Science Education

Cover image for Vol. 100 Issue 4

Edited by Sherry Southerland and John Settlage

Impact Factor: 1.8

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 28/230 (Education & Educational Research)

Online ISSN: 1098-237X

Featured

  • Testing Predictors of Instructional Practice in Elementary Science Education: The Significant Role of Accountability

    Testing Predictors of Instructional Practice in Elementary Science Education: The Significant Role of Accountability

    Comparison of teachers’ average reported and preferred instructional practices (percent).

  • Learning to Feel Like a Scientist

    Learning to Feel Like a Scientist

    Jordan (in the black shirt) begins to challenge Alyssa.

  • Molecular Mechanistic Reasoning: Toward Bridging the Gap Between the Molecular and Cellular Levels in Life Science Education

    Molecular Mechanistic Reasoning: Toward Bridging the Gap Between the Molecular and Cellular Levels in Life Science Education

    The lock-and-key principle, as presented in the two most-used biology textbooks in the Netherlands. (A) is adapted from Biologie voor jou (2008, Utrecht, The Netherlands: Malmberg); (B) is adapted from Nectar (2006, Groningen, The Netherlands: Wolters-Noordhof).

  • Insights Into the Diversity of Attitudes Concerning Evolution and Creation: A Multidimensional Approach

    Insights Into the Diversity of Attitudes Concerning Evolution and Creation: A Multidimensional Approach

    Attitude profiles from LCA analysis. Figure shows the mean scores on attitude items (n = 1672). Error bars indicate standard error. Item score: 1 = strongly disagree, …, 4 = strongly agree. An item score of 2.5 corresponds to the neutral point. For better readability, evaluations on single items have been connected to an attitude profile. Connection lines do not represent mathematical relationships; they are used for representational purposes only. With respect to the attitude constructs “attitudes toward evolutionary theory” and “attitudes toward the Biblical accounts of creation,” high scores indicate a positive attitude. Concerning “creationist beliefs” and “scientistic beliefs,” high scores indicate a high agreement with corresponding beliefs.

  • Development of Mechanistic Reasoning and Multilevel Explanations of Ecology in Third Grade Using Agent-Based Models

    Development of Mechanistic Reasoning and Multilevel Explanations of Ecology in Third Grade Using Agent‐Based Models

    Diagram of a food web. Source: Matthew C. Perry; U.S. Geological Survey. “Chapter 14: Changes in Food and Habitats of Waterbirds.” Figure 14.1. Synthesis of U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem and Implications for Environmental Management. USGS Circular 1316. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chesapeake_Waterbird_Food_Web.jpg

  • Testing Predictors of Instructional Practice in Elementary Science Education: The Significant Role of Accountability
  • Learning to Feel Like a Scientist
  • Molecular Mechanistic Reasoning: Toward Bridging the Gap Between the Molecular and Cellular Levels in Life Science Education
  • Insights Into the Diversity of Attitudes Concerning Evolution and Creation: A Multidimensional Approach
  • Development of Mechanistic Reasoning and Multilevel Explanations of Ecology in Third Grade Using Agent‐Based Models

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This Virtual Issue presents empirical research that blurs the boundary between learning sciences and informal science education research in an effort to advance key issues of importance to education about the nature of learning and engagement in out-of-school settings. This issue has a special focus on studies providing insights into the design and facilitation of learning in out-of-school time.

The six articles, introduction, and commentary examine the opportunities, challenges, and barriers that exist when bridging the learning sciences and informal science learning fields. The issue’s articles explore three themes to advance educational research: (a) applying learning science theory to the design of informal science education spaces, (b) designing for equitable engagement to support out-of-school learning, and (c) facilitating social science learning of families.

We are pleased to announce that the next editors of Science Education will be Sherry A. Southerland, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA and John Settlage, University of Connecticut, Mansfield, Connecticut, USA.

Please see the editorial in the May 2016 issue of Science Education, entitled "Announcing the new Editors-in-Chief for Science Education".

Focus on … Scientific Practices

Introduction to the Focus on … Scientific Practices
Sibel Erduran
Volume 99, Issue 6

The Focus feature in this issue is “scientific practices.” The four essays draw on a range of perspectives to interrogate what is meant by scientific practices and how scientific practices can be incorporated in science education. The discussion is timely given the emerging curriculum emphasis on scientific practices, for instance in the Next Generation Science Standards in the United States. However, it should be noted, as the authors also illustrate, that the notion of scientific practices has been addressed from a range of research traditions such as Science Studies for several decades. Science education research and curriculum policy communities could benefit from characterizations of scientific practices offered by the Science Studies literature. The essays should help orient readers to some key references in the Science Studies tradition and, in doing so, illustrate some cutting-edge thinking on scientific practices today with implications for science education. READ MORE

Scientific Practice and Science Education
Cyrus C. M. Mody

Describing “Science Practice” in Learning Settings
David Stroupe

Educational Implications of Choosing “Practice” to Describe Science in the Next Generation Science Standards
Michael J. Ford

Can We Teach People What Science Is Really Like?
Harry Collins

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