David Lieberman, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Susan K. Peterson, Martha Raymond, N. Jewel Samadder, Sapna Syngal, Thomas K. Weber, Ann G. Zauber and Robert Smith

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30080

      Persons with a family history of colorectal cancer or adenomas have an increased risk for colorectal cancer, yet they are not adequately screened according to consensus guidelines. The mitigation of barriers to screening through improved identification of these individuals, the education of providers and patients about risk and screening recommendations, the encouragement of family communication, and the implementation of practice-based interventions are needed to reduce the burden of colorectal cancer in these families. See also pages 000-000.

  20. Editorial

    1. You have free access to this content
      Family history matters

      Marie E. Wood

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30078

      Targeting individuals at increased risk for colon cancer will ensure that those most at risk for the disease will benefit; a family history is an easily identifiable risk factor for colon cancer. The review by Lowery et al. in this issue of Cancer highlights both the importance of taking a family history for identifying those at risk for colorectal cancer and the barriers to effectively using family history information to manage individuals at risk. See also pages 000-000.

  21. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Genetic testing for the risk of developing late effects among survivors of childhood cancer: Consumer understanding, acceptance, and willingness to pay

      Gabrielle Georgiou, Claire E. Wakefield, Brittany C. McGill, Joanna E. Fardell, Christina Signorelli, Lucy Hanlon, Kathy Tucker, Andrea F. Patenaude and Richard J. Cohn

      Version of Record online: 3 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30119

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      Survivors of childhood cancer and their parents describe a positive interest in genetic testing for the risk of developing late effects. Perceived benefits appear to outweigh harms, and the majority of participants would be willing to pay, and wait, for such testing.

  22. Editorials

    1. Improving the patient experience in the delivery of high quality surgical care and health outcomes

      Simon P. Kim and Robert Abouassaly

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30076

      With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have placed a greater degree of emphasis on value for health care delivery by focusing on improving health outcomes and quality and lowering costs. In this issue of Cancer, Shirk et al examine the relationship between the patient-centered experience and hospital outcomes for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, nephrectomy, and cystectomy for genitourinary malignancies. See also pages 000-000.

  23. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Patient experience and quality of urologic cancer surgery in US hospitals

      Joseph D. Shirk, Hung-Jui Tan, Jim C. Hu, Christopher S. Saigal and Mark S. Litwin

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30081

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      Patient experience is increasingly tied to reimbursement, but the correlation with surgical quality is unclear. In the current study, the authors demonstrate a limited association between patient experience and surgical outcomes for those individuals undergoing surgery for genitourinary cancer, suggesting that these domains remain separate when used to evaluate provider performance. See also pages 000-000.

  24. Communication

    1. Childhood cancer survivorship research in minority populations: A position paper from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

      Smita Bhatia, Todd M. Gibson, Kirsten K. Ness, Qi Liu, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Kevin R. Krull, Paul C. Nathan, Joseph P. Neglia, Wendy Leisenring, Yutaka Yasui, Leslie L. Robison and Gregory T. Armstrong

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30072

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      Herein, the authors describe population trends by race and ethnicity, highlight racial/ethnic differences in childhood cancer incidence and mortality, and explore the potential role of socioeconomic status (income, education, insurance, and health care use) and behavioral contributors to racial/ethnic differences in the burden of morbidity. Finally, they outline challenges in conducting race/ethnicity-specific childhood cancer survivorship research.

  25. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Cost-effectiveness of alternative colonoscopy surveillance strategies to mitigate metachronous colorectal cancer incidence

      Fatih Safa Erenay, Oguzhan Alagoz, Ritesh Banerjee, Adnan Said and Robert R. Cima

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30091

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      This study identifies cost-effective alternative colonoscopy surveillance strategies by evaluating all clinically reasonable surveillance strategies with a computer-simulation model. The results illustrate that slightly increasing the surveillance intensity of the US guideline may significantly improve health outcomes while moderately increasing surveillance costs.

    2. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Impact of hypofractionated and standard fractionated chemoradiation before pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

      Jordan M. Cloyd, Christopher H. Crane, Eugene J. Koay, Prajnan Das, Sunil Krishnan, Laura Prakash, Rebecca A. Snyder, Gauri R. Varadhachary, Robert A. Wolff, Milind Javle, Rachna T. Shroff, David Fogelman, Michael Overman, Huamin Wang, Anirban Maitra, Jeffrey E. Lee, Jason B. Fleming and Matthew H. G. Katz

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30117

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      In this single-institution review of patients undergoing preoperative therapy before pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the administration of hypofractionated chemoradiation is associated with margin-negative resection rates, treatment effect, locoregional recurrence, and overall survival similar to those associated with standard fractionated chemoradiation. The use of either preoperative chemoradiation regimen is associated with improved locoregional control (but not overall survival) in comparison with systemic chemotherapy alone.

    3. Head and Neck Disease
      Comparative effectiveness of surgical and nonsurgical therapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

      Chun Chieh Lin, Stacey A. Fedewa, Kara K. Prickett, Kristin A. Higgins and Amy Y. Chen

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30122

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      Complete chemoradiation (CRT) for advanced laryngeal cancer was found to have a similar survival benefit to that of surgery. However, a substantial percentage of patients who initiated CRT did not complete the course. Although CRT provides organ preservation, the benefits and trade-offs between the treatments and the importance of completing the full course of CRT should be fully discussed with patients.

    4. Breast Disease
      Emerging trends in surgical and adjuvant radiation therapies among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ

      Oyewale O. Shiyanbola, Brian L. Sprague, John M. Hampton, Kim Dittus, Ted A. James, Sally Herschorn, Ronald E. Gangnon, Donald L. Weaver and Amy Trentham-Dietz

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30105

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      Recommended guidelines highlight a conservative approach to the management of ductal carcinoma in situ. According to data for women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ in the National Cancer Data Base, the use of adjuvant radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery has plateaued since 2007, and mastectomy, including reconstruction and removal of the contralateral breast, has increased with demographic variation. See also pages 000-000.

  26. Editorial

    1. Ductal carcinoma in situ: How much is too much?

      Keerthi Gogineni

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30107

      In this issue of Cancer, Shiyanbola et al describe changing trends in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ. Their findings reinforce the need for research into the natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ that may enable women with low-risk lesions to undergo less invasive treatment. See also pages 000-000.

  27. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Malignancy-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults: Relation to hemophagocytosis, characteristics, and outcomes

      Gevorg N. Tamamyan, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Jing Ning, Preetesh Jain, Koji Sasaki, Kenneth L. McClain, Carl E. Allen, Sherry A. Pierce, Jorge E. Cortes, Farhad Ravandi, Marina Y. Konopleva, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Christopher B. Benton, Dai Chihara, Michael E. Rytting, Sa Wang, Waleed Abdelall, Sergej N. Konoplev and Naval G. Daver

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30084

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      Malignancy-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in adults is frequently associated with hematologic malignancies, and the outcomes are dismal. In this retrospective, single-institute study, the authors analyze the characteristics of 61 adult patients with pathologic evidence of hemophagocytosis and identified new variables that which may aid in the diagnosis of malignancy-associated HLH. The results also confirm the poor outcomes in patients with malignancy-associated HLH.

    2. Gastrointestinal Disease
      Increased incidence of FBXW7 and POLE proofreading domain mutations in young adult colorectal cancers

      Nishi Kothari, Jamie K. Teer, Andrea M. Abbott, Thejal Srikumar, Yonghong Zhang, Sean J. Yoder, Andrew S. Brohl, Richard D. Kim, Damon R. Reed and David Shibata

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30082

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      The authors describe their original research involving exome sequencing of patients with colorectal cancer in which younger patients were compared with older patients. A unique genetic profile is identified for younger patients that may have implications on future screening and treatment paradigms for these patients.

    3. Hepatobiliary Disease
      Codon 13 KRAS mutation predicts patterns of recurrence in patients undergoing hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases

      Georgios A. Margonis, Yuhree Kim, Kazunari Sasaki, Mario Samaha, Neda Amini and Timothy M. Pawlik

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30085

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      Overall KRAS mutation is not associated with recurrence-free survival in patients who undergo resection of CRLM. However, KRAS codon 13 mutations are associated with a higher risk for overall extrahepatic recurrence and lung-specific recurrence.

    4. Gynecologic Oncology
      Accuracy of urinary human papillomavirus testing for the presence of cervical human papillomaviruses and higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

      Chandrika J. Piyathilake, Suguna Badiga, Michelle M. Chambers, Ilene K. Brill, Roland Matthews and Edward E. Partridge

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30123

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      The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of urinary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for the presence of cervical HPVs and higher grade cervical intraepithelial lesions. The results demonstrate that urinary HPV testing provides highly satisfactory results for excluding the possibility of any cervical HPV infections, including HPV types not included in vaccines and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions associated with any high-risk HPV, regardless of a woman's age, race, or excess body weight.

    5. Discipline

      Symptom Control and Palliative Care
      Helping parents live with the hole in their heart: The role of health care providers and institutions in the bereaved parents' grief journeys

      Jennifer M. Snaman, Erica C. Kaye, Carlos Torres, Deborah V. Gibson and Justin N. Baker

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30087

      Parents of children who die often experience significant psychosocial and health sequelae and may benefit from ongoing support and resources throughout their grief journey. In this article, bereaved parents identify the quintessential components of bereavement support that they believe should be provided by individual members of the medical team and by the institution as a whole.

  28. Correspondence

  29. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Racial and ethnic differences in patient navigation: Results from the Patient Navigation Research Program

      Naomi Y. Ko, Frederick R. Snyder, Peter C. Raich, Electra D. Paskett, Donald J. Dudley, Ji-Hyun Lee, Paul H. Levine and Karen M. Freund

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30109

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      The current study explores whether patient navigation reduces racial and ethnic differences in the time to diagnostic resolution of a cancer screening abnormality. The study demonstrates that patient navigation significantly reduces the median time to diagnostic resolution in black participants, although the reduction does not appear to entirely eliminate disparities between this and other racial and ethnic groups.

    2. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Use, complications, and costs of stereotactic body radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

      Joshua A. Halpern, Art Sedrakyan, Wei-Chun Hsu, Jialin Mao, Timothy J. Daskivich, Paul L. Nguyen, Encouse B. Golden, Josephine Kang and Jim C. Hu

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30101

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      The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and proton beam therapy for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer in the United States has increased over time. Despite men of lower stage undergoing SBRT, SBRT appears to be associated with greater toxicity but lower health care costs compared with other radiotherapies.

    3. Breast Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      An observational study to examine changes in metabolic syndrome components in patients with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy

      Christina M. Dieli-Conwright, Louise Wong, Sarah Waliany, Leslie Bernstein, Behrouz Salehian and Joanne E. Mortimer

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30104

      Patients with breast cancer who receive (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy experience an impaired metabolic presentation as noted by worsened components of metabolic syndrome, anthropometrics, and biomarkers of glucose metabolism. Lifestyle interventions such as diet and exercise may be preventive approaches for use during chemotherapy to reduce the onset of metabolic syndrome in patients with breast cancer.

    4. Gastrointestinal Disease
      Predicting advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy in a diverse population with the National Cancer Institute colorectal cancer risk-assessment tool

      Uri Ladabaum, Ashley Patel, Ajitha Mannalithara, Vandana Sundaram, Aya Mitani and Manisha Desai

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30096

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      The National Cancer Institute colorectal cancer risk-assessment tool, which was designed to predict future colorectal cancer risk, displays modest discriminatory accuracy in predicting advanced neoplasia at screening colonoscopy in a diverse population. This tool may aid shared decision-making in clinical practice.

    5. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Parental preparedness for late effects and long-term quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer

      Katie A. Greenzang, Angel M. Cronin and Jennifer W. Mack

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30092

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      The parents of children with cancer believe themselves to be prepared to manage their child's cancer treatment, but they feel less prepared for survivorship. High-quality communication with providers may help parents to feel more prepared for their child's life after cancer therapy.

    6. Diagnostic Imaging
      Second-opinion interpretations of neuroimaging studies by oncologic neuroradiologists can help reduce errors in cancer care

      Vaios Hatzoglou, Antonio M. Omuro, Sofia Haque, Yasmin Khakoo, Ian Ganly, Jung Hun Oh, Amita Shukla-Dave, Robin Fatovic, Joshua Gaal and Andrei I. Holodny

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30083

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      Delivering the highest quality of cancer care is an important issue and must continue to be emphasized. Second-opinion interpretations of neuroimaging studies by subspecialized oncologic neuroradiologists reduce error and optimize the care of cancer patients.

    7. Radiation Oncology
      PMH 9907: Long-term outcomes of a randomized phase 3 study of short-term bicalutamide hormone therapy and dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

      Andrew J. McPartlin, Rachel Glicksman, Melania Pintilie, Debbie Tsuji, Gary Mok, Andrew Bayley, Peter Chung, Robert G. Bristow, Mary K. Gospodarowicz, Charles N. Catton, Michael Milosevic and Padraig R. Warde

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30093

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      The PMH 9907 trial was a randomized study assessing the outcome of dose-escalated external-beam radiotherapy with or without 5 months neoadjuvant and concurrent bicalutamide 150 mg once daily for 252 patients with localized prostate cancer. After a median follow-up of 9.1 years, a nonsignificant 7% difference in the biochemical failure rate is reported in favor of combination therapy.

    8. Outcomes Research
      Early impact of Medicare accountable care organizations on cancer surgery outcomes

      Lindsey A. Herrel, Edward C. Norton, Scott R. Hawken, Zaojun Ye, Brent K. Hollenbeck and David C. Miller

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30111

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      Early hospital participation in the accountable care organization program of the Medicare Shared Savings Program is not associated with greater reductions in adverse perioperative outcomes for patients undergoing a major cancer surgery in comparison with control hospitals. The longitudinal improvements in perioperative outcomes identified during the study interval may reflect the impact of concurrent policies more directly applicable to surgical patients.

    9. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Colorectal cancer screening: Estimated future colonoscopy need and current volume and capacity

      Djenaba A. Joseph, Reinier G. S. Meester, Ann G. Zauber, Diane L. Manninen, Linda Winges, Fred B. Dong, Brandy Peaker and Marjolein van Ballegooijen

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30070

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      There is sufficient colonoscopy capacity to screen 80% of the eligible US population with fecal immunochemical testing, colonoscopy, or a mix of tests.

    10. Increased tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy among rectal cancer patients taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers

      Zachary S. Morris, Sandeep Saha, William J. Magnuson, Brett A. Morris, Jenna F. Borkenhagen, Alisa Ching, Gayle Hirose, Vanesa McMurry, David M. Francis, Paul M. Harari, Rick Chappell, Stuart Tsuji and Mark A. Ritter

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30079

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      The incidental use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers among rectal cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant radiotherapy is associated with an increased rate of pathological complete response. This finding is verified in a second independent database, and a multivariate aggregate analysis shows that the use of these medications is a strong predictor of a pathologic complete response.

    11. Hematologic Malignancies
      Double epigenetic modulation of high-dose chemotherapy with azacitidine and vorinostat for patients with refractory or poor-risk relapsed lymphoma

      Yago Nieto, Benigno C. Valdez, Peter F. Thall, Roy B. Jones, Wei Wei, Alan Myers, Chitra Hosing, Sairah Ahmed, Uday Popat, Elizabeth J. Shpall, Muzaffar Qazilbash, Alison Gulbis, Paolo Anderlini, Nina Shah, Qaiser Bashir, Amin Alousi, Yasuhiro Oki, Michelle Fanale, Bouthaina Dabaja, Chelsea Pinnix, Richard Champlin and Borje S. Andersson

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30100

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      With the objective of developing more active high-dose chemotherapy for patients with refractory or high-risk relapsed lymphomas, infusional gemcitabine/busulfan/melphalan is combined with vorinostat and azacitidine (which enhanced antitumor activity in preclinical work). This clinical trial demonstrates that double epigenetic modulation of high-dose chemotherapy is safe and highly active in patients with refractory lymphomas.

    12. Discipline

      Radiation Oncology
      Clinical and molecular markers of long-term survival after oligometastasis-directed stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)

      Anthony C. Wong, Sydeaka P. Watson, Sean P. Pitroda, Christina H. Son, Lauren C. Das, Melinda E. Stack, Abhineet Uppal, Go Oshima, Nikolai N. Khodarev, Joseph K. Salama, Ralph R. Weichselbaum and Steven J. Chmura

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30058

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      Predictors of outcomes in oligometastatic patients treated with ablative stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) are poorly defined. We report that breast cancer histology and slow progression are associated with longer survival in this long-term update of a prospective SBRT dose escalation trial, and we propose a microRNA classifier that may help select oligometastatic patients with better prognosis.

    13. Psychosocial Oncology
      Peer-counseling for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer: A randomized community/research collaboration trial

      Janine Giese-Davis, Caroline Bliss-Isberg, Lynne Wittenberg, Jennifer White, Path Star, Lihong Zhong, Matthew J. Cordova, Debra Houston and David Spiegel

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30036

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      The findings of the current randomized controlled trial indicate that, compared with controls, a peer-counseling intervention significantly improves quality of life and maintains marital adjustment in patients with breast cancer. Having a peer counselor may prevent or improve psychosocial morbidity after diagnosis.

  30. Correspondence

    1. Reply to the association between religion/spirituality and mental health in cancer

      John M. Salsman, James E. Pustejovsky, Crystal L. Park, Allen C. Sherman, Thomas V. Merluzzi, Suzanne C. Danhauer, Heather S.L. Jim and George Fitchett

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30019

  31. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      A phase 1 study of buparlisib and bevacizumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma progressing on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapies

      Rana R. McKay, Guillermo De Velasco, Lillian Werner, Joaquim Bellmunt, Lauren Harshman, Christopher Sweeney, Jonathan E. Rosenberg, Michelle Hirsch, Sabina Signoretti, Eliezer M. Van Allen, Meghara Walsh, Ulka Vaishampayan, David F. McDermott and Toni K. Choueiri

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30056

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      The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is dysregulated in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), and targeting this pathway, in addition to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, is a potential therapeutic strategy in the management of RCC. Buparlisib at a dose of 80 mg/day with bevacizumab appears to be a tolerable regimen with preliminary activity in patients with vascular endothelial growth factor-refractory mRCC.

  32. Review Articles

    1. Role of isolated limb perfusion with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor α and melphalan in locally advanced extremity soft tissue sarcoma

      Jens Jakob and Peter Hohenberger

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29991

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      Isolated limb perfusion with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor α and melphalan is a highly effective regional treatment for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma. This review critically discusses the indication for isolated limb perfusion with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor α and melphalan.

  33. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Hepatobiliary Disease
      Race/ethnicity-specific disparities in cancer incidence, burden of disease, and overall survival among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States

      John Ha, Melissa Yan, Maria Aguilar, Taft Bhuket, Michele M. Tana, Benny Liu, Robert G. Gish and Robert J. Wong

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30103

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      Asians have the highest incidence and prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States. Although non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics all had increasing incidence of HCC from 2003 to 2011, Asians had a declining incidence and a shift from advanced HCC to earlier stage HCC as a result of improved HCC screening and surveillance efforts. See also pages 000-000.

    2. Head and Neck Disease
      Capecitabine and lapatinib for the first-line treatment of metastatic/recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

      Jared M. Weiss, Stephen Bagley, Wei-Ting Hwang, Joshua Bauml, Juneko Grilley Olson, Roger B. Cohen, David Neil Hayes and Corey Langer

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30067

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      In the current study, patients receiving first-line treatment of metastatic/recurrent head and neck squamous cell cancer were treated with the all-oral regimen of capecitabine and lapatinib. The median progression-free survival was 4.2 months and the median overall survival was 10.7 months.

  34. Editorial

    1. Hepatocellular carcinoma: How can we move from racial/ethnic disparities to a model of health equity?

      Amit G. Singal and Adam C. Yopp

      Version of Record online: 19 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30099

      A study by Ha and colleagues in this issue adds to the evidence base demonstrating racial and ethnic health disparities in health care. However, the evidence base for developing interventions to eliminate these disparities is limited, largely because of a lack of granularity in the available administrative data sets. See also pages 000-000.

  35. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      Open-label, multicenter, phase 1 study of alisertib (MLN8237), an aurora A kinase inhibitor, with docetaxel in patients with solid tumors

      Julie N. Graff, Celestia S. Higano, Noah M. Hahn, Matthew H. Taylor, Bin Zhang, Xiaofei Zhou, Karthik Venkatakrishnan, E. Jane Leonard and John Sarantopoulos

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30073

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      Alisertib is an aurora A kinase and may enhance the activity of the taxane docetaxel. The combination of alisertib and taxane is tolerable and shows activity across various cancer types.

    2. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Evaluation of the effectiveness of adding androgen deprivation to modern dose-escalated radiotherapy for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer

      Aaron D. Falchook, Ramsankar Basak, Jahan J. Mohiuddin and Ronald C. Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30049

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      Among patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer, there are no differences in overall survival for men who receive androgen-deprivation therapy with dose-escalated radiotherapy and men who receive dose-escalated radiotherapy alone; these findings remain after stratification by age and comorbidity. Dose-escalated radiotherapy alone without androgen-deprivation therapy may be an appropriate treatment for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer. See also pages 000-000.

  36. Editorial

    1. Androgen deprivation therapy use and risk of death in men treated with high-dose radiation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

      Florence K. Keane and Anthony V. D'Amico

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30048

      Men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer have excellent outcomes in comparison with men with unfavorable intermediate-risk disease. In this issue of Cancer, Falchook et al report the largest study to date of men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy with or without androgen deprivation therapy. They demonstrate that overall survival is not associated with the use of androgen deprivation therapy and provide level 2 evidence to suggest the exclusion of androgen deprivation therapy in this population. See also pages 000–000.

  37. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Disparities in cancer treatment among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus

      Gita Suneja, Chun Chieh Lin, Edgar P. Simard, Xuesong Han, Eric A. Engels and Ahmedin Jemal

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30052

      Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with cancer in the United States are less likely to receive cancer treatment compared with their uninfected counterparts, even after factoring in differences in insurance status and medical comorbidities. This disparity needs to be addressed as survival from HIV continues to improve and cancer becomes one of the leading causes of death in the HIV population.

    2. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Outcomes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with first-line idelalisib plus rituximab after cessation of treatment for toxicity

      Philip A. Thompson, Francesco Stingo, Michael J. Keating, Alessandra Ferrajoli, Jan A. Burger, William G. Wierda, Tapan M. Kadia and Susan M. O'Brien

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30069

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      Toxicity, likely immunologically mediated, is the major limitation to achieving long-term remission during first-line treatment with idelalisib plus rituximab for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Overall survival is favorable despite the high rate of treatment cessation caused by toxicity.

    3. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Increased incidence but improved median overall survival for biliary tract cancers diagnosed in Ontario from 1994 through 2012: A population-based study

      Jennifer A. Flemming, Jina Zhang-Salomons, Sulaiman Nanji and Christopher M. Booth

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30074

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      The incidence of biliary tract cancer is increasing in Ontario. However, this increase is associated with an increase in median overall survival and the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Advances in the surgical and medical management of these tumors are hypothesized to account for this improvement in survival.

    4. Outcomes Research
      Influence of the treatment facility volume on the survival of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

      Ronald S. Go, Mohammed Al-Hamadani, Nilay D. Shah, Cynthia S. Crowson, Sara J. Holton and Elizabeth B. Habermann

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30038

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      Non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated at higher volume facilities survive longer than those treated at lower volume facilities. This volume-outcome relation persists even after adjustments for case-mix differences.

  38. Review Articles

    1. The role of 5-aminolevulinic acid in enhancing surgery for high-grade glioma, its current boundaries, and future perspectives: A systematic review

      Alireza Mansouri, Sheila Mansouri, Laureen D. Hachem, George Klironomos, Michael A. Vogelbaum, Mark Bernstein and Gelareh Zadeh

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30088

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      The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid as a surgical adjunct for high-grade glioma surgery improves tumor visualization and thus enables a greater extent of resection. However, additional adjuncts may be necessary for maximizing specificity of resection and patient safety.

  39. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Long-term soy consumption and tumor tissue MicroRNA and gene expression in triple-negative breast cancer

      Xingyi Guo, Qiuyin Cai, Pingping Bao, Jie Wu, Wanqing Wen, Fei Ye, Wei Zheng, Ying Zheng and Xiao-Ou Shu

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29981

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      Soy food consumption may influence the risk and prognosis of breast cancer by altering the expression of cancer-related microRNAs and genes.

    2. Pediatric Oncology
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fertility preservation in children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer: Quality of clinical practice guidelines and variations in recommendations

      Anna Font-Gonzalez, Renée L. Mulder, Erik A.H. Loeffen, Julianne Byrne, Eline van Dulmen-den Broeder, Marry M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Melissa M. Hudson, Lisa B. Kenney, Jennifer M. Levine, Wim J.E. Tissing, Marianne D. van de Wetering, Leontien C. M. Kremer and on behalf of the PanCareLIFE Consortium

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30047

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      Only approximately one-third of the identified clinical practice guidelines for fertility preservation in children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer were found to be of sufficient quality, and among these, the recommendations varied substantially. This finding supports the need for well-developed and transparent harmonized clinical practice guidelines for children and young adults diagnosed with cancer who are at risk of fertility impairment.

    3. Supportive Care
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Efficacy of the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist rolapitant in preventing nausea and vomiting in patients receiving carboplatin-based chemotherapy

      Paul J. Hesketh, Ian D. Schnadig, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Manuel R. Modiano, Karin Jordan, Sujata Arora, Dan Powers and Matti Aapro

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30054

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      The efficacy of rolapitant, a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist with a long duration of action, was examined in a subgroup of 401 patients with cancer who received carboplatin-based chemotherapy in a phase 3 trial. In this population, a single oral dose of rolapitant (180 mg) combined with granisetron and dexamethasone provided statistically superior protection against chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in the delayed and overall phases in comparison with granisetron and dexamethasone alone, and it was well tolerated.

    4. Clinical Trials
      Phase 2 study of intensified chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

      Amir T. Fathi, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Kristen E. Stevenson, Jonathan E. Kolitz, Julie D. Asch, Philip C. Amrein, Eyal C. Attar, David P. Steensma, Martha Wadleigh, Julia Foster, Christine Connolly, Ilene Galinsky, Craig E. Devoe, Richard M. Stone, Donna S. Neuberg and Karen K. Ballen

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30037

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      The intensification of chemotherapy for older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can result in improved outcomes in comparison with historical data. Intensification may be appropriate for sufficiently robust older patients with Philadelphia chromosome–negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    5. Radiation Oncology
      Use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the United States from 2004 through 2012

      Brock R. Baker, Ramsankar Basak, Jahan J. Mohiuddin and Ronald C. Chen

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30034

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      To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first to report on the adoption of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer across the United States. The adoption of SBRT appears to be highest in patients with low-risk or intermediate-risk disease, a finding that is in accordance with the bulk of patients included in published SBRT studies.

  40. Review Articles

    1. Improving the quality of survivorship for older adults with cancer

      Supriya G. Mohile, Arti Hurria, Harvey J. Cohen, Julia H. Rowland, Corinne R. Leach, Neeraj K. Arora, Beverly Canin, Hyman B. Muss, Allison Magnuson, Marie Flannery, Lisa Lowenstein, Heather G. Allore, Karen M. Mustian, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Martine Extermann, Betty Ferrell, Sharon K. Inouye, Stephanie A. Studenski and William Dale

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30053

      Research priorities for older adults with cancer include the development and implementation of intervention trials. Trials for older adults with cancer should: 1) rigorously test interventions to prevent the decline of or improve health status, especially interventions focused on optimizing physical performance, nutritional status, and cognition while undergoing cancer treatment; 2) use standardized care plans based on geriatric assessment findings to guide targeted interventions; and 3) incorporate the principles of geriatrics into survivorship care plans.

  41. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Supportive Care
      Refinement and revalidation of the demoralization scale: The DS-II—internal validity

      Sophie Robinson, David. W. Kissane, Joanne Brooker, Natasha Michael, Jane Fischer, Michael Franco, Courtney Hempton, Merlina Sulistio, Julie F. Pallant, David M. Clarke and Sue Burney

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30015

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      The Demoralization Scale-II is a self-report scale comprising 16 items and 2 components. It is an improved and more practically attractive measure of demoralization. See also pages 000–000.

    2. Disease Site

      Neuro-Oncology
      Concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for “biopsy-only” glioblastoma multiforme

      Adam J. Kole, Henry S. Park, Debra N. Yeboa, Charles E. Rutter, Christopher D. Corso, Sanjay Aneja, Nataniel H. Lester-Coll, Brandon R. Mancini, Jonathan P. Knisely and James B. Yu

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30063

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      Data are limited regarding optimal treatments for patients who undergo “biopsy-only” for glioblastoma multiforme. Outcomes after concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone are examined for “biopsy-only” glioblastoma multiforme using a large national database.

  42. Editorial

    1. Demoralization syndrome: New insights in psychosocial cancer care

      Luigi Grassi and Maria Giulia Nanni

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30022

      Demoralization is confirmed as a significant clinical dimension that needs to be part of the vision physicians should have when treating cancer patients. It is not a psychiatric disease but the expression of an unfolding, situational existence already involved in an irreducibly complex social world, in which cancer and its consequences as traumatic stressors impact the patient's experience and feelings, inducing a profound sense of emotional suffering. See also pages 000-000.

  43. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Supportive Care
      Refinement and revalidation of the demoralization scale: The DS-II—external validity

      Sophie Robinson, David. W. Kissane, Joanne Brooker, Courtney Hempton, Natasha Michael, Jane Fischer, Michael Franco, Merlina Sulistio, David M. Clarke, Mehmet Ozmen and Susan Burney

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30012

      The Demoralization Scale-II demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity. A difference of 2 points in scores on the Demoralization Scale-II may be clinically meaningful. See also pages 000-000.

  44. Editorial

    1. Filling the gaps in knowledge and treatments for sexual health in young adult male cancer survivors

      Karen L. Syrjala

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29988

      Male survivors of childhood cancer will spend their entire adult lives with the late effects of treatment on their sexual health. A valuable article in this issue makes it clear that the sexual difficulties in these survivors, who most often are treated for hematologic malignancies like acute lymphoblastic leukemia, differ from those in men who are treated for prostate or testicular cancer, and their sexual function treatments must be adapted to fit those needs. See also pages 000-000.

  45. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Survivorship
      Sexual function in male long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

      Anu Haavisto, Markus Henriksson, Risto Heikkinen, Leena-Riitta Puukko-Viertomies and Kirsi Jahnukainen

      Version of Record online: 12 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29989

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      Male adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia report lower sexual functioning than controls, with current depressive symptoms, the absence of a relationship and, to a smaller extent, testicular size as an indication of gonadal damage from childhood antileukemia therapy as the most important predictive factors. There is a deeper decline in sexual functioning in the oldest age group of survivors compared with a control group. See also pages 000-000.

    2. Clinical Trials
      Vismodegib or cixutumumab in combination with standard chemotherapy for patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer: A trial of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E1508)

      Chandra P. Belani, Suzanne E. Dahlberg, Charles M. Rudin, Martin Fleisher, Helen X. Chen, Naoko Takebe, Mario R. Velasco Jr, William J. Tester, Keren Sturtz, Christine L. Hann, James C. Shanks, Manish Monga, Suresh S. Ramalingam and Joan H. Schiller

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30062

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      The addition of vismodegib or cixutumumab to cisplatin and etoposide for patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer does not demonstrate an overall benefit. A low baseline circulating tumor cell count is associated with an overall favorable prognosis for patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer.

    3. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Association of androgen metabolism gene polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk and androgen concentrations: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

      Douglas K. Price, Cindy H. Chau, Cathee Till, Phyllis J. Goodman, Robin J. Leach, Teresa L. Johnson-Pais, Ann W. Hsing, Ashraful Hoque, Howard L. Parnes, Jeannette M. Schenk, Catherine M. Tangen, Ian M. Thompson, Juergen K. V. Reichardt and William D. Figg

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30071

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      This case-control study from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial study demonstrates the significance of androgen metabolism in prostate cancer and suggests that genetic variations along the androgen pathway modify serum hormone concentrations, contributing to the risk of prostate cancer, and that subgroups of men may be more susceptible to the disease. Findings from this study provide further insight into the genetic etiology of the increased risk of high-grade cancer among men who receive treatment with finasteride.

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