Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 54 Issue 5

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

(P)Review

Reviews in Angewandte Chemie, written by leading experts, summarize the important results of recent research on topical subjects in all branches of chemistry, point to unresolved problems, and discuss possible developments. Although review articles are generally written upon invitation of the editor, unsolicited manuscripts are also welcome provided they are in keeping with the character of the journal.

Index of Reviews: 1962–1969   1970–1979   1980–1989   1990–1999   2000–2009 2010–now   Nobel lectures

EarlyView

Bioinspired Super-Wettability from Fundamental Research to Practical Applications

Dr. Liping Wen, Dr. Ye Tian, Prof. Lei Jiang

Bioinspired Super-Wettability from Fundamental Research to Practical Applications

Wet, wet, wet: Surfaces with super-wettability, including three-dimensional, two-dimensional, and one-dimensional materials surfaces can be prepared. By combining different super-wettability properties, novel functional solid/liquid interfacial systems can be generated and integrated into devices for tackling many different problems.

Synthetic Membranes for Water Purification: Status and Future

Prof. Anthony G. Fane, Prof. Rong Wang, Prof. Matthew X. Hu

Synthetic Membranes for Water Purification: Status and Future

Membrane technology offers the best options to “drought proof” mankind on an increasingly thirsty planet by purifying seawater or used water. The driving forces for development of membranes for water production are described in this Review. An update is provided for developments in the various preparation techniques for the range of membrane types.

Organic Synthesis: March of the Machines

Prof. Steven V. Ley, Daniel E. Fitzpatrick, Dr. Richard. J. Ingham, Dr. Rebecca M. Myers

Organic Synthesis: March of the Machines

Transforming chemistry: New technologies and machines have found use as methods for changing the way we work, addressing the resource-based issues encountered in research laboratories by enabling chemists to adopt a more holistic systems approach in their work. This Review focuses on the concepts, procedures, and methods that have far-reaching implications in the chemistry world.

Perspectives in Chemistry—Aspects of Adaptive Chemistry and Materials

Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn

Perspectives in Chemistry—Aspects of Adaptive Chemistry and Materials

Chemistry, pure and applied, is a science and an industry. By its power over the expressions of matter, it also displays the creativity of art. The field of chemistry is the universe of all possible entities and transformations of molecular matter, of which those actually realized in nature represent just one world among all the worlds that await to be created at the hand of the chemist.

Biologically Inspired Dynamic Material Systems

Prof. André R. Studart

Biologically Inspired Dynamic Material Systems

Dynamic material systems have been created to replicate the interactivity and adaptive response of hierarchical biological systems. Selected examples of bio-inspired hairlike sensors, shape-changing objects, and interactive microcompartments are reviewed to showcase the increasing level of complexity and the dynamic functionalities that can be achieved by using top-down fabrication technologies and bottom-up assembly approaches.

Thermodynamics versus Kinetics in Nanosynthesis

Yawen Wang, Jiating He, Cuicui Liu, Wen Han Chong, Prof. Hongyu Chen

Thermodynamics versus Kinetics in Nanosynthesis

Understanding starts with distinction: Distinguishing between the thermodynamically and kinetically controlled scenarios is of critical importance when analyzing the complex phenomena in nanosynthesis, such as the growth of nanoparticles, their aggregation, and the shape evolution of polymer nanostructures. The processes are examined in detail in this Review and the mechanistic proposals are categorized in the common framework of thermodynamics and kinetics.

Functional Materials from Cellulose-Derived Liquid-Crystal Templates

Dr. Michael Giese, Dr. Lina K. Blusch, Dr. Mostofa K. Khan, Prof. Mark J. MacLachlan

Functional Materials from Cellulose-Derived Liquid-Crystal Templates

Out of the woods: Novel mesoporous and nanostructured materials can be generated by templating approaches based on cellulose-based liquid crystals derived from trees. This Review focuses on materials templated by cellulose nanocrystals, since their chiral nematic order allows their use in various optical applications such as optical filters, sensors, and optoelectronics.

Terpenoid Biosynthesis Off the Beaten Track: Unconventional Cyclases and their Impact on Biomimetic Synthesis

Martin Baunach, Jakob Franke, Prof. Dr. Christian Hertweck

Terpenoid Biosynthesis Off the Beaten Track: Unconventional Cyclases and their Impact on Biomimetic Synthesis

Terpene and terpenoid cyclizations are counted among the most complex chemical reactions occurring in nature and contribute crucially to the tremendous structural diversity of this largest family of natural products. This Review outlines novel terpenoid cyclases (TCs) beyond typical class I and II TCs, and showcases how their intriguing reaction mechanisms can inspire synthetic chemistry.

Oil/Water Separation with Selective Superantiwetting/Superwetting Surface Materials

Dr. Zonglin Chu, Prof. Dr. Yujun Feng, Prof. Dr. Stefan Seeger

Oil/Water Separation with Selective Superantiwetting/Superwetting Surface Materials

Stringent segregation: Superhydrophobic/superoleophilic surfaces and underwater superoleophobic surfaces have been successfully designed, fabricated, and employed in the separation of oil/water-free mixtures and emulsions on the basis of their selective superantiwetting/superwetting properties towards water and oil. Progress, remaining problems, and future challenges in this field are discussed in this Review.

Molecular Rare-Earth-Metal Hydrides in Non-Cyclopentadienyl Environments

Dr. Waldemar Fegler, Dr. Ajay Venugopal, Dr. Mathias Kramer, Prof. Dr. Jun Okuda

Molecular Rare-Earth-Metal Hydrides in Non-Cyclopentadienyl Environments

Beyond Cp: Molecular hydrides of rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as models of solid-state interstitial hydrides. This Review provides an overview of rare-earth-metal hydride complexes(without cyclopentadienyl ligands), with emphasis on the structural motifs and the effect of cationic charges on reactivity.

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