Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 122 Issue 4

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Fadlo R. Khuri, MD

Impact Factor: 5.068

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 32/211 (Oncology)

Online ISSN: 1097-0142

Associated Title(s): Cancer Cytopathology, CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians

VIEW

  1. 1 - 61
  1. Review Articles

    1. Reimagining care for adolescent and young adult cancer programs: Moving with the times

      Abha A. Gupta, Janet K. Papadakos, Jennifer M. Jones, Leila Amin, Eugene K. Chang, Chana Korenblum, Daniel Santa Mina, Lianne McCabe, Laura Mitchell and Meredith E. Giuliani

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29834

      • image

      Adult cancer centers may have resources that can be leveraged into programs for adolescent and young adult cancer care to optimize care delivery. Additional domains worthy of consideration for adolescent and young adult cancer programs include fatigue, exercise, sexual health, return to work, patient education, advanced cancers, and survivorship.

  2. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Incidence and incidence trends of the most frequent cancers in adolescent and young adult Americans, including “nonmalignant/noninvasive” tumors

      Ronald D. Barr, Lynn A. G. Ries, Denise R. Lewis, Linda C. Harlan, Theresa H. M. Keegan, Brad H. Pollock, W. Archie Bleyer and for the US National Cancer Institute Science of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Epidemiology Working Group

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29867

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      In American adolescents and young adults (AYAs), 7 cancers have increased and 8 have decreased in incidence since 2000, with thyroid cancer accounting for most of the increase, likely because of overdiagnosis, whereas incidence reductions may reflect the impact of successful programs of prevention. A higher proportion of noninvasive tumors in AYAs than in children and older adults prompts a need to revise the current system of classifying tumors in this population.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Social well-being among adolescents and young adults with cancer: A systematic review

      Echo L. Warner, Erin E. Kent, Kelly M. Trevino, Helen M. Parsons, Brad J. Zebrack and Anne C. Kirchhoff

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29866

      • image

      A cancer diagnosis during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to considerable problems with regard to social well-being. The current study systematically reviews the literature concerning the social well-being of adolescents and young adults with cancer and finds consistent difficulties related to employment/educational attainment, financial stability, social relationships, and supportive care.

  4. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Epidemiology
      Comparison of cancer survival trends in the United States of adolescents and young adults with those in children and older adults

      Theresa H.M. Keegan, Lynn A.G. Ries, Ronald D. Barr, Ann M. Geiger, Deborah Vollmer Dahlke, Bradley H. Pollock, Archie Bleyer and for the National Cancer Institute Next Steps for Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Epidemiology Working Group

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29869

      • image

      In the United States, survival improved for 14 types of cancers among adolescents and young adults since 1992. However, survival is not improving to the same extent in adolescents and young adults as in children or older adults for a number of cancers.

  5. Review Articles

    1. Biologic and clinical characteristics of adolescent and young adult cancers: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, and sarcoma

      James V. Tricoli, Donald G. Blair, Carey K. Anders, Archie Bleyer, Lisa A. Boardman, Javed Khan, Shivaani Kummar, Brandon Hayes-Lattin, Stephen P. Hunger, Melinda Merchant, Nita L. Seibel, Magdalena Thurin and Cheryl L. Willman

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29871

      • image
      • image
      • image

      There is a need for basic biologic, genomic, and model development for cancers in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) as well as translational research studies to elucidate any fundamental differences between pediatric, AYA, and adult cancers. If these differences can be elucidated, then the information can be used to start the development of novel therapies for treating AYA cancers and companion diagnostics to accompany these treatments.

    2. Next steps for adolescent and young adult oncology workshop: An update on progress and recommendations for the future

      Ashley Wilder Smith, Nita L. Seibel, Denise R. Lewis, Karen H. Albritton, Donald F. Blair, Charles D. Blanke, Archie Bleyer, David R. Freyer, Ann M. Geiger, Brandon Hayes-Lattin, James V. Tricoli, Lynne I. Wagner and Bradley J. Zebrack

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29870

      This report provides an overview of the National Cancer Institute and LIVESTRONG Foundation workshop on adolescent and young adult cancer research. Current science, including epidemiology, basic biology, clinical trials, health services, and health-related quality-of-life research, is reviewed with recommendations for future research priorities.

  6. Correspondence

  7. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Satisfaction with cancer care among underserved racial-ethnic minorities and lower-income patients receiving patient navigation

      Pascal Jean-Pierre, Ying Cheng, Kristen J. Wells, Karen M. Freund, Frederick R. Snyder, Kevin Fiscella, Alan E. Holden, Electra D. Paskett, Donald J. Dudley, Melissa A. Simon, Patricia A. Valverde and Patient Navigation Research Program

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29902

      Patients with greater satisfaction with their patient navigators appear to have greater satisfaction with cancer care, when controlling for sociodemographic and clinical variables. This information can be used to improve patient navigation programs to reduce cancer disparities and mortality for underserved racial-ethnic minorities and the poor in the United States.

    2. Outcomes Research
      Management of localized and advanced prostate cancer in Canada: A lifetime cost and quality-adjusted life-year analysis

      Chiranjeev Sanyal, Armen G. Aprikian, Fabio L. Cury, Simone Chevalier and Alice Dragomir

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29892

      • image
      • image
      • image

      In the current study, lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years appear to be influenced by the level of risk at the time of diagnosis and the initial management option. The value of contemporary management strategies is highlighted by comparative costs and quality-adjusted life-years.

    3. Clinical Trials
      Bevacizumab beyond disease progression after first-line treatment with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (West Japan Oncology Group 5910L): An open-label, randomized, phase 2 trial

      Masayuki Takeda, Takeharu Yamanaka, Takashi Seto, Hidetoshi Hayashi, Koichi Azuma, Morihito Okada, Shunichi Sugawara, Haruko Daga, Tomonori Hirashima, Kimio Yonesaka, Yoshiko Urata, Haruyasu Murakami, Haruhiro Saito, Akihito Kubo, Toshiyuki Sawa, Eiji Miyahara, Naoyuki Nogami, Kazuhiko Nakagawa, Yoichi Nakanishi and Isamu Okamoto

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29893

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      There has been no evidence to support the use of bevacizumab beyond disease progression in patients with advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer whose disease has progressed after first-line treatment with bevacizumab plus a platinum-based doublet. A randomized trial has now shown that the continuation of bevacizumab therapy beyond disease progression in such patients meets the predefined threshold of P < .2 for the primary endpoint of progression-free survival. See also pages 000-000.

  8. Review Articles

    1. A systematic review of the cost and cost-effectiveness studies of proton radiotherapy

      Vivek Verma, Mark V. Mishra and Minesh P. Mehta

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29882

      • image

      In the face of economically changing landscapes of health care reform, having evidence-based justification of new technologies, such as proton radiation therapy, is crucial. The authors demonstrated that this modality is not the most cost-effective option for prostate or early-stage lung cancers; however, it is the most cost-effective for several pediatric cancers and remains favorable for some left-sided breast cancers, locoregionally advanced lung cancers, and select head/neck cancers.

  9. Editorial

    1. Bevacizumab beyond disease progression for advanced non–small cell lung cancer: Does persistence have its rewards?

      Irene Guijarro-Muñoz, Emily B. Roarty and John V. Heymach

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29894

      Persistence pays off when it comes to the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor bevacizumab in non–small cell lung cancer patients who have progressed on first-line chemotherapy. Continued vascular endothelial growth factor blockade after progression on first-line therapy may provide at least a modest benefit when it is continued with second-line chemotherapy. See also pages 000–000

  10. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Head and Neck Disease
      Patient-reported outcomes, body composition, and nutrition status in patients with head and neck cancer: Results from an exploratory randomized controlled exercise trial

      Lauren C. Capozzi, Margaret L. McNeely, Harold Y. Lau, Raylene A. Reimer, Janine Giese-Davis, Tak S. Fung and S. Nicole Culos-Reed

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29863

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      A physical activity lifestyle intervention for head and neck cancer patients during radiation treatment does not mitigate losses in body composition but may alleviate losses in fitness, QOL and nutrition status. Intervention adherence supports improved patient participation and ease of participation post radiation rather than during radiation therapy.

  11. Commentary

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Recommendations for a step-wise comparative approach to the evaluation of new screening tests for colorectal cancer

      Graeme P. Young, Carlo Senore, Jack S. Mandel, James E. Allison, Wendy S. Atkin, Robert Benamouzig, Patrick M. M. Bossuyt, Mahinda De Silva, Lydia Guittet, Stephen P. Halloran, Ulrike Haug, Geir Hoff, Steven H. Itzkowitz, Marcis Leja, Bernard Levin, Gerrit A. Meijer, Colm A. O'Morain, Susan Parry, Linda Rabeneck, Paul Rozen, Hiroshi Saito, Robert E. Schoen, Helen E. Seaman, Robert J. C. Steele, Joseph J. Y. Sung and Sidney J. Winawer

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29865

      • image

      To provide practical guidance on how to compare new screening tests with proven screening tests for colorectal cancer, a panel of experts reviews the literature and proposes a 4-phase evaluation process that includes comparison with existing, proven tests but does not necessarily require randomized controlled trials with mortality as the endpoint. New screening tests can be evaluated efficiently using this stepwise comparative approach.

  12. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Survivorship
      Risk factors for depression and fatigue among survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation

      Heather S.L. Jim, Steven K. Sutton, Paul B. Jacobsen, Paul J. Martin, Mary E. Flowers and Stephanie J. Lee

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29877

      • image

      The current study examined sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for depression and fatigue in a large cohort of survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation. Several risk factors were independently associated with depression and fatigue, including sex, age, current severity of chronic graft-versus-host disease, and current presence of chronic pain.

    2. Disease Site

      Gynecologic Oncology
      Preoperative experience for public hospital patients with gynecologic cancer: Do structural barriers widen the gap?

      Melissa K. Frey, Haley A. Moss, Fernanda Musa, Linda Rolnitzky, Gizelka David-West, Jing-Yi Chern, Leslie R. Boyd and John P. Curtin

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29859

      • image
      • image

      Health care disparities are present during the preoperative window for women with gynecologic cancer. Patients at a public hospital are subject to a greater number of preoperative visits and have to wait longer for surgery than patients at a private hospital.

    3. Discipline

      Quality of Life
      Quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity analysis of pazopanib versus sunitinib in patients with renal cell carcinoma

      Jennifer L. Beaumont, John M. Salsman, Jose Diaz, Keith C. Deen, Lauren McCann, Thomas Powles, Michelle D. Hackshaw, Robert J. Motzer and David Cella

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29888

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      A quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity (Q-TWiST) methodology is used for a post hoc analysis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma enrolled in a phase 3, randomized, open-label trial (COMPARZ) to evaluate the overall treatment effect differences between pazopanib and sunitinib. For most utility combinations of relapse and toxicity, patients treated with pazopanib exhibit a longer Q-TWiST than patients treated with sunitinib, and this is primarily due to the reduced length of time that pazopanib-treated patients spend with grade 3/4 toxicities.

    4. Outcomes Research
      Colorectal cancer outcomes and treatment patterns in patients too young for average-risk screening

      Zaid M. Abdelsattar, Sandra L. Wong, Scott E. Regenbogen, Diana M. Jomaa, Karin M. Hardiman and Samantha Hendren

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29716

      • image
      • image

      Patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed before age 50 years are more likely to present with advanced-stage disease. However, they receive more aggressive therapy and achieve longer disease-specific survival, suggesting some compensation for their later diagnosis.

  13. Review Articles

    1. Evaluation and management of intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

      Nestor F. Esnaola, Joshua E. Meyer, Andreas Karachristos, Jennifer L. Maranki, E. Ramsay Camp and Crystal S. Denlinger

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29692

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Cholangiocarcinomas are rare biliary tract tumors that are often challenging to diagnose and treat. This review focuses on recent advances in endoscopy, surgery, transplantation, radiotherapy, systemic therapy, and liver directed therapies in the curative or palliative treatment of patients with these tumors.

  14. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Pathology
      NTRK fusion oncogenes in pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma in northeast United States

      Manju L. Prasad, Monika Vyas, Matthew J. Horne, Renu K. Virk, Raffaella Morotti, Zongzhi Liu, Giovanni Tallini, Marina N. Nikiforova, Emily R. Christison-Lagay, Robert Udelsman, Catherine A. Dinauer and Yuri E. Nikiforov

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29887

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Pediatric papillary thyroid carcinomas with oncogene fusions (neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor types 1 and 3 [NTRK1/NTRK3], RET/PTC) are associated with extensive disease and aggressive pathology. An unusually high prevalence of NTRK1/NTRK3 oncogene fusion is observed in this pediatric population from the northeast United States.

    2. Supportive Care
      Anxiety, pain, and nausea during the treatment of standard-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A prospective, longitudinal study from the Children's Oncology Group

      L. Lee Dupuis, Xiaomin Lu, Hannah-Rose Mitchell, Lillian Sung, Meenakshi Devidas, Leonard A. Mattano Jr, William L. Carroll, Naomi Winick, Stephen P. Hunger, Kelly W. Maloney and Nina S. Kadan-Lottick

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29876

      • image
      • image

      Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia experience decreasing treatment-related anxiety, procedure-related anxiety, and pain over the first year of treatment. Nausea is worse 6 months after the diagnosis in comparison with 1 and 12 months after the diagnosis.

    3. Outcomes Research
      Cancer care cost trends in the United States: 1998 to 2012

      James A. Lee, Charles S. Roehrig and Erin Duggan Butto

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29883

      This research updates and expands on a prior analysis of cancer spending and indicates that prevalence and cancer care expenditure growth have slowed over time, whereas out-of-pocket cost sharing continues to decline.

  15. Review Articles

    1. Treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: A systematic review

      Roger Chou, Shelley S. Selph, David I. Buckley, Katie S. Gustafson, Jessica C. Griffin, Sara E. Grusing and John L. Gore

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29843

      • image

      Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin-based, multidrug regimens improves survival in patients with clinically localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer, and more extensive lymph node dissection during cystectomy appears to improve survival. Research is needed to determine the effectiveness of bladder-sparing therapies and to determine optimal chemotherapy regimens.

  16. Editorial

    1. Looking back to inform the future: Lesson learned from survivors of childhood cancer

      Saro H. Armenian and Smita Bhatia

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29703

      Long-term survival is an expected outcome for children diagnosed with retinoblastoma and low-grade astroglial tumors. Studies examining health-related outcomes in long-term survivors of these malignancies can help inform the next-generation therapeutic studies aimed at decreasing long-term morbidity without compromising survival.

  17. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Impaired mitochondrial function is abrogated by dexrazoxane in doxorubicin-treated childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors

      Steven E. Lipshultz, Lynn M. Anderson, Tracie L. Miller, Mariana Gerschenson, Kristen E. Stevenson, Donna S. Neuberg, Vivian I. Franco, Daniel E. LiButti, Lewis B. Silverman, Lynda M. Vrooman, Stephen E. Sallan and for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Consortium

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29872

      • image

      Impaired cardiac function in doxorubicin-treated childhood cancer survivors is partly mediated by the disruption of mitochondrial energy production. This study provides evidence supporting the idea that dexrazoxane adjuvant therapy in pediatric patients with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia offers systemic mitochondrial protection as observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells 7 years after treatment.

    2. Disease Site

      Neuro-Oncology
      Impact of vision loss among survivors of childhood central nervous system astroglial tumors

      Peter M. K. de Blank, Michael J. Fisher, Lu Lu, Wendy M. Leisenring, Kirsten K. Ness, Charles A. Sklar, Marilyn Stovall, Chris Vukadinovich, Leslie L. Robison, Gregory T. Armstrong and Kevin R. Krull

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29705

      • image
      • image

      The impact of impaired vision on psychological and socioeconomic outcomes among long-term survivors of childhood low-grade gliomas has not been investigated, but it could inform therapeutic decision making. Among survivors of childhood astroglial tumors (n = 1233), only adult survivors with bilateral blindness are more likely to live unmarried (adjusted odds ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-15.0), live with a caregiver (adjusted odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-7.5), and be unemployed (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5), whereas survivors with some remaining vision do not differ significantly from those without visual impairment.

    3. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Chronic medical conditions in adult survivors of retinoblastoma: Results of the Retinoblastoma Survivor Study

      Danielle Novetsky Friedman, Joanne F. Chou, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Ruth A. Kleinerman, Jennifer S. Ford, Charles A. Sklar, Yuelin Li, Mary S. McCabe, Leslie L. Robison, Brian P. Marr, David H. Abramson and Ira J. Dunkel

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29704

      • image

      Limited data are available regarding long-term morbidity in adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a survivor cohort that is not included in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Herein, the authors provide what to their knowledge is the first report of the risk of chronic conditions in adult survivors of retinoblastoma, focusing on nonocular, non-second malignancy-related outcomes. See pages 000-000 and 000-000.

    4. Diagnostic Imaging
      Prostate cancer detection with magnetic resonance-ultrasound fusion biopsy: The role of systematic and targeted biopsies

      Christopher P. Filson, Shyam Natarajan, Daniel J.A. Margolis, Jiaoti Huang, Patricia Lieu, Frederick J. Dorey, Robert E. Reiter and Leonard S. Marks

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29874

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Among men undergoing magnetic resonance-ultrasound fusion biopsy, combining systematic and targeted biopsy appears to be the most accurate for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Increasing prostate-specific antigen density and degree of suspicion of lesions noted on magnetic resonance imaging were most strongly associated with the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer.

    5. Quality of Life
      Health-related quality of life and health care use in cancer survivors compared with patients with chronic diseases

      Marianne J. Heins, Joke C. Korevaar, Petra E.P.C. Hopman, Gé A. Donker, François G. Schellevis and Mieke P.M. Rijken

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29853

      • image
      • image

      The physical health-related quality of life of cancer survivors is on average better than that of patients with chronic diseases. Cancer survivors pay fewer visits to a general practitioner or cardiologist, but do see a surgeon more often than patients with chronic diseases.

    6. Psychosocial Oncology
      Psychological morbidities in adolescent and young adult blood cancer patients during curative-intent therapy and early survivorship

      Lori S. Muffly, Fay J. Hlubocky, Niloufer Khan, Kristen Wroblewski, Katherine Breitenbach, Joseline Gomez, Jennifer L. McNeer, Wendy Stock and Christopher K. Daugherty

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29868

      • image
      • image

      More than one-third of adolescents and young adults with potentially curable blood cancers suffer from significant anxiety, depression, or posttraumatic stress during both curative-intent therapy and early survivorship. This suggests that this may be a time of heightened distress. The psychological burden of adolescents and young adults does not appear to be accurately identified by adolescent and young adult oncology providers, and this indicates a need for increased awareness in the hematology/oncology community.

    7. Disease Site

      Gastrointestinal Disease
      Efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for small bowel adenocarcinoma: A propensity score–matched analysis

      Brett L. Ecker, Matthew T. McMillan, Jashodeep Datta, Ronac Mamtani, Bruce J. Giantonio, Daniel T. Dempsey, Douglas L. Fraker, Jeffrey A. Drebin, Giorgos C. Karakousis and Robert E. Roses

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29840

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Small bowel adenocarcinoma is a rare gastrointestinal malignancy, and evidence-based guidelines for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection have previously been drawn from single-center, retrospective studies, which have not been sufficiently powered to detect a survival benefit. In a propensity score–matched analysis of patients with resected American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I to III small bowel adenocarcinoma identified in the National Cancer Data Base (a population-based registry), adjuvant chemotherapy demonstrates a significant survival advantage for AJCC stage III patients, regardless of the tumor location. Nonsignificant improvements in survival are observed for AJCC stage I and II patients, including a subset of patients with a T4 tumor classification or a positive resection margin.

    8. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      Radiation modality use and cardiopulmonary mortality risk in elderly patients with esophageal cancer

      Steven H. Lin, Ning Zhang, Joy Godby, Jingya Wang, Gary D. Marsh, Zhongxing Liao, Ritsuko Komaki, Linus Ho, Wayne L. Hofstetter, Stephen G. Swisher, Reza J. Mehran, Thomas A. Buchholz, Linda S. Elting and Sharon H. Giordano

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29857

      • image
      • image

      It is currently unclear whether the dosimetric advantages of organ sparing by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy translate into survival and cardiopulmonary mortality benefits in patients with esophageal cancer. This Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare and Texas Cancer Registry-Medicare population-based study found that although there were no differences noted with regard to cancer-specific or pulmonary-specific mortality, all-cause and cardiac-specific mortality rates were found to be significantly reduced in patients treated with IMRT on a propensity score-adjusted multivariate analysis.

    9. Epidemiology
      Baseline dietary glutamic acid intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: The Rotterdam study

      Gilson G. Viana Veloso, Oscar H. Franco, Rikje Ruiter, Catherina E. de Keyser, Albert Hofman, Bruno C. Stricker and Jessica C. Kiefte-de Jong

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29862

      Animal studies have previously shown that glutamine supplementation may decrease cancer development in the colon. This is the first human study showing that the intake of glutamic acid, a precursor of glutamine, is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.

  18. Review Articles

    1. The evolution and clinical relevance of prognostic classification systems in myelofibrosis

      Prithviraj Bose and Srdan Verstovsek

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29842

      This article traces the evolution of prognostic criteria and scoring systems for myelofibrosis, both primary and post-polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia types, from early complete blood count-based systems to the current genomic era. Prognostic factors for not only survival but also thrombosis and leukemic transformation are discussed, and the clinical usefulness and drawbacks/pitfalls of the current and proposed systems are examined.

    2. You have free access to this content
      The evolution of arsenic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms: Moving toward an effective oral, outpatient therapy

      Lorenzo Falchi, Srdan Verstovsek, Farhad Ravandi-Kashani and Hagop M. Kantarjian

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29852

      Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is part of the standard of care for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Oral formulations of ATO have been developed recently and are entering clinical practice. The authors discuss the evolution of arsenic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms.

  19. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Hepatobiliary Disease
      Direct costs of care for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis

      Elliot B. Tapper, Andreea M. Catana, Nidhi Sethi, Daniel Mansuri, Saurabh Sethi, Annie Vong and Nezam H. Afdhal

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29855

      • image
      • image
      • image

      The economics of hepatitis C therapy needs real-world estimates of the cost of hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. This study of 100 randomly selected patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis demonstrates a median cost of $176,456 per patient ($6279 per patient-month).

  20. Erratum

    1. You have free access to this content
  21. Editorial

    1. You have free access to this content
      Pricey pills for an even pricier problem

      Sharon W. Kwan

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29854

      With more than 3 million people in the United States infected with hepatitis C, the price of treating all prevalent cases could potentially top $200 billion. Tapper et al provide support for the idea that appropriate hepatocellular carcinoma cost inputs have been used in recent cost-effectiveness analyses of direct-acting antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C infection.

  22. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma
      SARC009: Phase 2 study of dasatinib in patients with previously treated, high-grade, advanced sarcoma

      Scott M. Schuetze, J. Kyle Wathen, David R. Lucas, Edwin Choy, Brian L. Samuels, Arthur P. Staddon, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Margaret von Mehren, Warren A. Chow, David M. Loeb, Hussein A. Tawbi, Daniel A. Rushing, Shreyaskumar R. Patel, Dafydd G. Thomas, Rashmi Chugh, Denise K. Reinke and Laurence H. Baker

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29858

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases, was evaluated for anticancer activity in distinct histologic subtypes of sarcoma. Use of an adaptive Bayesian design allowed for the efficient estimation of clinical benefit from dasatinib and limited enrollment in subtypes in which no activity was observed.

    2. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Identification of patient subgroups with markedly disparate rates of MYCN amplification in neuroblastoma: A report from the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group project

      Daria Thompson, Kieuhoa T. Vo, Wendy B. London, Matthias Fischer, Peter F. Ambros, Akira Nakagawara, Garrett M. Brodeur, Katherine K. Matthay and Steven G. DuBois

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29848

      • image
      • image

      MYCN amplification in neuroblastoma is strongly associated with biology/pathology variables and particularly segmental chromosomal aberrations. Recursive partitioning techniques using these variables alone or in conjunction with clinical variables can identify subgroups of patients with markedly disparate rates of MYCN amplification.

    3. Clinical Trials
      Oncolytic reovirus in combination with chemotherapy in metastatic or recurrent non–small cell lung cancer patients with KRAS-activated tumors

      Miguel A. Villalona-Calero, Elaine Lam, Gregory A. Otterson, Weiqiang Zhao, Matthew Timmons, Deepa Subramaniam, Erinn M. Hade, George M. Gill, Matthew Coffey, Giovanni Selvaggi, Erin Bertino, Bo Chao and Michael V. Knopp

      Article first published online: 28 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29856

      • image
      • image
      • image

      The naturally occurring oncolytic reovirus Reolysin, which preferentially targets Kras-activated cancer cells, is reasonably well tolerated in combination with chemotherapy in lung cancer patients with activated Kras. The clinical outcomes observed are encouraging in this patient population, and a subsequent randomized trial is planned.

    4. Phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant bevacizumab plus pemetrexed and carboplatin in patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma (GASTO 1001)

      Wei Ou, Ning Li, Si-Yu Wang, Jian Li, Qian-Wen Liu, Qun-Ai Huang and Bao-Xiao Wang

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29800

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      In this phase 2 trial, the authors investigate induction bevacizumab plus pemetrexed and carboplatin followed by surgery for patients with unresectable stage III lung adenocarcinoma. The results suggest that induction bevacizumab plus chemotherapy followed by surgery is feasible and safe in these patients. See also pages 000-000.

  23. Commentary

    1. Neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non–small cell lung cancer

      Paul A. Bunn Jr, Laurie E. Gaspar, Michael J. Weyant and John D. Mitchell

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29797

      Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy can be considered for patients with potentially resectable stage III Non–Small cell lung cancer. The use of antiangiogenic agents, the best systemic therapy, and the best radiation field and dose require further study.

  24. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Pediatric Oncology
      Acute respiratory infections in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

      Hana Hakim, Ronald Dallas, Yinmei Zhou, Dequing Pei, Cheng Cheng, Patricia M. Flynn, Ching-Hon Pui and Sima Jeha

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29833

      • image
      • image

      The current study describes the incidence, clinical course, and impact of respiratory viral infections in a retrospective cohort of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factors for and outcome of progression to lower respiratory tract infections were identified.

  25. Correspondence

  26. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Medical Oncology
      Role of race in oncogenic driver prevalence and outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma: Results from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium

      Conor E. Steuer, Madhusmita Behera, Lynne Berry, Sungjin Kim, Michael Rossi, Gabriel Sica, Taofeek K. Owonikoko, Bruce E. Johnson, Mark G. Kris, Paul A. Bunn, Fadlo R. Khuri, Edward B. Garon and Suresh S. Ramalingam

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29812

      • image
      • image

      The discovery of oncogenic drivers has ushered in a new era for lung cancer and other cancers, but the prevalence and impact of these mutations in lung adenocarcinomas in different racial/ethnic minorities are understudied. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium 1 database has been investigated to evaluate the frequency and impact of oncogenic drivers in lung adenocarcinomas in the racial/ethnic minority patient population.

  27. Erratum

    1. You have free access to this content
  28. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Medical Oncology
      Unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Systemic plus hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy is associated with longer survival in comparison with systemic chemotherapy alone

      Ioannis T. Konstantinidis, Bas Groot Koerkamp, Richard K. G. Do, Mithat Gönen, Yuman Fong, Peter J. Allen, Michael I. D'Angelica, T. Peter Kingham, Ronald P. DeMatteo, David S. Klimstra, Nancy E. Kemeny and William R. Jarnagin

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29824

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is associated with a dismal prognosis. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with systemic chemotherapy is associated with prolonged survival.

  29. Commentary

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Delivering a research-enabled multistakeholder partnership for enhanced patient care at a population level: The Northern Ireland Comprehensive Cancer Program

      Mark Lawler, Anna Gavin, Manuel Salto-Tellez, Richard D. Kennedy, Sandra Van Schaeybroeck, Richard H. Wilson, Denis Paul Harkin, Margaret Grayson, Ruth E. Boyd, Peter W. Hamilton, Darragh G. McArt, Jacqueline James, Tracy Robson, Robert D. Ladner, Kevin M. Prise, Joe M. O'Sullivan, Timothy Harrison, Liam Murray, Patrick G. Johnston and David J. Waugh

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29814

      • image

      The last 20 years have seen significant advances in cancer care in Northern Ireland, leading to measureable improvements in patient outcomes. Crucial to this transformation has been an ethos that recognizes the primacy role of research in effecting heath care change. The authors' model of a cross-sectoral partnership that unites patients, scientists, health care professionals, hospital trusts, bioindustry, and government agencies can be truly transformative, empowering tripartite clinical-academic-industry efforts that have already yielded significant benefit and will continue to inform strategy and its implementation going forward.

  30. Original Articles

    1. Discipline

      Disparities Research
      Associations among socioeconomic status, patterns of care and outcomes in breast cancer patients in a universal health care system: Ontario's experience

      Alexander Kumachev, Maureen E. Trudeau and Kelvin K. W. Chan

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29838

      • image
      • image

      Higher socioeconomic status is associated with increased receipt of screening and treatments in patients with breast cancer in Ontario, Canada. In addition, higher socioeconomic status is associated with improved overall survival even after adjusting for screening, cancer stage at diagnosis, and treatment patterns.

    2. Outcomes Research
      The rise of concurrent care for veterans with advanced cancer at the end of life

      Vincent Mor, Nina R. Joyce, Danielle L. Coté, Risha A. Gidwani, Mary Ersek, Cari R. Levy, Katherine E. Faricy-Anderson, Susan C. Miller, Todd H. Wagner, Bruce P. Kinosian, Karl A. Lorenz and Scott T. Shreve

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29827

      • image
      • image
      • image

      Concurrent receipt of hospice and chemotherapy or radiation therapy has increased among veterans who die with cancer without reductions in the receipt of cancer therapy. This approach reflects the expansion of hospice services in the Veterans Health Administration with its policy of allowing the concurrent receipt of hospice care and antineoplastic therapies.

  31. Editorial

    1. Genomic profiling of advanced bladder cancer to guide the use of targeted therapeutics

      Angela K. Green and Matthew I. Milowsky

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29825

      As exemplified by the accompanying research article, next-generation sequencing of bladder tumors for clinical decision making facilitates the use of targeted therapies in advanced bladder cancer, a historically underresearched area of oncology. The overall benefit of targeted therapy in bladder cancer remains to be determined, but research efforts are underway.

  32. Original Articles

    1. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      Comprehensive genomic profiling of 295 cases of clinically advanced urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder reveals a high frequency of clinically relevant genomic alterations

      Jeffrey S. Ross, Kai Wang, Depinder Khaira, Siraj M. Ali, Huge A.G. Fisher, Badar Mian, Tipu Nazeer, Julia A. Elvin, Norma Palma, Roman Yelensky, Doron Lipson, Vincent A. Miller, Philip J. Stephens, Vivek Subbiah and Sumanta K. Pal

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29826

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Advanced urothelial carcinoma is an invariably fatal disease, and there is a lack of effective, approved systemic therapies beyond first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. In the current study, the authors identify a high frequency of clinically relevant genomic alterations in a large cohort of patients with advanced disease. Conceivably, these results could inform the rational design of clinical trials of targeted therapies for patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma.

    2. Discipline

      Outcomes Research
      What does Medicaid expansion mean for cancer screening and prevention? Results from a randomized trial on the impacts of acquiring Medicaid coverage

      Bill J. Wright, Alison K. Conlin, Heidi L. Allen, Jennifer Tsui, Matthew J. Carlson and Hsin Fang Li

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29802

      Access to Medicaid appears to significantly increase the use of certain preventive screenings in a low-income population, especially among those with an elevated family risk of cancer. Health insurance expansion might be an important strategy for addressing cancer disparities by ensuring earlier detection in underserved or at-risk populations..

    3. Use of posttreatment imaging and biomarkers in survivors of early-stage breast cancer: Inappropriate surveillance or necessary care?

      Erin E. Hahn, Tania Tang, Janet S. Lee, Corrine E. Munoz-Plaza, Ernest Shen, Braden Rowley, Jared L. Maeda, David M. Mosen, John C. Ruckdeschel and Michael K. Gould

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29811

      • image

      Advanced imaging and serum biomarkers are commonly used for the surveillance of patients with early-stage breast cancer, despite recommendations against this practice. The results of the current study indicate that the use of these nonrecommended services was common within 2 integrated health care systems. However, the majority of posttreatment imaging was performed for diagnostic purposes, whereas the majority of biomarker tests were for routine surveillance.

    4. Quality of Life
      Quality of life and mood predict posttraumatic stress disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

      Areej R. El-Jawahri, Harry B. Vandusen, Lara N. Traeger, Joel N. Fishbein, Tanya Keenan, Emily R. Gallagher, Joseph A. Greer, William F. Pirl, Vicki A. Jackson, Thomas R. Spitzer, Yi-Bin A. Chen and Jennifer S. Temel

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29818

      A significant percentage of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) report symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression at 6 months after HCT, thereby illustrating the substantial psychological burden endured by this population. It is important to note that patients' experiences during their hospitalization for HCT, particularly their decline in quality of life and increase in depression symptoms, appear to be strongly predictive of an increase in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and impaired quality of life at 6 months after HCT.

    5. Disease Site

      Genitourinary Disease
      The high incidence of vascular thromboembolic events in patients with metastatic or unresectable urothelial cancer treated with platinum chemotherapy agents

      Christopher M. Tully, Andrea B. Apolo, Emily C. Zabor, Ashley M. Regazzi, Irina Ostrovnaya, Helena F. Furberg, Jonathan E. Rosenberg and Dean F. Bajorin

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29801

      • image

      Metastatic or unresectable urothelial cancer is associated with a high incidence of vascular thromboembolic events in patients treated with first-line, combination, platinum-based chemotherapy. The vascular thromboembolic event rate is high with both cisplatin-based and carboplatin-based therapy.

    6. Discipline

      Diagnostic Imaging
      Using computer-extracted image phenotypes from tumors on breast magnetic resonance imaging to predict breast cancer pathologic stage

      Elizabeth S. Burnside, Karen Drukker, Hui Li, Ermelinda Bonaccio, Margarita Zuley, Marie Ganott, Jose M. Net, Elizabeth J. Sutton, Kathleen R. Brandt, Gary J. Whitman, Suzanne D. Conzen, Li Lan, Yuan Ji, Yitan Zhu, Carl C. Jaffe, Erich P. Huang, John B. Freymann, Justin S. Kirby, Elizabeth A. Morris and Maryellen L. Giger

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29791

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Although tumor size measured on magnetic resonance imaging is the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage, image analysis algorithms may extract and combine features into a signature that augments this prediction. In fact, computer-extracted breast magnetic resonance imaging phenotypes appear to capture biologic information that can contribute to the prediction of breast cancer pathologic stage.

    7. Disease Site

      Gynecologic Oncology
      Resveratrol inhibits ovarian tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model

      Lijun Tan, Weimin Wang, Gong He, Rork D. Kuick, Gabrielle Gossner, Angela S. Kueck, Heather Wahl, Anthony W. Opipari and J. Rebecca Liu

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cncr.29793

      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image
      • image

      Treatment with resveratrol inhibits glucose uptake and appears to have a significant antineoplastic effect in a preclinical mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer cells are able to use both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Resveratrol treatment suppresses glycolysis in tumor cells with high baseline glycolytic rates. The use of drug combinations that inhibit distinct metabolic pathways may be more effective than monotherapy alone in eliminating cancer cells.

VIEW

  1. 1 - 61

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION