Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 41

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

(P)Review

Reviews in Angewandte Chemie, written by leading experts, summarize the important results of recent research on topical subjects in all branches of chemistry, point to unresolved problems, and discuss possible developments. Although review articles are generally written upon invitation of the editor, unsolicited manuscripts are also welcome provided they are in keeping with the character of the journal.

Index of Reviews: 1962–1969   1970–1979   1980–1989   1990–1999   2000–2009 2010–now   Nobel lectures

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Selective Carbon–Carbon Bond Cleavage for the Stereoselective Synthesis of Acyclic Systems

Prof. Dr. Ilan Marek, Dr. Ahmad Masarwa, Dr. Pierre-Olivier Delaye, Dr. Markus Leibeling

Selective Carbon–Carbon Bond Cleavage for the Stereoselective Synthesis of Acyclic Systems

Open, sesame! The creation of new bonds has dominated the field of organic synthesis; however, selective C[BOND]C cleavage (see scheme) is an important alternative for the construction of interesting molecular frameworks. This Review examines approaches to the synthesis of challenging acyclic molecular skeletons by the regio-, diastereo-, or enantioselective cleavage of carbon–carbon bonds, with a focus on the ring opening of small rings.

Synthesis of Extended π-Systems through C–H Activation

Prof. Dr. Yasutomo Segawa, Takehisa Maekawa, Prof. Dr. Kenichiro Itami

Synthesis of Extended π-Systems through C–H Activation

By no means π in the sky! The activation of aromatic C[BOND]H bonds by a transition metal catalyst has received significant attention in the synthetic chemistry community. In recent years, rapid and site-selective extension of π-electron systems by C–H activation has emerged as an ideal methodology for preparing conjugated organic materials. This Review focuses on recently developments in this area directed toward new optoelectronic materials.

Advances in Anion Supramolecular Chemistry: From Recognition to Chemical Applications

Dr. Nicholas H. Evans, Prof. Paul D. Beer

Advances in Anion Supramolecular Chemistry: From Recognition to Chemical Applications

Since the start of this millennium, anion supramolecular chemistry has evolved substantially beyond the chemistry of anion receptors. Alongside the research that continues on the binding and sensing of anions, large strides have been made in areas which have previously been underdeveloped, such as the use of anions as templates and for membrane transportation, and importantly in chemical applications including catalysis, ion extraction, and responsive molecular systems.

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Niessner

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

What is soot? Soot nanoparticles produced by engines are a threat to human health. The comprehensive characterization of soot will be essential to meet future low-emission standards. This Review describes the many properties of soot nanoparticles and the possibilities to characterize them, from analysis of its morphology and biological reactivity, to its simple combustion, photoacoustic spectroscopy, and Raman scattering.

Reactivity and Stability of Glucosinolates and their Breakdown Products in Foods

Dr. Franziska S. Hanschen, Dr. Evelyn Lamy, Prof. Dr. Monika Schreiner, Prof. Dr. Sascha Rohn

Reactivity and Stability of Glucosinolates and their Breakdown Products in Foods

Vegetables such as broccoli contain a variety of cancer-preventing agents, among them glucosinolates. These sulfur-containing compounds are precursors to a variety of enzymatically or chemically formed breakdown products that affect the quality of food with regard to nutritional value, flavor, and beneficial health effects. This review provides an overview over the reactivity of glucosinolates and their breakdown products.

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Dr. Jens Rieger, Dr. Matthias Kellermeier, Dr. Luc Nicoleau

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Intermediate nanostructures occurring during crystallization reactions play an important role in understanding and controlling the formation of particles and hybrid materials. The use of polymers allows the range of achievable properties to be broadened through their specific effects at the nanoscale—as is exemplified in this Review with calcium carbonate, zinc oxide, and cementitious systems.

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Prof. James Edward Rothman

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Cells contain small membrane-enclosed vesicles which transport many kinds of cargo between the compartments of the cell. The result is a choreographed program of secretory, biosynthetic and endocytic protein traffic that serves the cell’s internal physiologic needs.

The Hydrophobic Effect Revisited—Studies with Supramolecular Complexes Imply High-Energy Water as a Noncovalent Driving Force

Dr. Frank Biedermann, Prof. Dr. Werner M. Nau, Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Schneider

The Hydrophobic Effect Revisited—Studies with Supramolecular Complexes Imply High-Energy Water as a Noncovalent Driving Force

Overcoming a phobia: Hydrophobic effects are traditionally described by the association of two lipophilic molecules, which then need less water molecules for solvation than two separate solutes, thus leading to either entropy or enthalpy gain. Investigations with supramolecular complexes have shown that another mechanism based on the replacement of hydrogen-bond-deficient high-energy water molecules in cavities can play a decisive role.

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