Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Cover image for Vol. 54 Issue 28

Editor: Peter Gölitz, Deputy Editors: Neville Compton, Haymo Ross

Online ISSN: 1521-3773

Associated Title(s): Angewandte Chemie, Chemistry - A European Journal, Chemistry – An Asian Journal, ChemistryOpen, ChemPlusChem, Zeitschrift für Chemie

54_28/2015Cover Picture: The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 28/2015)

Glowing fungi were described by Aristotle as early as the fourth century B.C. In their Communication on page 8124 ff., I. V. Yampolsky, J. I. Gitelson, and co-workers unveil the structure of fungal luciferin, a compound that is responsible for fungal biolumescence.

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Also of Interest

Glowing fungi were described by Aristotle as early as the fourth century B.C. In their Communication on page 8124 ff., I. V. Yampolsky, J. I. Gitelson, and co-workers unveil the structure of fungal luciferin, a compound that is responsible for fungal biolumescence.

Cancer Diagnosticsfor001

A hypoxia-sensitive sensor for tracking cancer metastasis is reported by X. Q. Jiang et al. on page 8094 ff. After systemic administration of the sensor, cancer cells metastasizing to the lungs or to the lymph nodes are detected by whole-body optical imaging.


NO Electroreductionfor002

The crucial role of water in determining the mechanism of NO electroreduction to ammonia on Pt(111) surfaces is investigated by J. Greeley et al. in their Communication on page 8255 ff. Water facilitates proton transfer to adsorbed surface intermediates with very low kinetic barriers.


Porphyrinoidsfor003

M. Bröring et al. present the first free-base corrole radical in their Communication on page 8213 ff. Loss of an inner hydrogen atom from the air-stable, easy-to-handle porphyrinoid gives a planar molecule that can, for example, bind Zn2+.


54_28i/2015Inside Cover: Pim Kinase Inhibitors Evaluated with a Single-Molecule Engineered Nanopore Sensor (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 28/2015)

A nanopore-based label-free kinase inhibitor assay is described by H. Bayley et al. in their Communication on page 8154 ff. An α-hemolysin pore (white) in an artificial membrane binds kinase proteins (purple) through a modified subunit bearing a genetically fused peptide (orange). Binding of kinase molecules in the presence of nucleotides and inhibitors is observed in real-time by monitoring the flow of ionic current through the pore, and yields reliable inhibition constants for prospective drug molecules.

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54_28c/2015Inside Back Cover: Elucidation of Pathways for NO Electroreduction on Pt(111) from First Principles (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 28/2015)

The crucial role of water in determining the mechanism of NO electroreduction on single-crystal Pt(111) surfaces is revealed by first principles density functional theory calculations, as described by J. Greeley et al. in their Communication on page 8255 ff. Water facilitates proton transfer to adsorbed surface intermediates with very low kinetic barriers, leading to ammonia production at modest overpotentials. It also promotes an unusual Eley–Rideal-type mechanism, wherein NO is converted into N2O through a specifically adsorbed trans-(NO)2 dimer at lower overpotentials.

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54_28b/2015Back Cover: The Corrole Radical (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 28/2015)

“What do you see?” “I see a corrole radical!” An attempt to prepare sterically protected tungsten corroles led unexpectedly to the first free-base corrole radical. In their Communication on page 8213 ff., M. Bröring and co-workers report an air-stable and easy-to-handle open-shell 17π (4n+1) porphyrinoid with a SOMO that resembles the symmetry of a Rorschach picture. The observed loss of one inner hydrogen atom results in an effectively planar molecular structure and the ability to bind divalent metal ions, such as Zn2+.

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