Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 53 Issue 39

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

(P)Review

Reviews in Angewandte Chemie, written by leading experts, summarize the important results of recent research on topical subjects in all branches of chemistry, point to unresolved problems, and discuss possible developments. Although review articles are generally written upon invitation of the editor, unsolicited manuscripts are also welcome provided they are in keeping with the character of the journal.

Index of Reviews: 1962–1969   1970–1979   1980–1989   1990–1999   2000–2009 2010–now   Nobel lectures

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Advances in Anion Supramolecular Chemistry: From Recognition to Chemical Applications

Dr. Nicholas H. Evans, Prof. Paul D. Beer

Advances in Anion Supramolecular Chemistry: From Recognition to Chemical Applications

Since the start of this millennium, anion supramolecular chemistry has evolved substantially beyond the chemistry of anion receptors. Alongside the research that continues on the binding and sensing of anions, large strides have been made in areas which have previously been underdeveloped, such as the use of anions as templates and for membrane transportation, and importantly in chemical applications including catalysis, ion extraction, and responsive molecular systems.

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Niessner

The Many Faces of Soot: Characterization of Soot Nanoparticles Produced by Engines

What is soot? Soot nanoparticles produced by engines are a threat to human health. The comprehensive characterization of soot will be essential to meet future low-emission standards. This Review describes the many properties of soot nanoparticles and the possibilities to characterize them, from analysis of its morphology and biological reactivity, to its simple combustion, photoacoustic spectroscopy, and Raman scattering.

Reactivity and Stability of Glucosinolates and their Breakdown Products in Foods

Dr. Franziska S. Hanschen, Dr. Evelyn Lamy, Prof. Dr. Monika Schreiner, Prof. Dr. Sascha Rohn

Reactivity and Stability of Glucosinolates and their Breakdown Products in Foods

Vegetables such as broccoli contain a variety of cancer-preventing agents, among them glucosinolates. These sulfur-containing compounds are precursors to a variety of enzymatically or chemically formed breakdown products that affect the quality of food with regard to nutritional value, flavor, and beneficial health effects. This review provides an overview over the reactivity of glucosinolates and their breakdown products.

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Dr. Jens Rieger, Dr. Matthias Kellermeier, Dr. Luc Nicoleau

Formation of Nanoparticles and Nanostructures—An Industrial Perspective on CaCO3, Cement, and Polymers

Intermediate nanostructures occurring during crystallization reactions play an important role in understanding and controlling the formation of particles and hybrid materials. The use of polymers allows the range of achievable properties to be broadened through their specific effects at the nanoscale—as is exemplified in this Review with calcium carbonate, zinc oxide, and cementitious systems.

Enzymatic Degradation of (Ligno)cellulose

Prof. Dr. Uwe Bornscheuer, Prof. Dr. Klaus Buchholz, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Seibel

Enzymatic Degradation of (Ligno)cellulose

A stubborn raw material: The conversion of cellulosic biomass into low-price biofuels and high-value-added chemicals is a very challenging goal. This Review addresses the development of the enzymatic catalytic degradation of (ligno)cellulose (see picture), including achievements in the areas of chemical-reaction engineering, structural biochemistry, and catalyst design.

Three-Dimensional Characterization of Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and their Assemblies by Electron Tomography

Prof. Dr. Sara Bals, Dr. Bart Goris, Prof. Dr. Luis M. Liz-Marzán, Prof. Dr. Gustaaf Van Tendeloo

Three-Dimensional Characterization of Noble-Metal Nanoparticles and their Assemblies by Electron Tomography

A sight for small eyes: In 3D investigations of metal nanoparticles and their assemblies, electron tomography has become a versatile tool to understand the connection between the properties and structure or composition of nanomaterials. The different steps of an electron tomography experiment are discussed and how quantitative 3D information can be obtained even at the atomic scale is shown.

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Prof. James Edward Rothman

The Principle of Membrane Fusion in the Cell (Nobel Lecture)

Cells contain small membrane-enclosed vesicles which transport many kinds of cargo between the compartments of the cell. The result is a choreographed program of secretory, biosynthetic and endocytic protein traffic that serves the cell’s internal physiologic needs.

The Chemistry and Biology of Theta Defensins

Anne C. Conibear, Prof. David J. Craik

The Chemistry and Biology of Theta Defensins

Climbing up the ladder: Theta defensins are the only known cyclic backbone peptides from mammals and are characterized by the cyclic cystine ladder motif. They have promising applications as antimicrobials and peptide drug scaffolds, but little is known about their distribution in primate species or biosynthesis from two gene products. The Review discusses the progress in understanding the chemistry and biology of theta defensins and highlights remaining challenges and questions.

The Hydrophobic Effect Revisited—Studies with Supramolecular Complexes Imply High-Energy Water as a Noncovalent Driving Force

Dr. Frank Biedermann, Prof. Dr. Werner M. Nau, Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Schneider

The Hydrophobic Effect Revisited—Studies with Supramolecular Complexes Imply High-Energy Water as a Noncovalent Driving Force

Overcoming a phobia: Hydrophobic effects are traditionally described by the association of two lipophilic molecules, which then need less water molecules for solvation than two separate solutes, thus leading to either entropy or enthalpy gain. Investigations with supramolecular complexes have shown that another mechanism based on the replacement of hydrogen-bond-deficient high-energy water molecules in cavities can play a decisive role.

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