Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 54 Issue 19

Online ISSN: 1099-0488

Associated Title(s): Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry

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J. Polym. Sci. B Polym. Phys. publishes papers on the physics of polymers, including applications, theory and modeling, and experiments. 2015 ISI Impact Factor: 3.318.



Recently Published Articles

  1. Viscoelastic properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) with high glass transition temperature by lithium salt addition

    Azusa Miyagawa, Viknasvarri Ayerdurai, Shogo Nobukawa and Masayuki Yamaguchi

    Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.24227

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    The lithium salt addition enhances the glass transition temperature for poly(methyl methacrylate), owing to the ion-dipole interaction, which has a life time at high temperature.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of monodisperse/bidisperse polymer melt crystallization

    Vasilii Triandafilidi, Jörg Rottler and Savvas G. Hatzikiriakos

    Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.24142

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    Molecular mechanisms behind the crystallization of polydisperse polymer melts remain an unsolved problem in polymer physics and have a huge importance in applications such as injection molding and fiber blowing. In the current work, the crystallization of polydisperse melts is simulated by identifying the mechanisms behind bidisperse blend crystallization. Here, crystallization of polydisperse melts is studied with computer simulations in order to identify the mechanisms behind bidisperse blend crystallization.

  3. Influence of fluorination on the microstructure and performance of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based polymer solar cells

    Chao Wang, Christian J. Mueller, Eliot Gann, Amelia C. Y. Liu, Mukundan Thelakkat and Christopher R. McNeill

    Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.24151

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    Moderate fluorination of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based polymers is shown to be a promising approach for improving the photovoltage of DPP-based polymer solar cells. Bifluorination of the phenyl ring in the polymer PDPP[T]2–TPT leads to improved open-circuit voltage (VOC) while largely preserving the near-optimal nanomorphology. Tetrafluorination however leads to worse cell performance despite VOC further improving to 0.81 V due to coarse phase separation.

  4. Extraordinary transport behavior of gases in isothermally annealed poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) membranes

    Ywu-Jang Fu, Cheng-Lee Lai, Chien-Chieh Hu, Yi-Ming Sun, Shuan-Ying Wu, Jung-Tsai Chen, Shu-Hsien Huang, Wei-Song Hung and Kueir-Rarn Lee

    Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.24150

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    Gases permeable crystalline regions formed during isothermal annealing of PMP membranes. A three-phase model used to explain the change of free volume parameters and crystalline structure. Correlations between the positron annihilation lifetime data of annealed PMP and the transport properties of gases through PMP membranes suggest that the free volume elements in rigid amorphous fractions controls the gas separation, whereas the dominant parameter controlling the flux is the free volume elements in mobile amorphous fractions.

  5. Sliding threshold of spike-rate dependent plasticity of a semiconducting polymer/electrolyte cell

    Wenshuai Dong, Fei Zeng, Yuandong Hu, Chiating Chang, Xiaojun Li, Feng Pan and Guoqi Li

    Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.24152

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    A threshold (θm) of depression to potentiation is sliding for an MEH-PPV/PEO-Nd3+ artificial synaptic cell. A previous inhibitory signal moves θm to a lower frequency, while a previous excitation signal moves θm to a higher frequency. This phenomenon agrees well with the BCM learning theory and stems from the modification of the internal state (i.e., Nd3+ flux). This demonstrates adaptivity as well as stability for our device.

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