Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 44

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

(P)Review

Reviews in Angewandte Chemie, written by leading experts, summarize the important results of recent research on topical subjects in all branches of chemistry, point to unresolved problems, and discuss possible developments. Although review articles are generally written upon invitation of the editor, unsolicited manuscripts are also welcome provided they are in keeping with the character of the journal.

Index of Reviews: 1962–1969   1970–1979   1980–1989   1990–1999   2000–2009 2010–now   Nobel lectures

EarlyView

The Molecular Machinery of Neurotransmitter Release (Nobel Lecture)

Prof. Thomas C. Südhof

The Molecular Machinery of Neurotransmitter Release (Nobel Lecture)

The most important property of synaptic transmission is its speed, which is crucial for the overall workings of the brain. In his Nobel Lecture, T. C. Südhof explains how the synaptic vesicle and the plasma membrane undergo rapid fusion during neurotransmitter release and how this process is spatially organized, such that opening of Ca2+-channels allows rapid translation of the entering Ca2+ signal into a fusion event.

Microfluidic Isolation of Nucleic Acids

Sarah J. Reinholt, Prof. Antje J. Baeumner

Microfluidic Isolation of Nucleic Acids

It′s a small world: Many nucleic acid isolation techniques have been miniaturized and integrated into microfluidic devices, each having their own advantages and disadvantages, as well as (potential) applications. The techniques presented include using silica-based surfaces, functionalized paramagnetic beads, oligonucleotide-modified polymer surfaces, pH-dependent charged surfaces, and aluminum oxide membranes.

Nanosafety Research—Are We on the Right Track?

Prof. Dr. Harald F. Krug

Nanosafety Research—Are We on the Right Track?

A question of safety: This Review discusses how far the human toxicological evaluation of synthetic nanomaterials has come, for which over 10 000 publications have appeared since 2000. Four core themes have been analyzed: the uptake of nanomaterials by the three main pathways of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and skin as well as the assessment of the methods for lung exposure studies.

Energy Storage Materials Synthesized from Ionic Liquids

Dr. Gebrekidan Gebresilassie Eshetu, Prof. Dr. Michel Armand, Prof. Dr. Bruno Scrosati, Prof. Dr. Stefano Passerini

Energy Storage Materials Synthesized from Ionic Liquids

Functional ionic liquids (ILs) are appealing eco-friendly solvents for the synthesis of tailor-made inorganic compounds of use in energy storage devices. Their peculiar properties, such as low volatility, wide liquidus range, high thermal stability, and large electrochemical window, make them suitable as functional advanced materials, media for materials production, and components for preparing highly engineered functional products.

Engineered Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy

Dr. Tianmeng Sun, Dr. Yu Shrike Zhang, Bo Pang, Dr. Dong Choon Hyun, Miaoxin Yang, Prof. Younan Xia

Engineered Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy

On the way to nanomedicine: Considerable advances in the development of nanoparticles for cancer therapy have been made in recent years. Nanoparticle-based drug-delivery systems offer advantages with regard to multidrug resistance, systemic delivery, and clearance, and enable for example specific tumor targeting and controlled release of therapeutic agents.

Constraining Cyclic Peptides To Mimic Protein Structure Motifs

Dr. Timothy A. Hill, Dr. Nicholas E. Shepherd, Dr. Frederik Diness, Prof. Dr. David P. Fairlie

Constraining Cyclic Peptides To Mimic Protein Structure Motifs

Short peptides can be constrained by cyclization to recreate key folded elements of protein structure, like β-strands and β-sheets, α-helices, and turn motifs. Coupled with internal molecular constraints, cyclization has led to many protease-resistant, potent and target-selective, biologically active compounds for use in biology and medicine.

Selective Carbon–Carbon Bond Cleavage for the Stereoselective Synthesis of Acyclic Systems

Prof. Dr. Ilan Marek, Dr. Ahmad Masarwa, Dr. Pierre-Olivier Delaye, Dr. Markus Leibeling

Selective Carbon–Carbon Bond Cleavage for the Stereoselective Synthesis of Acyclic Systems

Open, sesame! The creation of new bonds has dominated the field of organic synthesis; however, selective C[BOND]C cleavage (see scheme) is an important alternative for the construction of interesting molecular frameworks. This Review examines approaches to the synthesis of challenging acyclic molecular skeletons by the regio-, diastereo-, or enantioselective cleavage of carbon–carbon bonds, with a focus on the ring opening of small rings.

Synthesis of Extended π-Systems through C–H Activation

Prof. Dr. Yasutomo Segawa, Takehisa Maekawa, Prof. Dr. Kenichiro Itami

Synthesis of Extended π-Systems through C–H Activation

By no means π in the sky! The activation of aromatic C[BOND]H bonds by a transition metal catalyst has received significant attention in the synthetic chemistry community. In recent years, rapid and site-selective extension of π-electron systems by C–H activation has emerged as an ideal methodology for preparing conjugated organic materials. This Review focuses on recently developments in this area directed toward new optoelectronic materials.

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Niessner

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

What is soot? Soot nanoparticles produced by engines are a threat to human health. The comprehensive characterization of soot will be essential to meet future low-emission standards. This Review describes the many properties of soot nanoparticles and the possibilities to characterize them, from analysis of its morphology and biological reactivity, to its simple combustion, photoacoustic spectroscopy, and Raman scattering.

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Dr. Jens Rieger, Dr. Matthias Kellermeier, Dr. Luc Nicoleau

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Intermediate nanostructures occurring during crystallization reactions play an important role in understanding and controlling the formation of particles and hybrid materials. The use of polymers allows the range of achievable properties to be broadened through their specific effects at the nanoscale—as is exemplified in this Review with calcium carbonate, zinc oxide, and cementitious systems.

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Prof. James Edward Rothman

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Cells contain small membrane-enclosed vesicles which transport many kinds of cargo between the compartments of the cell. The result is a choreographed program of secretory, biosynthetic and endocytic protein traffic that serves the cell’s internal physiologic needs.

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