Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 56 Issue 50

Editor: Neville Compton; Editor Emeritus: Peter Gölitz

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPhotoChem, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

Author Profiles

Authors presented on this page have recently published their 10th, 25th, 50th, or 100th article since 2000 in Angewandte Chemie. Find out interesting facts and trivia about them...

Archive: 2011 | 2010 | 2009.

Hans-Günther (Hagga) Schmalz

“I am waiting for the day when someone will discover an implantable memory chip. My science “heroes” are Richard Willstätter and Vladimir Prelog ...” This and more about Hans-Günther (Hagga) Schmalz can be found on page 10038.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 52, 10038

J. Antoine Baceiredo

“My favorite subject at school was physics. When I was eighteen I wanted to be a scientist ...” This and more about J. Antoine Baceiredo can be found on page 9810.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 51, 9810

Laurent Maron

“When I was eighteen I wanted to be an engineer. When I wake up I wake up my son and my daughter ...” This and more about Laurent Maron can be found on page 9562.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 50, 9562

François P. Gabbaï

“When I wake up I go to our kitchen and prepare the lunches of my daughters. The biggest problem that scientists face is the increasing pressure put on our planet by humanity ...” This and more about François P. Gabbaï can be found on page 9318.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 49, 9318

Hsiang-Rong Tseng

“My favorite subjects at school were chemistry and physics. When I wake up I check my e-mails ...” This and more about Hsiang-Rong Tseng can be found on page 9036.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 48, 9036

Xiaoming Feng

“My favorite subject at school was physics. When I wake up I wish I could fall asleep again ...” This and more about Xiaoming Feng can be found on page 8789.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 47, 8789

Thomas M. Klapötke

“My favorite subject at school was chemistry. The most significant advance of the last 100 years has been rocket propulsion ...” This and more about Thomas M. Klapötke can be found on page 8561.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 46, 8561

Milko E. van der Boom

“The part of my job which I enjoy the most is working with motivated and talented students. I am waiting for the day when someone will discover a cure for major diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer ...” This and more about Milko E. van der Boom can be found on page 8301.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 45, 8301

Helmut Werner

“My favorite subject at school was mathematics. My first experiment which I did together with a friend at the age of 11 was an oxyhydrogen gas explosion ...” This and more about Helmut Werner can be found on page 8070.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 44, 8070-8072

Neil Branda

“When I was eighteen I wanted to be older and wiser. In ten years time I will be ten years older but probably no wiser ...” This and more about Neil Branda can be found on page 7840.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 43, 7840

Bernhard Kräutler

“Three qualities that make a good scientist are curiosity, creativity, and a very critical mind. My favorite subjects at school were art and natural sciences ...” This and more about Bernhard Kräutler can be found on page 7620.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 42, 7620

Takuzo Aida

“If I were not a scientist, I would be an architect or a designer. My favorite subject at school was art because art provides essentially unlimited possibilities based on one's imagination ...” This and more about Takuzo Aida can be found on page 7380.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 41, 7380-7382

Otto S. Wolfbeis

“My favorite subject at school was music. The biggest challenge facing scientists is ... to understand the function of the brain. ...” This and more about Otto S. Wolfbeis can be found on page 7160.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 40, 7160-7161

Leroy (Lee) Cronin

“My ultimate goal is to assemble/discover artificial (inorganic) biology. When I was eighteen I wanted to be a fast jet pilot ...” This and more about Leroy (Lee) Cronin can be found on page 6930.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 39, 6930-6932

Ramón Martínez-Máñez

“My favorite subjects at school were scientific subjects such as chemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics. I also liked philosophy. The biggest problem that scientists face is financial support (and the time invested in getting it). ...” This and more about Ramón Martínez-Máñez can be found on page 6708.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 38, 6708

Albert Schenning

“The part of my job that I enjoy the most is to motivate, support, and educate young people. The biggest problem that scientists face is to show the importance and beauty of science. ...” This and more about Albert Schenning can be found on page 6482.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 37, 6482

José Barluenga

“If I could be anyone for a day, I would be Christopher Columbus at the time he reached America for the first time. If I were not scientist, I would be a veterinary surgeon ...” This and more about José Barluenga can be found on page 6250.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 36, 6250-6252

Carsten Schmuck

“My favorite subjects at school were mathematics, chemistry, and French. The three qualities that make a good scientist are curiosity, enthusiasm, and persistence ...” This and more about Carsten Schmuck can be found on page 6024.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 35, 6024

Thomas Braun

“The three qualities that make a good scientist are creativity, persistence, and knowledge. My favorite subject at school was chemistry, but also history ...” This and more about Thomas Braun can be found on page 5824.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 34, 5824

David O'Hagan

“When I was eighteen I wanted to o play football for Scotland. The greatest scientific advance of the last 50 years is the way biology is becoming a molecular science (chemistry) ...” This and more about David O'Hagan can be found on page 5604.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 33, 5604

Kim Renée Dunbar

„My favorite subjects at school were chemistry and mathematics. If I could have dinner with three famous scientists from history, they would be Marie Curie, Louis Pasteur, and Alfred Werner ...” This and more about Kim Renée Dunbar can be found on page 5408.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 32, 5408

Kazunori Kataoka

“In my opinion, the word “scientist” means an artist for the future. If I won the lottery I would buy a winery ...” This and more about Kazunori Kataoka can be found on page 5218.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 31, 5218

Roderich D. Süssmuth

“My favorite subjects at school were natural sciences, history, music lessons, and the theatre group. The biggest challenge facing scientists is solving social challenges with the achievements of scientific knowledge ...” This and more about Roderich D. Süssmuth can be found on page 5032.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 30, 5032

Ivan Huc

“My biggest motivation is curiosity. The secret of being a successful scientist is to constantly raise one's standards and creativity ...” This and more about Ivan Huc can be found on page 4704.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 28, 4704

Gerhard Erker

“When I was eighteen I wanted to be either a chemist or a paleontologist. My favorite piece of research is the development of stereochemistry ...” This and more about Gerhard Erker can be found on page 4536–4538.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 27, 4536-4538

Teresa Carlomagno

“My favorite subject at school was philosophy. The most exciting thing about my research is facing new challenges everyday ...” This and more about Teresa Carlomagno can be found on page 4162.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 25, 4162

Hagan Bayley

“When I wake up I drink coffee. If I could be anyone for a day, I would be Lewis Carroll. He worked just down the road from here. But, only for a day. The most significant scientific advance of the last 100 years has been the human genome sequence through a wonderful amalgamation of biology, chemistry, engineering, computer hardware and software, and management skills. Plus some adroit politics ...” This and more about Hagan Bayley can be found on page 4010.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 24, 4010

David Milstein

“The biggest problem that scientists face is funding and public recognition of the importance of basic research. If I could be anyone for a day, I would be the finance minister of our country. This would be a marvelous opportunity to be very generous towards the universities in our country ...” This and more about David Milstein can be found on page 3866.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 23, 3866

Lutz Ackermann

“The secret of being a successful scientist is curiosity and dedication. A good work day begins with exciting new experimental results ...” This and more about Lutz Ackermann can be found on page 3716.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 22, 3716

Tetsuro Majima

“When I was eighteen I wanted to be the first person to live on the moon. If I could be anyone for a day, I would be a scientist 1000 years from now ...” This and more about Tetsuro Majima can be found on page 3564.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 21, 3564

Takeshi Akasaka

“My most exciting discovery to date has been the functionalization of endohedral metallofullerenes. My biggest motivation is to realize that where there is a will, there is a way ...” This and more about Takeshi Akasaka can be found on page 3408.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 20, 3408

Didier Bourissou

“If I could be anyone for a day, I would be an orchestra conductor. A good work day begins with a strong espresso and an unexpected crystal structure of significant interest ...” This and more about Didier Bourissou can be found on page 3258.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 19, 3258

Pier Giorgio Cozzi

“I chose chemistry as a career because it is a nice combination of theory and practice. I would have liked to have discovered football! ...” This and more about Pier Giorgio Cozzi can be found on page 3110.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 18, 3110

Itamar Willner

“If I wasn't a scientist, I would be an art and antiquities researcher. The secret of being a successful scientist is to be creative and innovative, to work hard, and most importantly, to be lucky ...” This and more about Itamar Willner can be found on page 2968.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 17, 2968-2970

Dirk Trauner

“My favorite piece of research is the Fischer proof. A perfect combination of a rather specialized technical advance with brilliant reasoning. When I was eighteen I wanted to be an architect ...” This and more about Dirk Trauner can be found on page 2822.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 16, 2822

Carlos F. Barbas III

“My biggest inspiration is the life work of Paul Ehrlich. My favorite subject at school was science, of course ...” This and more about Carlos F. Barbas III can be found on page 2468.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 14, 2468

Lester Andrews

“The biggest problem that chemists face is increasing the signal to noise ratio. My favorite piece of research is our preparation of dialane in solid hydrogen ...” This and more about Lester Andrews can be found on page 2278.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 13, 2278

Horst Kunz

“My favorite piece of research is to simulate and elucidate processes of biological regulation through structurally specified models. The part of my job which I enjoy the most is that ideas can be proven by experiments ...” This and more about Horst Kunz can be found on page 2092.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 12, 2092-2094

Alexandre Alexakis

“My biggest motivation is curiosity. The most significant advance in chemistry in the last hundred years has been catalysis, any catalysis ...” This and more about Alexandre Alexakis can be found on page 1914.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 11, 1914

Pierre Braunstein

“My favorite subjects at school ranged from Latin to sciences, with an increasing emphasis on the latter. I chose chemistry as a career because I enjoyed the subject, its relevance to everyday life, and its versatility ...” This and more about Pierre Braunstein can be found on page 1718.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 10, 1718-1720

Thomas Wirth

“I chose chemistry as a career because I like to do experiments myself. Nowadays, this is unfortunately rarely the case. My biggest inspiration is a completely unexpected result from a seemingly straightforward experiment ...” This and more about Anthony Thomas Wirth can be found on page 1528.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 09, 1528

Norbert Krause

“The best advice I have ever been given is honesty is the best policy. The worst advice I have ever been given was to give up my academic career ...” This and more about Norbert Krause can be found on page 1354.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 08, 1354

Martin Kaupp

“In a nutshell, my research involves understanding how molecules work. The biggest challenge facing scientists is securing sufficient renewable energy resources. ...” This and more about Martin Kaupp can be found on page 1190.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 07, 1190

Simon Aldridge

“The best advice I have ever been given is “Hard work never killed anyone!” The worst advice I have ever been given was “Don't go to Oxford—you'll flounder.” ...” This and more about Simon Aldridge can be found on page 1008.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 06, 1008

Frank Glorius

“In a nutshell, my research involves the development of innovative and powerful catalytic methods for the improvement of organic synthesis. If I wasn't a scientist, I would be unhappy ...” This and more about Frank Glorius can be found on page 842.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 05, 842

Dawei Ma

“The most exciting thing about my research is observing unexpected but significantly important results. The biggest problem that scientists face is how to balance curiosity-driven research and applied research ...” This and more about Dawei Ma can be found on page 666.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 04, 666

Christian Limberg

“The secret of being a successful scientist is pertinacity, high frustration tolerance, and ingenuousness. If I could be anyone for a day, I would be Leonardo da Vinci ...” This and more about Christian Limberg can be found on page 484.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 03, 484

Luis Echegoyen

“I chose chemistry as a career because I could make things that did not exist. If I wasn't a scientist, I would be a writer ...” This and more about Luis Echegoyen can be found on page 248.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 02, 248

Anthony P. Davis

“The secret of being a successful scientist is to have co-workers who are better than you ever were. My favorite subject at school was chemistry ...” This and more about Anthony P. Davis can be found on page 26.

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2010, 49, No. 01, 26

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