Glia

Cover image for Vol. 65 Issue 5

Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Edited By: Bruce R. Ransom and Helmut Kettenmann

Impact Factor: 5.997

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 25/256 (Neurosciences)

Online ISSN: 1098-1136

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  1. 1 - 16
  1. RESEARCH ARTICLES

    1. Anti-ACSA-2 defines a novel monoclonal antibody for prospective isolation of living neonatal and adult astrocytes

      Christina G. Kantzer, Camille Boutin, Ina D. Herzig, Carolina Wittwer, Sandy Reiß, Marie Catherine Tiveron, Jan Drewes, Thomas D. Rockel, Stefanie Ohlig, Jovica Ninkovic, Harold Cremer, Sandra Pennartz, Melanie Jungblut and Andreas Bosio

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23140

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      Main Points

      Novel anti-astrocyte cell surface antigen-2 antibody (Anti-ACSA-2) labels specifically murine astrocytes, radial glia, neural stem and glial progenitor cells and allows their fast, prospective, acute and viable purification from neonatal and adult brain.

    2. Astrocyte-specific insulin-like growth factor-1 gene transfer in aging female rats improves stroke outcomes

      Andre K. Okoreeh, Shameena Bake and Farida Sohrabji

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23142

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      Main Points

      1. Ischemia-induced damage and disability is worse in middle-aged female rats than young female rats.
      2. Astrocyte-specific gene transfer of IGF-1 improves the immunological response and sensory motor recovery after stroke in middle-aged females.
  2. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. An astroglial basis of major depressive disorder? An overview

      Qian Wang, Wei Jie, Ji-Hong Liu, Jian-Ming Yang and Tian-Ming Gao

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23143

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      Main Points

      Astrocytes display morphological and functional atrophy in patients with depression.

      Dysfunctional astrocytes lead to depressive-like phenotypes.

      Antidepressant treatments may exert their therapeutic effects on astrocytes.

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLES

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Human and mouse cortical astrocytes differ in aquaporin-4 polarization toward microvessels

      Vigdis Andersen Eidsvaag, Rune Enger, Hans-Arne Hansson, Per Kristian Eide and Erlend A. Nagelhus

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23138

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      Main Points

      • Human astrocytes have higher expression of AQP4 water channels in parenchymal membranes than mice
      • The two species have similar AQP4 levels in pericapillary endfeet
      • Thus, AQP4 polarization towards microvessels is less in humans than in mice
    2. HuR promotes the molecular signature and phenotype of activated microglia: Implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases

      Prachi Matsye, Lei Zheng, Ying Si, Soojin Kim, Wenyi Luo, David K. Crossman, Preston E. Bratcher and Peter H. King

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23137

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      Main Points

      • HuR knockdown suppressed genes associated with activated microglia.
      • Loss of HuR attenuates microglial chemotaxis and migration.
      • HuR is upregulated in ALS-associated microglia.
  4. REVIEW ARTICLES

    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Astroglia as a cellular target for neuroprotection and treatment of neuro-psychiatric disorders

      Beihui Liu, Anja G. Teschemacher and Sergey Kasparov

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23136

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      Main Points

      Many processes localized in astroglia are potentially neuroprotective. In this review we examine how astroglial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration and major neurological disorders and explore potential drug targets localized to astrocytes.

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLES

    1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces Ca2+ signaling and CXCL1 release via TRPC6 channel in astrocytes

      Hisashi Shirakawa, Rumi Katsumoto, Shota Iida, Takahito Miyake, Takuya Higuchi, Takuya Nagashima, Kazuki Nagayasu, Takayuki Nakagawa and Shuji Kaneko

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23141

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      Main Points

      • Activation of Gq-coupled receptors S1P2 and S1P3 by S1P triggers Ca2+ influx through TRPC6, which results in MAPK activation and increased secretion of the proinflammatory or neuroprotective chemokine CXCL1 in astrocyte in vitro.
    2. CD38 positively regulates postnatal development of astrocytes cell-autonomously and oligodendrocytes non-cell-autonomously

      Tsuyoshi Hattori, Minoru Kaji, Hiroshi Ishii, Roboon Jureepon, Mika Takarada-Iemata, Hieu Minh Ta, Thuong Manh Le, Ayumu Konno, Hirokazu Hirai, Yoshitake Shiraishi, Noriyuki Ozaki, Yasuhiko Yamamoto, Hiroshi Okamoto, Shigeru Yokoyama, Haruhiro Higashida, Yasuko Kitao and Osamu Hori

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23139

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      Main Points

      • CD38-deficient mice exhibit impaired development of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes.
      • CD38 increases astrocytic Cx43 expression by reducing NAD+ level.
      • Cx43 promotes astrocytic maturation and OL differentiation.
    3. SNAT3-mediated glutamine transport in perisynaptic astrocytes in situ is regulated by intracellular sodium

      Alison C. Todd, Mari-Carmen Marx, Sarah R. Hulme, Stefan Bröer and Brian Billups

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23133

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      Main Points

      • Astrocytes in situ transport glutamine via the SNAT3 transporter.
      • EAAT activation causes a rise in [Na+]i, which alters the SNAT3 equilibrium to release glutamine.
      • This links neuronal activity to the supply of a neurotransmitter precursor from glia.
    4. Microglial repopulation resolves inflammation and promotes brain recovery after injury

      Rachel A. Rice, Jason Pham, Rafael J. Lee, Allison R. Najafi, Brian L. West and Kim N. Green

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23135

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      Main Points

      Microglia remain chronically activated after neuronal injury, further damaging the brain. Replacing these microglia using CSF1R inhibitors leads to resolution of the inflammatory response and promotes functional recovery.

    5. E6020, a synthetic TLR4 agonist, accelerates myelin debris clearance, Schwann cell infiltration, and remyelination in the rat spinal cord

      Jamie S. Church, Lindsay M. Milich, Jessica K. Lerch, Phillip G. Popovich and Dana M. McTigue

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23132

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      Main Points

      1. E6020 promotes beneficial macrophage and oligodendrocyte lineage cell responses.
      2. Macrophage TLR4 activation increases myelin uptake and degradation.
      3. Intraspinal TLR4 activation increases Schwann cell recruitment and remyelination in the CNS.
    6. The balance between cathepsin C and cystatin F controls remyelination in the brain of Plp1-overexpressing mouse, a chronic demyelinating disease model

      Takahiro Shimizu, Wilaiwan Wisessmith, Jiayi Li, Manabu Abe, Kenji Sakimura, Banthit Chetsawang, Yoshinori Sahara, Koujiro Tohyama, Kenji F. Tanaka and Kazuhiro Ikenaka

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23134

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      Main Points

      • The balance between cystatin F (CysF) and cathepsin C (CatC) regulates remyelination in a mouse model of demyelinating disease.
      • CysF and CatC knockdown, and CatC overexpression in microglia were generated using a versatile gene manipulation system.
    7. Axon contact-driven Schwann cell dedifferentiation

      Jennifer Soto and Paula V. Monje

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23131

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      Main Points

      • A membrane-bound activity specifically expressed in sensory axons (ADDA) prevents Schwann cell differentiation and elicits dedifferentiation by overriding pro-myelinating signals such as cAMP and Krox-20.
      • ADDA-induced dedifferentiation occurs independently of mitogenic signals, ErbB and cJun/JNK activity.
  6. Review Articles

    1. How a radial glial cell decides to become a multiciliated ependymal cell

      Christina Kyrousi, Zoi Lygerou and Stavros Taraviras

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23118

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      Main Points

      • GemC1/Lynkeas and McIdas are key regulators of RGCs commitment to the ependymal lineage
      • GemC1/Lynkeas and McIdas activate the transcription of Foxj1 and c-Myb
    2. The logistics of myelin biogenesis in the central nervous system

      Nicolas Snaidero and Mikael Simons

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23116

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      Main Points

      • Different modes of myelination are likely to co-exist in the CNS
      • A “basal” mode forms myelin early in development
      • A “targeted“ mode may regulate myelination later in development according to the need of the network
    3. Corneal epithelial cells function as surrogate schwann cells for their sensory nerves

      Mary Ann Stepp, Gauri Tadvalkar, Raymond Hakh and Sonali Pal-Ghosh

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/glia.23102

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      Main points

      1. Intraepithelial corneal nerves (ICNs) of the cornea project for millimeters with no glial support.
      2. Corneal epithelial cell (CEC) plasma membranes wrap around bundles of ICNs.
      3. Axon fragments are phagocytized by CECs after crush injuries.
      4. CECs function like Schwann cells in supporting ICNs.

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