Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Cover image for Vol. 103 Issue 8

Edited By: Dr. Ronald T. Borchardt

Impact Factor: 3.007

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 20/58 (Chemistry Medicinal); 43/148 (Chemistry Multidisciplinary); 76/254 (Pharmacology & Pharmacy)

Online ISSN: 1520-6017


Author Guidelines


NIH Public Access Mandate
For those interested in the Wiley-Blackwell policy on the NIH Public Access Mandate, please visit our policy statement

Author Services – Online production tracking is now available for your article through Wiley-Blackwell's Author Services. Author Services enables authors to track their article - once it has been accepted - through the production process to publication online and in print. Authors can check the status of their articles online and choose to receive automated emails at key stages of production. The author will receive an email with a unique link that enables them to register and have their article automatically added to the system. Please ensure that a complete email address is provided when submitting the manuscript. Visit http://authorservices.wiley.com for more details on online production tracking and for a wealth of resources including FAQs and tips on article preparation, submission and more.



Author Guidelines


All submitted manuscripts should contain previously unpublished original research. Submitted manuscripts should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere.

1. Online Submission and Peer Review

Authors should ensure that papers conform to the scientific and style instructions given below. In order to expedite the publication process the Journal requires that manuscripts be submitted online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpharmsci .

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences has a completely digital submission, review, and production process. We therefore ask for production-quality files at the time of submission of your manuscript. This will speed the production and distribution of your work across a variety of print and electronic platforms. If you don’t follow the simple guidelines given below, your submission will be returned to you for additional revision. This will of course delay review and, in the event that your work is accepted, would delay publication. Therefore we ask that you pay careful attention at this time and we thank you for your cooperation.

If you have not already done so, create an account for yourself in the system at the submission site, http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpharmsci by clicking on the "Create an Account" button (you may check the progress of your manuscript throughout the review process by logging in and checking your    Author   Center). Please follow on-screen instructions and the system will guide you through the submission process. At the “File Manager” screen, you will be asked to upload manuscript files. Please designate the Peer-Review Version of your manuscript (incorporating all elements) as a “File For Review” (by selecting “Yes” in the drop-down box). Production-ready files (separate elements) should be designated as “Files Not For Review” (by selecting “No” in the drop-down box).

Online help is available to you at all times during the process. You are also able to exit/re-enter at any stage before finally "submitting" your work. All submissions are kept strictly confidential. You may contact the Journal's Editorial Assistant, Tammy Dunning, at tdunning@ku.edu, or at tel.785-864-5919, fax 785-864-5875.

TEXT
Submit your text in DOC format. Do not embed figures or tables in this document. These should be submitted as separate files.

TABLES
Tables should be created with a word processor and saved in either DOC or RTF format. Do not embed tables in your text. Tables should be on separate pages and saved as one file in DOC format.

FIGURES
To ensure the highest print quality, your figures should be submitted in either TIF or EPS format at 300 dpi. For more instructions on preparing high quality figures, please see our Graphics FAQ.

COLOR FIGURES
In addition to the above resolution guidelines, color figures must be submitted in a CMYK color. Do not submit color figures as RGB.

2. Scope of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

JPharmSci® focuses on two major questions of importance to pharmaceutical scientists: (i) What are the physical and biological barriers that limit the access of drugs to their therapeutic targets?; and (ii) How can drugs, excipients, traditional formulations, novel drug delivery systems and drug products be designed to maximize therapeutic efficacy? Answers to these questions have in the past and will in the future be forthcoming from research in a variety of scientific disciplines including but not limited to the following: physical pharmacy; pharmaceutics; pharmaceutical technology; drug delivery; pharmaceutical engineering; materials science; nanotechnology; animal, human, cellular and molecular biopharmaceutics; animal and human pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics; drug metabolism and transport; biotechnology; medical chemistry, including drug design and prodrug strategies; biophysical chemistry; analytical and bioanalytical chemistry; physical organic, organic, and computational chemistry; molecular modeling; immunology; biochemistry; and cell and molecular biology. The scientific content of manuscripts submitted to JPharmSci® should fit into one of the following subject categories:

Drug Discovery-Development Interface: Manuscripts in this scientific category should include descriptions of quantitative and mechanistic research in pharmaceutics, biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and drug metabolism and transport that are normally conducted during the discovery of organic chemistry-based and biotechnology-based hits, leads and potential drug candidates. Research results of particular interest to the readers of JPharmSci®  would include those that afford valuable, new information about how a molecule's in vitro and in vivo behavior are influenced by its molecular and physico-chemical properties, traditional formulations and novel delivery systems used in lead optimization studies. This scientific category would also encompass manuscripts that describe: (i) new and novel analytical methodologies and that would facilitate and/or more accurately and completely characterize the physico-chemical and biological properties of hits, leads and potential drug candidates; and (ii) new and novel formulations strategies and drug delivery systems, including those built on bio-and nanotechnologies, that would enhance the delivery of these molecules to their pharmacological targets in animal models.

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology: Manuscripts in this scientific category should include descriptions of quantitative and mechanistic research in pharmaceutics, drug delivery and pharmaceutical technology that are normally conducted during the preclinical and clinical drug development of biotechnology-based drug candidates and drugs (e.g. peptides, proteins, antibodies, vaccines, DNA, RNA). Research results of particular interest to the readers of JPharmSci® would include those that afford valuable, new information about how a molecule's in vitro and in vivo behavior is influenced by its molecular and physico-chemical properties, traditional formulations and novel drug delivery systems used in preclinical and clinical studies and the manufacturing processes that give rise to the final drug product. This scientific category would also encompass manuscripts that describe: (i) new and novel analytical methodologies that would facilitate and/or more accurately and completely characterize the physico-chemical and biological properties of biotechnology-based drug candidates and drugs; and (ii) new and novel formulations strategies and drug delivery systems, including those built on bio-and nanotechnologies, that would enhance the delivery of these types of molecules to their pharmacological targets in animals and humans.

Pharmaceutics, Drug Delivery and Pharmaceutical Technology:

Manuscripts in this scientific category should include descriptions of quantitative and mechanistic research in pharmaceutics, drug delivery and pharmaceutical technology that are normally conducted during the preclinical and clinical development of organic chemistry-based drugs based drugs or drug candidates. Research results of particular interest to the readers of JPharmSci® would include those that afford valuable, new information about how the in vitro and in vivo behavior of a drug molecule or formulation excipient is influenced by its molecular and physico-chemical properties, traditional formulations and novel drug delivery systems used in pre-clinical and clinical studies and the manufacturing processes that give rise to the final drug product. This scientific category also encompasses manuscripts that describe: (i) new and novel analytical methodologies that facilitate and/or more accurately and completely characterize physico-chemical and biological properties of biotechnology-based drugs and drug candidates; (ii) new and novel pro-drug strategies and formulation strategies and drug delivery systems, including those built on bio- and nanotechnologies, that enhance the delivery of these types of molecules to their pharmacological targets in animals and humans; and (iii) new and novel developments in manufacturing of drugs and drug delivery systems, including continuous manufacturing and the Quality by Design concept.

Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology:

Manuscripts in this scientific category should describe quantitative and mechanistic experimental or theoretical research in nanoscale-based pharmaceuticals or diagnostics in which the innovation resides specifically in the nanoscale aspects of the work. Manuscripts reporting advances in pharmaceutical nanotechnology that are being disclosed for the first time would be of particular interest. Suitable topics in this category include advances in the fabrication of nanoscale materials with demonstrably new or significant functionality potential for pharmaceutical applications. Additional topics include improved quantitative methods of characterization of nanoscale pharmaceutical materials and mechanistic studies that contribute to an improved understanding of functionality of nanoscale-based technologies with clear therapeutic implications. The manuscript's conclusions should be supported by relevant in vitro and/or in vivo experimenal data and appropriate statistical analysis. Notable exceptions to the requirement for appropriate physical and biological characterization are : (i) comprehensive and complete theoretical or computational studies; and (ii) meta-analyses of historical data or reviews of the existing literature.

Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Transport and Metabolism:

Manuscripts in this scientific category should encompass quantitative and mechanistic research normally conducted during the preclinical and clinical drug development of organic chemistry-based or biotechnology-based drug candidates or drugs that affords valuable, new information (e.g. drug-drug interactions) about the molecule's in vitro metabolism and/or in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and how these properties relate to the molecule's in vivo pharmacological and toxicological properties. This scientific category would also encompass manuscripts that describe new and novel analytical methodologies that would facilitate and/or more accurately and completely characterize the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic and drug metabolism and transport properties of these types of drug candidates and drugs in animals and humans.

Global Health: Manuscripts in this scientific category should encompass descriptions of quantitative and mechanistic research in pharmaceutics, biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and metabolism and transport properties that are normally conducted during the discovery of organic chemistry-based and biotechnology-based hits, leads and potential drug candidates and the preclinical and clinical development of drug candidates and drugs targeting diseases common in developing countries. Research results of particular interest to the readers of JPharmSci® would include those that afford valuable, new information about how a molecule's in vitro and in vivo behavior are influenced by its molecular and physico-chemical properties, traditional formulations, novel drug delivery systems and manufacturing processes. The scientific category would also encompass manuscripts that describe new and novel analytical methodologies that would facilitate and/or more accurately and completely characterize the pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug metabolism, drug delivery and manufacturing properties of these types of drug candidates and drugs in animals and humans.

3. Types of Manuscripts.

The Editor-in-Chief and one Editor, as well as members of the Journal's Editorial Advisory Board and independant experts, will review most manuscripts submitted to JPharmSci®. However, the Editor-in-Chief and the Editors reserve the right to reject a manuscript without conducting an in-depth review if they feel that the manuscript is "out of scope" or it does not meet the minimal acceptance criteria for publication in JPharmSci®.

Rapid Communications are preliminary accounts of significant and original experimental and/or theoretical results that fit within the scope of JPharmSci®. The results must be of sufficient significance, originality and general interest to justify accelerated publication. Authors are asked to write their manuscripts in a clear and concise manner and to include only data crucial to arriving at their final conclusions. Preferably manuscripts should not exceed 2,000 words of text and a total of 4 figures and/or tables. Extra experimental and/or theoretical data in the form of figures and tables should be deposited under Supporting Information.

Research Articles are comprehensive accounts of significant and original experimental and/or theoretical results that fit within the scope of JPharmSci®. Authors are asked to write their manuscripts in a clear and concise manner and to include only data crucial to arriving at their final conclusions. Preferably manuscripts should not exceed, 5,500 words of text and a total of 8 figures and/or tables. Extra experimental and/or theoretical data in the form of figures and tables should be deposited under Supporting Information.


Notes differ from Rapid Communications in that they are final reports and from Research Articles in that they are limited in scope. Authors are asked to write their manuscripts in a clear and concise manner and to include only data crucial to arriving at their final conclusions. Preferably manuscripts should not exceed 2,000 words of text and a total of 4 figures and/or tables. Extra experimental and/or theoretical data in the form of figures and tables should be deposited under Supporting Information.

Lessons Learned are short articles (600 words) which provide authors with a means of informing other scientists about critical issues, experiences and observations, the descriptions of which would not be appropriate for a typical Research Article, Communication, Note, Commentary or Review. Examples include, but are not limited to, key insights into an unanticipated manufacturing problem, knowledge accumulated over a career of "tricks of the trade" for a given analytical or formulation method, how to avoid a mistake that is repeated over and over again by scientists in industry and academia. Each article will be reviewed directly by an Editor who has expertise in the relevant scientific area. Because each of these articles represents the personal opinion, experience and/or insights of the author(s), data are not required (but could be described) nor does the identity of a given drug need to be divulged. Articles may contain up to three key references.

General Commentaries, Global Health Commentaries and Clinical Trials and Translation Medicine Commentaries (by invitation only) present author’s considered opinion on a scientific or technical subjects within the scope JPharm Sci®. If the Commentary criticizes an article published in the JPharmSci®, the authors of the original article will be given an opportunity to reply in the same issue in which the Commentary is published. An author interested in preparing a Commentary for JPharmSci® should provide a brief outline to Professor John Carpenter (Editor in charge of General Commentaries and Global Health Commentaries) or Professor Rodney Ho(Editor in charge of Clinical Trials and Translational Medicine), requesting an invitation to submit a manuscript in one one of these categories.


Perspectives (by invitation only) articles summarize the viewpoints of distinguished pharmaceutical scientists with regard to the current status and future direction of the field. Perspectives are similar in length to Commentaries and Reviews, and may be submitted only by invitation. An author interested in preparing a Prespective for JPharmSci® should provide a brief outline to Professor John Carpenter requesting an invitation to submit a manuscript in this category.


Reviews (by invitation only) provide a comprehensive summary of broadly-based topics of general interest to pharmaceutical scientists. Reviews are not limited as to the number of words, tables, figures and references that may be included. An author interested in preparing a Review for JPharmSci® should provide a brief outline to Professor John Carpenter requesting an invitation to submit a manuscript in this category.


Minireviews (by invitation only) are well-focused, well-documented examinations of timely issues in the pharmaceutical sciences. The issues may be of a controversial nature, or may address a more narrowly focused area than those typically covered in a Review. Minireviews are limited to approximately 3,000-4,000 words, including tables, figures and references. An author interested in preparing a Minireview for JPharmSci® should provide a brief outline to Professor John Carpenter requesting an invitation to submit a manuscript in this category.

4. Preparation of Manuscripts.

(a) General Considerations. In order to expedite peer review, authors are required to submit their manuscripts online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpharmsci . (See Section 1 above for details about the on-line submission process.)

Authors should write manuscripts in clear, concise English. The responsibility for all aspects of manuscript preparation rests with the authors. Authors should note that extensive changes or rewriting of the manuscript will not be undertaken by the editors.

There are no page charges for publication in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

(b) Suggested Reviewers. The Journal requires that submitting authors suggest at least four reviewers, up to a maximum of six reviewers, two of which must be Editorial Advisory Board (EAB) members; one must be a Scientific Advisor. Please include suggested reviewers' contact information. A list of Editorial Advisory Board (EAB) members and a list of Scientific Advisors can be found by clicking on the corresponding link.

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/societyimages/jpharmsci/List_of_EAB_Members_Keywords.xlsx

 

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/societyimages/jpharmsci/List%20of%20Scientific%20Advisor%20Keyword%20List.xlsx

(c) Title. Titles are of great importance for current awareness and for information retrieval. The wording of titles should be chosen carefully to provide information on the contents and to function as "points of entry" for information retrieval. Symbols, formulas, or arbitrary abbreviations should not be included in the title, except chemical symbols to indicate the structure of isotopically labeled compounds.

(d) Abstract. The abstract should briefly (80-200 words) present, in one paragraph, the problem and experimental approach and state the major findings and conclusions. It should be self-explanatory and suitable for reproduction without rewriting. Footnotes or undefined abbreviations may not be used. If a reference must be cited, complete publication data must be given.

(e) Keywords. Please provide up to 10 keywords that reflect the scientific content of your manuscript. At least 5 of your selected keywords must come from the Journal's official keyword list ( Official Keyword List (.pdf) ). In addition to facilitating indexing of articles, our keyword system assists in the assignment of qualified reviewers for your manuscript. In addition, each member of our Editorial Advisory Board has selected keywords that are applicable to their own work.

(f) Abbreviations. Abbreviations are used without periods. Standard abbreviations should be used throughout the manuscript. All nonstandard abbreviations should be kept to a minimum and must be defined in the text following their first use and in a footnote at the beginning of the manuscript.

(g) QSAR/QSPR. All manuscripts dealing with quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR) must identify individual chemical structures using Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) SciFinder. To aid authors in the use of CAS SciFinder for structure searching, please click here for a Commentary written by Dr. Christopher Lipinski describing the procedure. This Commentary appears in Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 91(12): 2470-2472.

(h) Experimental Section. The experimental procedures should be described in sufficient detail to enable others to repeat the experiments. Names of products and manufacturers [with city, state, and country (if other than the U.S.)] should be included only if alternate sources are deemed unsatisfactory. Brand names may be used only once in the manuscript. For subsequent designation, use "formulation A", product B", etc. Novel experimental procedures should be described in detail, but published procedures should merely be referred to by literature citation of both the original and any published modifications. The purity of key compounds and descriptions(s) of the method(s) used to determine purity should be included in this section. For buffers, use terminology such as "20 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.7) containing...". Also, state w/v or v/v when appropriate.

Identification of and precautions for handling hazardous chemicals and dangerous procedures should be placed at the beginning of the section. An example would be " Caution: The following chemicals are hazardous and should be handled carefully; (list of chemicals and handling procedures or references) ".

Manuscripts containing data generated from animal and/or human studies must specify the committee and the institution that approved the experimental protocols used to generate these data.

(i) Results. The results should be presented concisely. Tables and figures should be designed to maximize the presentation and comprehension of the experimental data. Attention should be paid to the matter of significant figures (usually, no more than three). The same data should not be presented in more than one figure or in both a figure and a table. As a rule, interpretation of the results should be reserved for the discussion section of a Research Article , but under some circumstances it may be desirable to combine results and discussion in a single section.

(j) Discussion. The purpose of the discussion is to interpret the results and to relate them to existing knowledge in the field in as clear and brief a fashion as possible. Information given elsewhere in the manuscript should not be repeated in the discussion. Extensive reviews of the literature should be avoided.

(k) References and Notes. Literature references and notes must be numbered in one consecutive series by order of mention in the text, with numbers as unparenthesized superscripts. The accuracy of the references is the responsibility of the author. The complete list of references and notes should be typed double-spaced on separate page(s) at the end of the manuscript and follow the format shown. All references should include titles. For journals: Yoneto K, Li SK, Higuchi WI, Jiskoot W, Herron JN 1996. Fluorescence probe studies of the interactions of 1-alkyl-2-pyrrolidones with stratum corneum lipid liposomes. J Pharm Sci 85:511-517. For edited books: Rall TW, Schleifer LS. 1985. Drugs effective in the therapy of the epilepsies. In Gilman AG, Goodman LS, Rall TW, Murad F, editors. The pharmacological basis of therapeutics, 7th ed., New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. p 446-472. List submitted manuscripts as "in press" only if formally accepted for publication; otherwise, use "unpublished results" after the names of authors. Any footnotes to the text should be incorporated in the correct numerical sequence with the references.

(l) Supporting Information. The Supporting Information format of this journal can accommodate and make readily available almost any type of supplementary figures or data (e.g., reproductions of spectra, experimental procedures, tabulated data, expanded discussion of peripheral findings, etc.). The author should include a Supporting Information Available statement that describes the material at the end of the printed manuscript text. Consult a current issue of the Journal for the proper wording of this statement. Supporting Information should be clear and of high contrast (suitable for direct photoreproduction) and submitted in quadruplicate on 8.5- × 11-in. paper. All pages of Supporting Information must be consecutively numbered. Captions or legends for figures, spectra, etc., must appear directly on the figure. Supporting Information is available free of charge via the Internet (www.wileyonlinelibrary.com).

(m) Acknowledgments. This section should acknowledge financial support, technical assistance, advice from colleagues, gifts, etc. Permission must be received from persons whose contribution to the work is acknowledged in the manuscript.

(n) Spectral Data. It may be desirable to include such data for representative compounds in a series, for novel classes of compounds, and in structural determinations. Usually, it is not desirable to include routine spectral data for every compound in the manuscript. Papers where interpretations of spectra are critical to structural elucidation and those in which band shape or fine structure needs to be illustrated may be published with spectra included. When such presentations are deemed essential, only pertinent sections should be reproduced.

 (o) Experimental Data. Experimental methods must be referenced or described in sufficient detail to permit the experiments to be repeated by others. Detailed descriptions of experimental methods should be placed in the experimental procedures section. Data may be presented as numerical expressions in tables or in graphical form with no duplication of information in the text. If tables or figures include a minimal number of experimental values (< four), the data should be presented in the text. Units should be abbreviated without punctuation and with no distinction between singular and plural forms (e.g., 1 mg, 25 mg).If possible, statistical significance of the experimental data should be provided. Statistical probability ( p ) in tables, figures, figure legends and text should be expressed as * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, and *** p < 0.001. For multiple comparisons within a table, footnotes italicized in lower case, superscript letters should be used and defined in the table legend. References to statistical methods of calculation should be provided. If statistical limits cannot be provided, the number of determinations and some indication of the variability and reliability of the results should be provided. For animal experimental data, doses and concentrations should be expressed as molar quantities (e.g., mmol/kg, mM) when comparisons are made between compounds having large differences in molecular weights. The routes of administration of test compounds and vehicles used should be indicated. For animal and human studies, authors must specify the committee and the institution that approved the experimental protocols used to generate these data.

If experimental data on proprietary compounds (i.e. compounds whose chemical structures are not available in the public domain) and/or using proprietary procedures (i.e. experimantal procedures and/or components of procedures that are not described in the public domain) are provided in a manuscript, authors should carefully read the next two paragraphs.

Traditionally, scientific papers must reveal sufficient information for the work to be repeated by others. That tradition led to the policy that JPharmSci™ has applied to manuscripts that contain information on proprietary small molecules. This policy essentially states that information pertaining to proprietary (small molecule) compounds can be published providing that, in the opinion of the reviewers and editors, the paper would be publishable based solely on the information derived from studies of known compounds. Thus, information on proprietary compounds has been considered to be supplemental while the decision to publish or not has relied on compounds for which structures were disclosed.

Studies of proprietary proteins and other biologicals pose a difficult situation for JPharmSci™. In some cases, complete structures may not have been determined or, even if the structure is available, compounds having identical structures may be difficult for others to generate (e.g., the amino acid sequences of immunoglobulin hypervariable regions). Yet, interesting studies of proprietary biologicals can nevertheless be envisioned that may be deemed to have sufficient value that the failure to reveal detailed structural information should not be a deterrent to publication. Therefore, the journal will determine the acceptability of such papers on an individual basis. Decisions of acceptability will be made using the following criteria: (a) the structural information provided is adequate for the purpose of evaluating the paper using rigorous scientific standards; (b) the structural information provided is sufficient to enable others to verify the results by conducting essentially the same experiments; and (c) the work is judged to be of sufficient importance that a lack of complete structural information does not significantly detract from its scientific contributions.

(p) Tables. Tabulation of experimental results is encouraged when this leads to more effective presentation or to more economical use of space. Tables should be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals. Provide a brief title with each table and a brief heading for each column. Clearly indicate the units of measure (preferably SI). Data should be rounded to the nearest significant figure. Explanatory material referring to the whole table is to be included as a footnote to the title (a). Footnotes in tables should be given lower case letter designations and cited in the tables as italicized superscripts. Tables that require special treatment, such as insertion of arrows or other special symbols under or over alphanumeric characters, or contain many structures should be submitted as camera-ready copy. All tables should be cited in the text.

(q) Illustrations. The quality of the illustrations printed in your paper depends on the quality of the originals you provide. Electronic submission of illustrations is required. Preferred formats for graphics and artwork are TIFF (tagged image file format) and EPS (Encapsulated PostScript). John Wiley & Sons, Inc. journal pages are now produced completely electronically. Please see our Graphics FAQ for more information.

In preparing illustrations, contrast is important. Use dark black ink on high quality, smooth, opaque white paper. Ordinary white bond paper works well. Avoid tracing paper or textured "artist" papers.

Illustrations must fit a one- or two-column format on the journal page: For efficient use of journal space, single column illustrations are preferred.

 

Single (preferred)

Double

Minimum Width

 

9 cm (3.5 in)

Maximum Width

8 cm (3.125 in)

16.5 cm (6.5 in)

Maximum Depth

23 cm (9 in)

23 cm (9 in)

For best results, submit illustrations in the actual size at which they should appear in the journal. Original illustrations which do not need to be reduced to fit a single or double column will yield the best quality. Lettering should be no smaller than 6 points. (Helvetica type works well for lettering.) Lines should be no thinner than 0.5 point. Lettering and lines should be of uniform density. If you must submit artwork that must be reduced, use larger lettering and thicker lines so that, when reduced, the artwork meets the above-mentioned parameters. Avoid using complex textures and shading to achieve a three-dimensional effect. To show a pattern, choose a simple cross-hatch design.

Color . All color figures will be reproduced in full color in the online edition of the journal at no cost to the authors. Authors are encouraged to submit color illustrations that highlight the text and convey essential scientific information. For best reproduction, bright, clear colors should be used. Dark colors against a dark background do not reproduce well; please place your color images against a white background whenever possible. Please email jpsprod@wiley.com for further information.

Chemical Structures . Structures should be produced with the use of a drawing program such as ChemDraw. Authors using the current versions of ChemDraw, ChemIntosh, and ChemWindows will find the necessary parameters incorporated into these programs ("JOC Document" under the Windows menus for ChemDraw and "Reduce 60% for JOC Style" under the Options menu for ChemIntosh/ChemWindows). In ChemDraw version 4.5, files should be saved in TIFF format to allow use of electronic files in production (see journal home page "Information for Authors" for further guidelines).

(r) Nomenclature. It is the responsibility of the authors to provide correct nomenclature. All nomenclature must be consistent and unambiguous and should conform with current American usage. Insofar as possible, authors should use systematic names similar to those used by Chemical Abstracts Service, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, and the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

The chemical names for drugs should be used. If the terminology is unwieldy, nonproprietary names of drugs may be used throughout the manuscript after the first mention and identification. Formally adopted nonproprietary names listed in United States Adopted Names(USAN) should be used. In cases in which a name has not been assigned by USAN, the International Nonproprietary Names (INN) , approved by the World Health Organization, should be used. Trade names and laboratory codes should not be used except as additional information.

(s) Analyses. Adequate evidence to establish identity and purity should be provided for new compounds. When possible, this should include elemental analysis. The purity of compounds used for biological testing should be stated with a description of the method used to evaluate it.

(t) Hazardous Materials. All hazardous chemicals should be clearly identified as such. Precautions for handling dangerous materials or for performing hazardous procedures should be explicitly stated and referenced.

5. Proofs and Reprints. Proofs are sent to the author who submitted the papers. Authors are directed via email to download proofs from Wiley Author Services. Proofs should be verified against the manuscript and appropriate corrections made. Substantial changes in a manuscript after type has been set require editorial approval and in some cases may be cause for re-reviewing. An order form for reprints will be sent with the proofs. Please return the reprint order form, along with a purchase order or check, to John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Reprints will be shipped within 2 weeks after the printed journal date.

6. Publication Online. Articles accepted for publication in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences will be posted in Early View and then into the Online version of the journal (www.wileyonlinelibrary.com) as soon as author corrections to proofs are received and incorporated. This can occur anywhere from 2 to 6 weeks well in advance of the cover date of the printed issue. Authors should take this into account when planning their intellectual and patent activities related to an article. The actual date on which the article is posted online is recorded in a separate line at the bottom of the first page of the article in the printed issue.

7. Corrections. If errors of consequence are found in the published paper, a correction of the error should be sent by the author to the Editor-in-Chief for publication in the journal’s Errata Section.

8. Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTA) are located in Wiley Author Services. You will be notified by email after acceptance on how to access and submit your CTA for the Journal.

9. Confirmation of manuscript content must accompany initial submission. Manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences should contain significant, unpublished and original data not being considered simultaneously for publication elsewhere. All authors should be aware of and in agreement with the submission of this manuscript and share responsibility for its content. The manuscript should provide full and appropriate credit to those who contributed to the underlying hypothesis and the generation and interpretation of the experimental data. Related research in the field should be acknowledged in the manuscript through appropriate literature citations. Manuscripts should be devoid of any forms of plagiarism with respect to ideas, data, words, graphic materials or other forms of communication. All authors should be aware that this manuscript will be checked for plagiarism using CrossCheck anti-plagiarism software.

10. Scientific Misconduct Issues. An alleged violation of any of these basic rules of scientific ethics will be investigated confidentially in accord with the procedures set forth in the American Medical Association Manual of Style: A guide for Authors and Editors (10th Edition). If the violations are deemed to be sufficiently serious, the Editor-in-Chief will request that the authors provide a written explanation. If the authors do not provide an explanation or the explanation is unsatisfactory, such that the Journal's Editorial Team believes that the evidence clearly shows that scientific misconduct did occur, the Editor-in-Chief would promptly reject the manuscript or proceed to retract a published manuscript. In addition, the Editor-in-Chief reserves the right to notify the authors's institution for the violation of the Journal's scientific ethics policy. The Editor-in-Chief also reserves the option to request the author's institution initate a formal investigation into the alleged violation of scientific ethics and to report back to the Journal in a timely manner. If the formal institutional investigation confirms scientific misconduct, the Editor-in-Chief will promptly reject a pending manuscript or proceed to retract a published manuscript. Further, JPharmSciTMEditorial Team reserves the right to impose punitive actions (e.g. ban on publishing in the Journal) on authors proven to have violated any of the basic rules of scientific ethics.

11. Conflicts of Interest Guidelines: Authors. Authors should acknowledge all sources of funding used to generate the research results described in a manuscript submitted to the journal. This includes government, corporate, foundation, private or institutional funding. Authors should also disclose in their submitted manuscript any personal financial or non-financial interests that, based on their knowledge, might be affected by the publication of the results contained in the authors' manuscript. If authors have no financial or non-financial interests that represent conflicts of interest, they should inform the Editor-in-Chief in writing in the manuscript submission letter. If authors have financial or non-financial interests that represent potential conflicts of interest, they should disclose these conflicts in a footnote or in the acknowledgement section of the manuscript. In the process of selecting "preferred reviewers" for their manuscripts, authors should avoid suggesting individuals with whom they have personal or professional relationships that might bias their judgment of the manuscript's scientific merits.

12. Conflicts of Interest Guidelines: Reviewers. Reviewers should not evaluate a manuscript authored or co-authored by a person with whom the reviewer has personal or professional relationships that might bias their judgment of the manuscript's scientific merits. Reviewers should be sensitive to the appearance of potential conflicts of interest when the content of the manuscript relates directly to the reviewer's published or unpublished research. If in doubt, the reviewer should immediately notify the appropirate Editor and seek their advice on whether to proceed with the review. Reviewers should also be sensitive to the appearance of potential conflict of interest when the manuscript describes results from experiments using patented technologies, which are competitive with patented technologies invented by the reviewer or the reviewer's employer.

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