Biotechnology and Bioengineering

Cover image for Vol. 112 Issue 4

Edited By: Douglas S. Clark

Impact Factor: 4.164

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 26/165 (Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology)

Online ISSN: 1097-0290

Featured

  • The future of industrial bioprocessing: Batch or continuous?

    The future of industrial bioprocessing: Batch or continuous?

    Evolution of the MAb production platform. Over the years, product titer and cell productivity increase, thus equipment and batch sizes tend to decrease, while frequency of processing increases, exhibiting an asymptotic trend towards fully continuous processing.

  • The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling

    The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling

    Example surface plots showing the model simulation results over a range of pH values using initial conditions measured and parameters estimated from this study: (A) without bacteria supplementation; (B) with bacteria supplementation.

  • Temperature-dependent control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and virulence by thermoresponsive oligo(N-vinylcaprolactam)

    Temperature‐dependent control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and virulence by thermoresponsive oligo(N‐vinylcaprolactam)

    Temperature-dependent control of S. aureus biofilm formation by OVCL (MW 679). Biofilm formation of S. aureus strain ATCC 6538 was analyzed by confocal laser microscopy (A) and SEM (B) at different temperatures (25 °C or 37 °C). The scale bars represent 100 μm (A) and 3 μm (B), respectively.

  • Effect of chitosan coating on a bacteria-based alginate microrobot

    Effect of chitosan coating on a bacteria‐based alginate microrobot

    Development of a bacteria-based microrobot using the surface modification of alginate microbeads with chitosan. A: Schematic diagram of the proposed bacteria-based microrobot. B: Concept image of weak flagellated bacteria attachment on an alginate microbead. C: Concept image of high flagellated bacteria attachment on a chitosan-coated alginate microbead bacteria. D: Low structural stability of bacteria encapsulated alginate microbeads. E: Enhanced structural stability of bacteria encapsulated chitosan-coated alginate microbeads. The chitosan-uncoated bacteria-encapsulated alginate microbeads showed less hardness than the chitosan-coated bacteria-encapsulated alginate microbeads. The light blue color indicates the alginate microbeads, pink indicates the chitosan coating on the alginate microbeads, and green fluorescent bacteria can be encapsulated and attached on the surface of the microbeads.

  • Long-term three-dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors

    Long‐term three‐dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors

    Perfusion bioreactors. Bioreactors provide countercurrent medium perfusion and gas supply by hollow membrane fibers throughout the cell compartment. Cells are injected through an injection port (bottom right) into the cell compartment (center). Scaffolds were integrated between medium perfusion and gas fiber layers during the manufacturing process of the bioreactors (upper right). Experiments were performed with perfusion bioreactors with and without scaffolds, and controls in conventional static two-dimensional Petri dish culture.

  • 3D bioprinting of biomimetic aortic vascular constructs with self-supporting cells

    3D bioprinting of biomimetic aortic vascular constructs with self‐supporting cells

    Roadmap of the proposed methodology. (a) Segmentation of an aorta from abdominal region based on region growing. (b) The STL (mesh) model of aorta converted to a parametric smooth surface. (c) Representation of the ‘Self-Supporting' method, with vessel (grey), cellular aggregates (red) and support structures (blue). (please see the color version) (d) 3D printed MEF cellular aggregates.

  • Shear stress upregulates IL-1β secretion by Chlamydia pneumoniae- infected monocytes

    Shear stress upregulates IL‐1β secretion by Chlamydia pneumoniae‐ infected monocytes

    C. pneumoniae infection of human monocytes and IL-1β secretion. (A) Human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae at MOI 1 and cultured for up to 72 hours. The adherent cells were fixed at different time points and stained with anti-Chlamydia antibody and DAPI. Cell nuclei (blue), and Chlamydial inclusions (green) are shown. Magnification is 1000 × ; Scale bar is 12 µm. (B) Kinetics of IL-1β release from C. pneumoniae- infected human monocytes. The supernatants from infected human monocytes were collected at 0, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h and analyzed for IL-1β. The results are expressed as mean ± SD of a representative experiment performed in triplicates for one donor.

  • The future of industrial bioprocessing: Batch or continuous?
  • The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling
  • Temperature‐dependent control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and virulence by thermoresponsive oligo(N‐vinylcaprolactam)
  • Effect of chitosan coating on a bacteria‐based alginate microrobot
  • Long‐term three‐dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors
  • 3D bioprinting of biomimetic aortic vascular constructs with self‐supporting cells
  • Shear stress upregulates IL‐1β secretion by Chlamydia pneumoniae‐ infected monocytes

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2015 Gaden Award Winner

Frances H. Arnold
Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor
Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry
Director
Donna and Benjamin M. Rosen Bioengineering Center
California Institute of Technology

Winning Article:

Engineered thermostable fungal Cel6A and Cel7A cellobiohydrolases hydrolyze cellulose efficiently at elevated temperatures
Indira Wu and Frances H. Arnold
Volume 110, Issue 7, pages 1874-1883, July 2013

2015 B&B Daniel I. C. Wang Award

Maciek Antoniewicz
Associate Professor
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
University of Delaware

Viewpoint

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The future of industrial bioprocessing: Batch or continuous?

By Matthew Croughan, Konstantin Konstantinov and Charles Cooney

Matthew Croughan "Continuous Bioprocessing for Certain Scenarios"

Konstantin Konstantinov and Charles Cooney "Integrated Continuous Bioprocessing—should we close down our existing batch facilities?"

In the newest B&B Viewpoint, three pioneers of industrial bioprocessing discuss the future of the field. Will the batch or continuous bioprocessing platform dominate biomanufacturing of human therapeutics down the road? Matthew Croughan, an expert in fed-batch bioprocessing, offers his opinion on this topic in Continuous Bioprocessing for Certain Scenarios while Konstantin Konstantinov and Charles Cooney, experts of continuous bioprocessing, offer theirs in Integrated Continuous Bioprocessing—should we close down our existing batch facilities?"

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