Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 54 Issue 10

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

(P)Review

Reviews in Angewandte Chemie, written by leading experts, summarize the important results of recent research on topical subjects in all branches of chemistry, point to unresolved problems, and discuss possible developments. Although review articles are generally written upon invitation of the editor, unsolicited manuscripts are also welcome provided they are in keeping with the character of the journal.

Index of Reviews: 1962–1969   1970–1979   1980–1989   1990–1999   2000–2009 2010–now   Nobel lectures

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Enantioselective Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions

Dr. Richard Brimioulle, M. Sc. Dominik Lenhart, M. Sc. Mark M. Maturi, Prof. Dr. Thorsten Bach

Enantioselective Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions

All good things come in threes: With catalysis, light, and chirality, three of the most important scientific phenomena merge in the field of the enantioselective catalysis of photochemical reactions. This Review introduces the main concepts and provides an overview of the key findings in this area.

Heterogeneous Catalysis

Prof. Dr. Robert Schlögl

Heterogeneous Catalysis

Filling the gaps: The understanding of heterogeneous catalysis is built on a standard model of interface catalysis that was developed from surface physics and theory. This model has significant gaps with regards to transferring knowledge yielded to high-performance catalysts, and approaches to fill these gaps are proposed in this Review.

Advanced Biotechnology: Metabolically Engineered Cells for the Bio-Based Production of Chemicals and Fuels, Materials, and Health-Care Products

Dr. Judith Becker, Prof. Dr. Christoph Wittmann

Advanced Biotechnology: Metabolically Engineered Cells for the Bio-Based Production of Chemicals and Fuels, Materials, and Health-Care Products

From cells to cell factories: Modern biotechnology combines systems metabolic and genetic engineering to enable microbes to produce natural value-added products. The picture illustrates the upgrade of the complex cellular metabolism into an industrial cell factory.

Multipore Zeolites: Synthesis and Catalytic Applications

Dr. Manuel Moliner, Dr. Cristina Martínez, Prof. Avelino Corma 

Multipore Zeolites: Synthesis and Catalytic Applications

Molecular traffic control: Multipore zeolites contain channels of different sizes. They can be prepared in a planned manner and their channel structure offers advantages in shape- and size-selective catalysis. The different rates molecules diffuse through the different channels is termed molecular traffic control.

The Emerging Chemistry of Sodium Ion Batteries for Electrochemical Energy Storage

Dr. Dipan Kundu, Elahe Talaie, Dr. Victor Duffort, Prof. Linda F. Nazar

The Emerging Chemistry of Sodium Ion Batteries for Electrochemical Energy Storage

Below lithium: Concerns over the future cost and sustainability of resources of lithium has led to a global trend to develop low-cost sodium-ion batteries. Central to this has been the fast-developing field of non-aqueous batteries that could employ a plethora of materials for the positive and negative electrodes, and electrolytes. Apart from sustainability, they offer structural and electrochemical benefits compared to their Li analogues.

Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

Dr. Hans Renata, Dr. Z. Jane Wang, Prof. Dr. Frances H. Arnold

Expanding the Enzyme Universe: Accessing Non-Natural Reactions by Mechanism-Guided Directed Evolution

Exploiting hidden talents: The engineering of enzymes to catalyze reactions not known in nature will expand the range of transformations that can be promoted by biocatalysis. This Review presents a common pathway by which new enzyme activities evolve in nature and examples of the use of a similar approach to create enzymes for non-natural reactions (see picture).

Molecular Recognition in Chemical and Biological Systems

Dipl.-Chem. Elke Persch, Dipl.-Chem. Oliver Dumele, Prof. Dr. François Diederich

Molecular Recognition in Chemical and Biological Systems

Both are required: Chemical model systems and the study of biological receptors are both required to understand molecular recognition processes. The identification and quantification of noncovalent interactions and deciphering the role of water are key elements for structure-based drug design. Several case studies are presented in which weak intermolecular interactions were applied to innovative ligand design and optimization.

Bioinspired Super-Wettability from Fundamental Research to Practical Applications

Dr. Liping Wen, Dr. Ye Tian, Prof. Lei Jiang

Bioinspired Super-Wettability from Fundamental Research to Practical Applications

Wet, wet, wet: Surfaces with super-wettability, including three-dimensional, two-dimensional, and one-dimensional materials surfaces can be prepared. By combining different super-wettability properties, novel functional solid/liquid interfacial systems can be generated and integrated into devices for tackling many different problems.

Synthetic Membranes for Water Purification: Status and Future

Prof. Anthony G. Fane, Prof. Rong Wang, Prof. Matthew X. Hu

Synthetic Membranes for Water Purification: Status and Future

Membrane technology offers the best options to “drought proof” mankind on an increasingly thirsty planet by purifying seawater or used water. The driving forces for development of membranes for water production are described in this Review. An update is provided for developments in the various preparation techniques for the range of membrane types.

Organic Synthesis: March of the Machines

Prof. Steven V. Ley, Daniel E. Fitzpatrick, Dr. Richard. J. Ingham, Dr. Rebecca M. Myers

Organic Synthesis: March of the Machines

Transforming chemistry: New technologies and machines have found use as methods for changing the way we work, addressing the resource-based issues encountered in research laboratories by enabling chemists to adopt a more holistic systems approach in their work. This Review focuses on the concepts, procedures, and methods that have far-reaching implications in the chemistry world.

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