Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 122 Issue 10

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Fadlo R. Khuri, MD

Impact Factor: 5.068

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 32/211 (Oncology)

Online ISSN: 1097-0142

Associated Title(s): Cancer Cytopathology, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

VIEW

  1. 1 - 56
  1. Correspondence

  2. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Prediagnostic aspirin use and mortality in women with stage I to III breast cancer: A cohort study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

      Marie C. Bradley, Amanda Black, Andrew N. Freedman and Thomas I. Barron

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30004

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      There is a growing body of evidence that aspirin may reduce the risk of cancer mortality; however, the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The results of the current study demonstrate, for what to the authors' knowledge is the first time, a statistically significant interaction between lymph node status at the time of diagnosis and prediagnostic aspirin use. The absence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis may indicate patients whose breast tumors have responded to prediagnostic aspirin use, and consequently is predictive of a survival benefit from aspirin use in these patients.

    2. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Stem cell transplantation compared with melphalan plus dexamethasone in the treatment of immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis

      Morie A. Gertz, Martha Q. Lacy, Angela Dispenzieri, Francis K. Buadi, David Dingli, Suzanne R. Hayman, Shaji K. Kumar, Nelson Leung, John Lust, S. Vincent Rajkumar, Stephen J. Russell, Vera J. Suman, Jennifer G. Le-Rademacher and William J. Hogan

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30051

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      Eighty-nine patients with biopsy-proven light-chain amyloidosis were allowed to select treatment with melphalan plus dexamethasone (n = 34) or stem cell transplantation (n = 55). Twenty-four matched triplet sets (2 stem cell transplant patients for each melphalan-dexamethasone patient) showed no difference in hematologic response, but survival was better after autologous stem cell transplantation.

    3. Discipline

      Psychosocial Oncology
      “Being a good patient” during times of illness as defined by adolescent patients with cancer

      Meaghann S. Weaver, Justin N. Baker, Jami S. Gattuso, Deborah V. Gibson and Pamela S. Hinds

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30033

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      Adolescents with cancer consider relational roles in their medical interactions, citing the opinions of others and impact on others as formative for their care preferences and decisions. This face-to-face interview study describes “good patient” and “good child” terms through interviews with 40 adolescent oncology patients. The adolescents' description of the concepts plus the behaviors of parents and professionals is reported. The study reports on parental actions and clinician behaviors perceived by adolescents with cancer as supportive in helping them to achieve their good child and good patient definitions.

    4. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Blinatumomab treatment of older adults with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Results from two phase 2 studies

      Hagop M. Kantarjian, Anthony S. Stein, Ralf C. Bargou, Carlos Grande Garcia, Richard A. Larson, Matthias Stelljes, Nicola Gökbuget, Gerhard Zugmaier, Jonathan E. Benjamin, Alicia Zhang, Catherine Jia and Max S. Topp

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30031

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      Older adults with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia typically have a worse prognosis and fewer therapy options compared with younger patients. In this analysis of pooled data from two phase 2 studies of single-agent blinatumomab therapy in patients with this disease, older (aged ≥65 years) and younger (aged <65 years) adults had similar treatment outcomes.

    5. Gastrointestinal Disease
      Treatment allocation in patients with early-stage esophageal adenocarcinoma: Prevalence and predictors of lymph node involvement

      Anthony M. Gamboa, Sungjin Kim, Seth D. Force, Charles A. Staley, Kevin E. Woods, David A. Kooby, Shishir K. Maithel, Jennifer A. Luke, Katherine M. Shaffer, Sunil Dacha, Nabil F. Saba, Steven A. Keilin, Qiang Cai, Bassel F. El-Rayes, Zhengjia Chen and Field F. Willingham

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30040

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      In a large national sample of patients with early, low-grade esophageal cancers, the prevalence of lymph node metastasis is low. For selected patients, these data support the use of local endoscopic surgical resection as an alternative to surgical management.

    6. Genitourinary Disease
      Prostate tumor DNA methylation is associated with cigarette smoking and adverse prostate cancer outcomes

      Irene M. Shui, Chao-Jen Wong, Shanshan Zhao, Suzanne Kolb, Ericka M. Ebot, Milan S. Geybels, Rohina Rubicz, Jonathan L. Wright, Daniel W. Lin, Brandy Klotzle, Marina Bibikova, Jian-Bing Fan, Elaine A. Ostrander, Ziding Feng and Janet L. Stanford

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30045

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      This unique analysis integrates smoking status, tumor DNA methylation, tumor gene expression, and long-term follow-up for prostate cancer outcomes. The results support the hypothesis that smoking-associated tumor DNA methylation changes may explain at least part of the association between smoking and adverse prostate cancer outcomes.

  3. Correspondence

  4. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in infectious complications during induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia

      Jessica R. Galloway-Peña, Daniel P. Smith, Pranoti Sahasrabhojane, Nadim J. Ajami, W. Duncan Wadsworth, Naval G. Daver, Roy F. Chemaly, Lisa Marsh, Shashank S. Ghantoji, Naveen Pemmaraju, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Katayoun Rezvani, Amin M. Alousi, Jennifer A. Wargo, Elizabeth J. Shpall, Phillip A. Futreal, Michele Guindani, Joseph F. Petrosino, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis and Samuel A. Shelburne

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30039

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      Correlations between microbiome composition and infectious outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy were investigated. The results indicate that longitudinal analyses and measurements of oral and stool microbiomes in patients with AML can assist with risk assessment or mitigation of infectious complications during AML therapy.

    2. Discipline

      Survivorship
      A randomized trial of videoconference-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for survivors of breast cancer with self-reported cognitive dysfunction

      Robert J. Ferguson, Sandra T. Sigmon, Andrew J. Pritchard, Sharon L. LaBrie, Rachel E. Goetze, Christine M. Fink and A. Merrill Garrett

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29891

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      A randomized controlled trial comparing brief cognitive behavioral therapy (Memory and Attention Adaptation Training [MAAT]) with an attention control condition (supportive therapy [ST]) was conducted among survivors of breast cancer who reported cognitive dysfunction after chemotherapy. Both MAAT and ST were delivered over a videoconference device. MAAT participants made significant improvements in self-reported cognitive impairments and neuropsychological processing speed compared with controls. MAAT may be an effective videoconference cognitive behavioral therapy for cognitive dysfunction among survivors of breast cancer.

    3. Disparities Research
      Racial and ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus-associated cancer burden with first-generation and second-generation human papillomavirus vaccines

      Emily A. Burger, Kyueun Lee, Mona Saraiya, Trevor D. Thompson, Harrell W. Chesson, Lauri E. Markowitz and Jane J. Kim

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30007

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      Human papillomavirus vaccines are expected to reduce the overall burden of human papillomavirus-associated cancers for all racial/ethnic groups as well as reduce the absolute disparity gap. However, even with improved coverage with the second-generation vaccine, relative racial/ethnic disparities will likely still exist and may widen if the underlying causes of these disparities remain unaddressed.

    4. Disease Site

      Head and Neck Disease
      Confirmation of proposed human papillomavirus risk–adapted staging according to AJCC/UICC TNM criteria for positive oropharyngeal carcinomas

      Zachary D. Horne, Scott M. Glaser, John A. Vargo, Robert L. Ferris, Goundappa K. Balasubramani, David A. Clump, Dwight E. Heron and Sushil Beriwal

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30021

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      The current American Joint Commission on Cancer staging system for human papillomavirus–positive oropharyngeal cancers does not accurately reflect disease outcomes. This large, registry-based, retrospective study validates a recently proposed human papillomavirus risk–adapted restaging structure for more accurately risk-stratifying patients on the basis of their observed outcomes.

  5. Correspondence

  6. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Psychosocial Oncology
      The relationship between coping strategies, quality of life, and mood in patients with incurable cancer

      Ryan D. Nipp, Areej El-Jawahri, Joel N. Fishbein, Justin Eusebio, Jamie M. Stagl, Emily R. Gallagher, Elyse R. Park, Vicki A. Jackson, William F. Pirl, Joseph A. Greer and Jennifer S. Temel

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30025

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      Patients with a new diagnosis of incurable cancer cope in a variety of unique ways. Patients' use of certain coping strategies correlate with their quality of life and mood, and this suggests that evaluating and addressing patients' coping behaviors may affect other key patient-reported outcomes.

    2. Epidemiology
      Glioblastoma in the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland revisited: 2005 to 2009

      Dorothee Gramatzki, Silvia Dehler, Elisabeth Jane Rushing, Kathrin Zaugg, Silvia Hofer, Yasuhiro Yonekawa, Helmut Bertalanffy, Anton Valavanis, Dimitri Korol, Sabine Rohrmann, Miklos Pless, Joachim Oberle, Patrick Roth, Hiroko Ohgaki and Michael Weller

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30023

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      Population-based studies of glioblastoma are scarce and traditionally have suffered from methodological limitations. In the current study, the authors demonstrate that, on a population level, the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma diagnosed in the Canton of Zurich in Switzerland has markedly improved from the pre-temozolomide to the temozolomide era. Age, Karnofsky performance score, extent of tumor resection, first-line treatment regimens, and, as demonstrated for the first time, MGMT promoter methylation status as well as isocitrate dehydrogenase 1R132H mutation status are associated with survival today.

    3. Outcomes Research
      Comparative effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery versus whole-brain radiation therapy for patients with brain metastases from breast or non–small cell lung cancer

      Lia M. Halasz, Hajime Uno, Melissa Hughes, Thomas D'Amico, Elisabeth U. Dexter, Stephen B. Edge, James A. Hayman, Joyce C. Niland, Gregory A. Otterson, Katherine M. W. Pisters, Richard Theriault, Jane C. Weeks and Rinaa S. Punglia

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30009

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      With data from a multi-institutional, longitudinal database, propensity score analyses have been performed for patients treated for brain metastases from non–small cell lung cancer or breast cancer. Patients treated initially for fewer than 4 brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery alone have improved survival.

    4. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Changes in treatment patterns for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in the United States over the past decade: An analysis from the National Cancer Data Base

      Helmneh M. Sineshaw, Ahmedin Jemal, Charles R. Thomas Jr and Timur Mitin

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29993

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      Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base revealed that over the past decade, the adoption of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been increasing in the United States for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Unfortunately, only approximately one-half of US patients currently receive the standard care with trimodality therapy, which is in part related to socioeconomic factors.

    5. Discipline

      Psychosocial Oncology
      Institutional capacity to provide psychosocial oncology support services: A report from the Association of Oncology Social Work

      Brad Zebrack, Karen Kayser, Lynne Padgett, Laura Sundstrom, Chad Jobin, Krista Nelson and Iris C. Fineberg

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30016

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      The results of this study suggest that cancer programs in the United States are performing moderately well in terms of the provision of psychosocial care. Variations in psychosocial service capacity appear to be a function of patient, provider, and system characteristics. See also pages 000-000.

    6. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      The role of sexuality symptoms in myeloproliferative neoplasm symptom burden and quality of life: An analysis by the MPN QOL International Study Group

      Holly L. Geyer, Bjorn Andreasson, Heidi E. Kosiorek, Amylou C. Dueck, Robyn M. Scherber, Kari A. Martin, Kristina A. Butler, Claire N. Harrison, Deepti H. Radia, Francisco Cervantes, Jean-Jacques Kiladjian, Andreas Reiter, Gunnar Birgegard, Francesco Passamonti, Zhenya Senyak, Alessandro M. Vannucchi, Chiara Paoli, Zhijian Xiao, Jan Samuelsson and Ruben A. Mesa

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30013

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      Sexuality problems impact all domains of functionality, depression, microvascular symptoms, and overall quality of life among patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. These problems correlate with patient age, the presence of cytopenias, transfusion requirements, and common therapies for myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  7. Editorial

    1. Let's talk about sex[uality]-related symptom burden in myeloproliferative neoplasms

      Aaron T. Gerds

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30017

      A thoughtful conversation about sexual symptom burden should occur as part of a comprehensive assessment of the overall well-being of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. In the article by Geyer et al in this issue of Cancer, the authors quantify the sexuality-related symptoms, along with quality of life, in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, and evaluate how they correspond to disease features and treatment.

    2. Quality of psychosocial services in cancer centers: Today and tomorrow

      William F. Pirl and Inga T. Lennes

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30018

      Data from Zebrack et al's survey of 57 cancer centers in the United States and Canada have led the authors to conclude that cancers centers are performing moderately well in communicating the importance of psychosocial care, identifying patient psychosocial needs, and referring patients to services. This editorial focuses on areas that need further work and places the data in the context of the process of changing practice to improve the quality of care.See also pages 000-000.

  8. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Nonrandomized comparison of neurofibromatosis type 1 and non–neurofibromatosis type 1 children who received carboplatin and vincristine for progressive low-grade glioma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group

      Joann L. Ater, Caihong Xia, Claire M. Mazewski, Timothy N. Booth, David R. Freyer, Roger J. Packer, Richard Sposto, Gilbert Vezina and Ian F. Pollack

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29987

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      Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 who are treated for low-grade gliomas tolerate carboplatin and vincristine well and have tumor response rates and event-free survival superior to those for children without neurofibromatosis type 1.

    2. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Nonbleeding adenomas: Evidence of systematic false-negative fecal immunochemical test results and their implications for screening effectiveness–A modeling study

      Miriam P. van der Meulen, Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Else-Mariëtte B. van Heijningen, Ernst J. Kuipers and Marjolein van Ballegooijen

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29952

      A percentage of adenomas are systematically missed by repeated fecal immunochemical test screening. This impairs the efficacy of fecal immunochemical test screening, although the effect appears to be limited.

    3. Breast Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Updated results of the Gothenburg Trial of Mammographic Screening

      Nils G. Bjurstam, Lena M. Björneld and Stephen W. Duffy

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29975

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      In a randomized trial of breast cancer screening, a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality is found with the offer of mammographic screening. The results suggest that screening can be effective in women younger than 50 years.

    4. Gynecologic Oncology
      Olaparib maintenance therapy in patients with platinum-sensitive, relapsed serous ovarian cancer and a BRCA mutation: Overall survival adjusted for postprogression poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase inhibitor therapy

      Ursula A. Matulonis, Philipp Harter, Charlie Gourley, Michael Friedlander, Ignace Vergote, Gordon Rustin, Clare Scott, Werner Meier, Ronnie Shapira-Frommer, Tamar Safra, Daniela Matei, Anitra Fielding, Stuart Spencer, David Parry, Lynda Grinsted and Jonathan A. Ledermann

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29995

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      Maintenance therapy with olaparib, a poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase inhibitor, in patients with platinum-sensitive, relapsed serous ovarian cancer and a BRCA mutation significantly improves progression-free survival in comparison with a placebo, according to an interim analysis. However, BRCA mutation carriers receiving a placebo who switch to a poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase inhibitor after disease progression are suggested by a post hoc analysis to have a confounding influence on the interim overall survival analysis.

    5. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Risk of brain metastases in patients with nonmetastatic lung cancer: Analysis of the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data

      Priscila H. Goncalves, Stephanie L. Peterson, Fawn D. Vigneau, Ronald D. Shore, William O. Quarshie, Khairul Islam, Ann G. Schwartz, Antoinette J. Wozniak and Shirish M. Gadgeel

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30000

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      Brain metastases remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with lung cancer The results of the current study demonstrate that the incidence of brain metastases in patients with nonmetastatic lung cancer varies according to histology, age, and sex in data obtained from a diagnosis period spanning 39 years.

    6. Disease Site

      Hepatobiliary Disease
      Phase 2 study of stereotactic body radiotherapy and optional transarterial chemoembolization for solitary hepatocellular carcinoma not amenable to resection and radiofrequency ablation

      Atsuya Takeda, Naoko Sanuki, Yuichiro Tsurugai, Shogo Iwabuchi, Kotaro Matsunaga, Hirotoshi Ebinuma, Kento Imajo, Yousuke Aoki, Hidetsugu Saito and Etsuo Kunieda

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30008

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      Stereotactic body radiotherapy achieves high local control (3-year local control rate, 96.3%) and overall survival with acceptable toxicities for patients who have a solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), despite rather stringent conditions. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can be effective against solitary HCC in treatment-naive, intrahepatic failure, residual disease, and recurrent settings, taking advantage of its distinctive characteristics.

    7. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Accuracy of advanced cancer patients' life expectancy estimates: The role of race and source of life expectancy information

      Kelly M. Trevino, Baohui Zhang, Megan J. Shen and Holly G. Prigerson

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.30001

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      The majority of advanced cancer patients have an inaccurate understanding of their life expectancy and do not rely on medical providers for information on life expectancy. Black patients are less likely than white patients to have an accurate understanding of their life expectancy and to rely on their medical providers for information on life expectancy.

    8. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces toxicity with similar biochemical control compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A randomized clinical trial

      Gustavo Arruda Viani, Bruno Silveira Viana, Jose Eduardo Chicareli Martin, Bruno Tiago Rossi, Gisele Zuliani and Eduardo Jose Stefano

      Article first published online: 29 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29983

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      This randomized clinical trial is the first head-to-head comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in 215 patients with prostate cancer who received treatment on a hypofractionated schedule. The results reveal a significant reduction in grade ≥2 acute/late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity, a significant improvement in quality-of-life domains in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy arm, and similar biochemical control.

    9. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      A phase 2 clinical trial of everolimus plus bicalutamide for castration-resistant prostate cancer

      Helen Chow, Paramita M. Ghosh, Ralph deVere White, Christopher P. Evans, Marc A. Dall'Era, Stanley A. Yap, Yueju Li, Laurel A. Beckett, Primo N. Lara Jr and Chong-Xian Pan

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29927

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      The combination of bicalutamide and everolimus achieved a prostate-specific antigen response rate of 75% (95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.90) compared with the historical control of 25% with bicalutamide alone in 24 bicalutamide-naïve patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    10. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome in the province of Ontario

      Marina Wang, Saud Aldubayan, Ashton A. Connor, Beatrix Wong, Kate Mcnamara, Tahsin Khan, Kara Semotiuk, Sam Khalouei, Spring Holter, Melyssa Aronson, Zane Cohen, Steve Gallinger, George Charames, Aaron Pollett and Jordan Lerner-Ellis

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29950

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      The province of Ontario, Canada, sponsors a genetic testing program that is effective in identifying Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Through the testing of more unaffected family members, more cancers may be prevented.

    11. Head and Neck Disease
      Treatment trends and survival effects of chemotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base

      Phoebe Kuo, Julie A. Sosa, Barbara A. Burtness, Zain A. Husain, Saral Mehra, Sanziana A. Roman, Wendell G. Yarbrough and Benjamin L. Judson

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29962

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      In an analysis of patients with hypopharyngeal cancer in the National Cancer Data Base, there has been a significant increase in the use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy both as definitive treatment and in combination with surgery. On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was noted for chemoradiotherapy compared with radiation alone in the definitive setting.

    12. Discipline

      Clinical Trials
      Cognitive testing of tobacco use items for administration to patients with cancer and cancer survivors in clinical research

      Stephanie R. Land, Graham W. Warren, Jennifer L. Crafts, Dorothy K. Hatsukami, Jamie S. Ostroff, Gordon B. Willis, Veronica Y. Chollette, Sandra A. Mitchell, Jasmine N. M. Folz, James L. Gulley, Eva Szabo, Thomas H. Brandon, Sonia A. Duffy and Benjamin A. Toll

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29964

      Tobacco use by patients with cancer is an understudied area, and research and clinical management have been impeded by a lack of standardized self-report measures for assessment. The current study reports the development and cognitive interviewing study of the newly designed Cancer Patient Tobacco Use Questionnaire (C-TUQ), which is now available to assess tobacco use in patients during and after cancer treatment.

    13. Disease Site

      Head and Neck Disease
      Radiation therapy (with or without neck surgery) for phenotypic human papillomavirus–associated oropharyngeal cancer

      Adam S. Garden, Clifton D. Fuller, David I. Rosenthal, William N. William Jr, Gary B. Gunn, Beth M. Beadle, Faye M. Johnson, William H. Morrison, Jack Phan, Steven J. Frank, Merrill S. Kies and Erich M. Sturgis

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29965

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      According to a low-risk definition for patients with human papillomavirus–associated oropharyngeal cancers, the 2-year progression-free survival rate approximates 90%. When patients treated with radiation alone are evaluated, there is no compromise in this high rate of progression-free survival, which is higher than the 2-year progression-free survival thresholds used in current cooperative trials.

    14. Hematologic Malignancies
      Long-term follow-up of patients with acute myeloid leukemia surviving and free of disease recurrence for at least 2 years after autologous stem cell transplantation: A report from the acute leukemia working party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

      Tomasz Czerw, Myriam Labopin, Norbert-Claude Gorin, Sebastian Giebel, Didier Blaise, Giovanna Meloni, Arnaud Pigneux, Alberto Bosi, Joan Veelken, Felicetto Ferrara, Nicolaas Schaap, Roberto M. Lemoli, Jan J. Cornelissen, Eric Beohou, Arnon Nagler and Mohamad Mohty

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29990

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      Late disease recurrence remains a major concern for long-term survivors of autologous stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. This indicates the need for close monitoring of minimal residual disease and additional leukemic control measures after transplantation.

    15. Genitourinary Disease
      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Intratumoral heterogeneity: Role of differentiation in a potentially lethal phenotype of testicular cancer

      Shi-Ming Tu, Mehmet Asim Bilen, Kenneth R. Hess, Russell R. Broaddus, Scott Kopetz, Chongjuan Wei, Lance C. Pagliaro, Jose A. Karam, John F. Ward, Christopher G. Wood, Priya Rao, Zachary H. Tu, Rosale General, Adrienne H. Chen, Yago L. Nieto, Sai-ching J. Yeung, Sue-Hwa Lin, Christopher J. Logothetis and Louis L. Pisters

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29996

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      Whether intratumoral heterogeneity is derived from differentiation of aberrant progenitor cells or from mutation of driver genes is investigated in a relevant clinical model, and the results suggest that intratumoral heterogeneity is caused in part by differentiation of pluripotent progenitor cells. Integrated or multimodal therapy may be effective at addressing intratumoral heterogeneity and treating distinct tumor subtypes as well as potentially lethal tumor phenotypes; this finding has profound clinical implications regarding the origin of intratumoral heterogeneity and the implementation of precision medicine in testicular cancer and other solid tumors.

    16. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Early impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on insurance among young adults with cancer: Analysis of the dependent insurance provision

      Helen M. Parsons, Susanne Schmidt, Laura L. Tenner, Heejung Bang and Theresa H.M. Keegan

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29982

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      In the current study, the authors examine the early impact of the dependent insurance provisions from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on insurance rates in young adults with cancer. They report a 3.1% increase in insurance rates for young adults aged 18 to 25 years compared with those aged 26 to 29 years that do not appear to be due to increases in Medicaid enrollment, thereby demonstrating a positive impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act dependent care provisions on insurance rates in this population.

    17. Disease Site

      Neuro-Oncology
      Contrast-enhancing tumor growth dynamics of preoperative, treatment-naive human glioblastoma

      Benjamin M. Ellingson, Huytram N. Nguyen, Albert Lai, Ruben E. Nechifor, Okkar Zaw, Whitney B. Pope, William H. Yong, Phioanh L. Nghiemphu, Linda M. Liau and Timothy F. Cloughesy

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29957

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      The growth dynamics of contrast-enhancing tumors are explored in 95 patients with glioblastoma who had measurable disease at>2 or more time points before undergoing initial surgical resection. The results suggest that follow-up between magnetic resonance imaging examinations in glioblastoma should be >28 days to reliably detect tumor growth and progressive disease and that small initial tumor sizes are inherently biased toward large percentage changes in tumor volume at follow-up.

    18. Gastrointestinal Disease
      Whole-exome sequencing of duodenal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mutations

      Wei Yuan, Zhou Zhang, Binghua Dai, Qing Wei, Jinjin Liu, Yuzhen Liu, Yun Liu, Lin He and Daizhan Zhou

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29974

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      To the authors' knowledge, there have been very few well-established genomic characterizations of duodenal adenocarcinoma due its rarity. The identification of base substitutions and recurrently mutated genes and pathways suggest that duodenal adenocarcinoma is genetically akin to gastric and colorectal cancers, and the variation in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a critical event in duodenal tumorigenesis.

    19. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Population attributable fractions of risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States

      Oxana V. Makarova-Rusher, Sean F. Altekruse, Tim S. McNeel, Susanna Ulahannan, Austin G. Duffy, Barry I. Graubard, Tim F. Greten and Katherine A. McGlynn

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29971

      Although major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma are known, the contribution of each to the hepatocellular carcinoma burden in the United States is not well understood. This analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicate data indicates that, between 2000 and 2011, the attributable risk of metabolic disorders was consistently higher than that of any other factor, including hepatitis C virus infection, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and hepatitis B virus infection.

    20. Disease Site

      Hematologic Malignancies
      Activity of the oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor trametinib in RAS-mutant relapsed or refractory myeloid malignancies

      Gautam Borthakur, Leslie Popplewell, Michael Boyiadzis, James Foran, Uwe Platzbecker, Norbert Vey, Roland B. Walter, Rebecca Olin, Azra Raza, Aristoteles Giagounidis, Aref Al-Kali, Elias Jabbour, Tapan Kadia, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, John W. Bauman, Yuehui Wu, Yuan Liu, Dan Schramek, Donna S. Cox, Paul Wissel and Hagop Kantarjian

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29986

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      This is the first study to show a link between RAS-mutant myeloid malignancies and clinical responses to mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor therapy. These data highlight the importance of the RAS/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in leukemogenesis and support further study of trametinib in patients with RAS-mutant myeloid malignancies.

  9. Review Articles

    1. Caring for caregivers and patients: Research and clinical priorities for informal cancer caregiving

      Erin E. Kent, Julia H. Rowland, Laurel Northouse, Kristin Litzelman, Wen-Ying Sylvia Chou, Nonniekaye Shelburne, Catherine Timura, Ann O'Mara and Karen Huss

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29939

      This article reviews current evidence on the state of the science of informal cancer caregiving. Recommendations include improving the prevalence and burden estimation of informal cancer caregiving; advancing the development of interventions designed to improve outcomes for cancer patients, caregivers, and patient-caregiver dyads; generating strategies to integrate caregivers into formal health care settings; and promoting the use of technology to support informal cancer caregivers.

  10. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Impact of end-of-life discussions on the reduction of Latino/non-Latino disparities in do-not-resuscitate order completion

      Megan Johnson Shen, Holly G. Prigerson, Elizabeth Paulk, Kelly M. Trevino, Frank J. Penedo, Ana I. Tergas, Andrew S. Epstein, Alfred I. Neugut and Paul K. Maciejewski

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29973

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      Clinical discussions regarding end-of-life (EOL) care dramatically increase the likelihood of do-not-resuscitate order completion for Latino patients with advanced cancers. Efforts to enhance communication regarding EOL care for Latino patients are likely to reduce Latino/non-Latino disparities in advance care planning and EOL care.

    2. Disease Site

      Neuro-Oncology
      Thrombocytopenia and craniotomy for tumor: A National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis

      Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Christopher A. Devine, Kevin X. Liu, William B. Gormley, Elizabeth B. Claus, Timothy R. Smith and Ian F. Dunn

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29984

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      In this American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis, 14,852 patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor were analyzed to evaluate the impact of preoperative platelet count on perioperative outcomes. Thrombocytopenia appears to be associated with an increased hazard of 30-day death and odds of unplanned reoperation.

    3. Head and Neck Disease
      Using the galactose-α-1,3-galactose enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to predict anaphylaxis in response to cetuximab

      Jared Weiss, Juneko Grilley Olson, Allison Mary Deal, Bhishamjit Chera, Mark Weissler, Barbara A. Murphy, David Neil Hayes and Jill Gilbert

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29978

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      Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody with activity against head and neck cancer and colorectal cancer and has a 14% anaphylaxis rate in the Southeastern United States. In this phase 2 study of a cetuximab-containing regimen, the negative predictive value of the galactose-α-1,3-galactose enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for anaphylaxis is 100%.

  11. Review Articles

    1. Uveal melanoma: From diagnosis to treatment and the science in between

      Chandrani Chattopadhyay, Dae Won Kim, Dan S. Gombos, Junna Oba, Yong Qin, Michelle D. Williams, Bita Esmaeli, Elizabeth A. Grimm, Jennifer A. Wargo, Scott E. Woodman and Sapna P. Patel

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29727

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      Patients with uveal melanoma often imprecisely receive the same treatment as patients with cutaneous melanoma. Because uveal melanoma is a unique subset of melanoma, its biology, immunology, and natural history demand closer investigation.

  12. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Genetic anticipation in BRCA1/BRCA2 families after controlling for ascertainment bias and cohort effect

      Rodrigo Santa Cruz Guindalini, Andrew Song, James D. Fackenthal, Olufunmilayo I. Olopade and Dezheng Huo

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29972

      After controlling for potential bias, the study found earlier disease onset in successive generation in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome but this observed anticipation effect was mainly driven by a decrease in age of onset across birth cohorts. This finding suggests that environmental/lifestyle factors rather than genetic changes account for the anticipation effect.

    2. Disparities Research
      Counties eliminating racial disparities in colorectal cancer mortality

      George Rust, Shun Zhang, Zhongyuan Yu, Lee Caplan, Sanjay Jain, Turgay Ayer, Luceta McRoy and Robert S. Levine

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29958

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      Counties sustaining equality over time and counties moving from disparities to equality of outcomes suggest that disparities are not inevitable. Local area variation in social determinants, health care workforce, and health systems all contribute to variations in cancer outcome disparity trend patterns.

    3. Supportive Care
      Personalized symptom goals and response in patients with advanced cancer

      David Hui, Minjeong Park, Omar Shamieh, Carlos Eduardo Paiva, Pedro Emilio Perez-Cruz, Mary Ann Muckaden and Eduardo Bruera

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29970

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      The personalized symptom goal is assessed by asking patients “At what level would you feel comfortable with this symptom?” and may allow clinicians to individualize therapeutic targets. In this prospective study, the authors characterize the personalized symptom goal for 10 common symptoms in patients with cancer, and identify the factors associated with personalized symptom response.

  13. Commentary

    1. Pathfinders in oncology from ancient times to the end of the Middle Ages

      Steven I. Hajdu

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29955

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      The biographies and historical background of 7 physicians who contributed the most to the progression of oncology from ancient times to the end of the Middle Ages are presented.

  14. Review Articles

    1. Solutions that enable ablative radiotherapy for large liver tumors: Fractionated dose painting, simultaneous integrated protection, motion management, and computed tomography image guidance

      Christopher H. Crane and Eugene J. Koay

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29878

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      Ablation of large liver tumors can be routinely achieved with radiation if high enough doses are used (biologic equivalent dose of 100 Gray). For tumors near bowel, this requires a solution for organ motion, high-quality soft tissue image guidance, and a stereotactic body radiation therapy technique with 15 to 25 rather than 5 fractions.

    2. Therapeutic radiation and the potential risk of second malignancies

      Sophia C. Kamran, Amy Berrington de Gonzalez, Andrea Ng, Daphne Haas-Kogan and Akila N. Viswanathan

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29841

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      Radiation appears to increase the risk of developing secondary neoplasms. This risk appears to be altered by multiple factors.

    3. Genetic alterations in salivary gland cancers

      Linda X. Yin and Patrick K. Ha

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29890

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      This review presents a broad understanding of the genetic landscapes that define various types of salivary gland cancers. The authors highlight the oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and cytogenetic and epigenetic changes associated with the most common tumor types.

    4. Understanding and effectively addressing breast cancer in African American women: Unpacking the social context

      David R. Williams, Selina A. Mohammed and Alexandra E. Shields

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29935

      Insufficient attention has been paid to how risk factors for breast cancer in African American women begin in childhood and are closely tied to the conditions in which they live and work. Future research needs to pay additional attention to how researchers, clinicians and the larger society can best understand and address the myriad factors linked to racial status that are associated with breast cancer risk among African American women.

    5. Irradiation and immunotherapy: From concept to the clinic

      April K. S. Salama, Michael A. Postow and Joseph K. Salama

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29889

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      Immunotherapies are transforming how many cancers are treated. The potential synergy between immunotherapy and radiation therapy are reviewed along with early clinical outcomes.

    6. Ototoxicity and cancer therapy

      Wendy Landier

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29779

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      Ototoxicity is a serious consequence associated with several agents commonly used in contemporary cancer therapy, including platinum-based chemotherapy, radiation and surgery involving the ear, and supportive care drugs including aminoglycoside antibiotics and loop diuretics. Progress has been made toward the early identification of ototoxicity, and rehabilitative strategies are available to help ameliorate the associated adverse social and educational consequences.

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