IUBMB Life

Cover image for Vol. 66 Issue 11

Edited By: Angelo Azzi and William J. Whelan

Impact Factor: 2.755

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 115/185 (Cell Biology); 154/291 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1521-6551

Associated Title(s): Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, BioFactors

Featured

  • Heterochromatin structure: Lessons from the budding yeast

    Heterochromatin structure: Lessons from the budding yeast

    Modular structures of the Sir2, Sir3, and Sir4 proteins and their interacting partners. See text for description. (Adapted from ref. 2.). [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.]

  • The Na+/H+ exchanger and pH regulation in the heart

    The Na+/H+ exchanger and pH regulation in the heart

    Schematic model of NHE1 structure. NHE1 consists of two main domains: the 12-transmembrane segment domain where ion exchange takes place (TMI-TMXII) and the regulatory cytoplasmic domain. The cytoplasmic region is phosphorylated by various kinases and interacts with a number of proteins that modulate NHE1 activity at the plasma membrane. Regulatory proteins of particular importance in the myocardium are illustrated at approximate locations of action including calcineurin homologous proteins (CHPs), calmodulin (CaM; A: high-affinity binding site; B: intermediate-affinity binding site), carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), extracellular signal regulated protein 1/2 (ERK1/2), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p90RSK), serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (Sgk1), and protein kinase B (PKB).

  • Cells producing their own nemesis: Understanding methylglyoxal metabolism

    Cells producing their own nemesis: Understanding methylglyoxal metabolism

    Overview of the methylglyoxal metabolism. Abbreviations: G-6-P, glucose-6-phosphate; F-6-P, fructose-6-phosphate; F-1,6-P2, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate; Gld-3-P, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; DHAP, dihydroxyacetone phosphate; 1,3-BisPG, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate; Gly-P, glycerolphosphate; GSH, glutathione; MSH, mycothiol; TSH, trypanothione; Gld, glyceraldehydes. The enzymes involved in the reactions: TPI, triosephosphate isomerase; Mgs, methylglyoxal synthase; GlxI, glyoxalase I; GlxII, glyoxalase II; d-Ldh, d-lactate dehydrogenase; l-Ldh, l-lactate dehydrogenase; l-thr dh, l-threonine dehydrogenase; Acac decarb, acetoacetate decarboxylase; MG red, methylglyoxalreductase; l-lac dh, l-lactaldehyde dehydrogenase; Ac mono ox, acetolmonooxygenase; Ald dh, aldehyde dehydrogenase; MG dh, methylglyoxal dehydrogenase; Sorb dh, sorbitol dehydrogenase; Rpi, ribose-5 phosphate isomerase; Rpe, ribulose-5 phosphate epimerase; Trk, transketolase; Aldose red, aldose reductase. Substrates in green are the initiators of methylglyoxal-producing reactions. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.]

  • Physicochemical analysis of structural alteration and advanced glycation end products generation during glycation of H2A histone by 3-deoxyglucosone

    Physicochemical analysis of structural alteration and advanced glycation end products generation during glycation of H2A histone by 3‐deoxyglucosone

    Far-UV CD profiles of native histone H2A () and 3-DG-glycated H2A histone (). The far-UV CD spectra were recorded between 190 nm and 250 nm. The protein concentration was 0.5 mg/mL and the path length was 1.0 cm.

  • Regulation of sonic hedgehog expression by integrin β1 and epidermal growth factor receptor in intestinal epithelium

    Regulation of sonic hedgehog expression by integrin β1 and epidermal growth factor receptor in intestinal epithelium

    Evidence of increased proliferative signal transduction in intestinal epithelium from Itgb1Δ mice. A and B: Ki-67 immunofluorescence micrographs of small intestinal sections of P6 WT (A) and P6 Itgb1Δ mice (B). The white and red arrows identify Ki-67-positive intestinal epithelial crypt and villous cells, respectively. *P < 0.05 compared with controls. C: Western blots showing expression of integrin β1 and levels of phospho-MEK-1/2 proteins in IECs of P6 WT and Itgb1Δ mice. Actin loading controls are shown. The results shown are typical of two separate experiments. D: Immunofluorescence micrographs showing phospho-MEK1 in IECs in the small intestinal crypts (white arrowheads) and villi (black arrowheads) of P6 WT and Itgb1Δ mice. Solid lines outline crypts and villi. Dotted lines outline the border of IECs and stroma. E: Immunoblots showing EGFR, ErbB-2, ErbB-3, c-Cbl, and actin protein levels in small IEC lysates obtained from WT and Itgb1Δ mice. The results shown are typical of two separate experiments.

  • Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis

    Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis

    Expression of Nrdp1 as well as cleaved caspase 3 is increased in TMZ induced apoptosis. The U118 MG and U87 cells were exposed to TMZ at 100 µM for 0 H, 6 H, 12 H, 24 H, and 36 H, then the cells were harvested and performed for the detection of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3. (A) The representative image of western blotting. (B and C) The statistical analysis of the relative level of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3. *P < 0.05; **P < 0.01.

  • 2,3,5,4′-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against lysophosphatidylcholine-induced apoptosis by upregulating superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase

    2,3,5,4′‐tetrahydroxystilbene‐2‐O‐β‐d‐glucoside protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against lysophosphatidylcholine‐induced apoptosis by upregulating superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase

    TSG abolished LPC-induced apoptosis to HUVECs in vitro. Transmission electron microscope micrographs of HUVECs treated with different compounds as indicated for 24 H. DMEM: Abundant mitochondria were seen in the cytoplasm. LPC: The cells exposed with LPC 10.0 µg/mL showed an abundance of cytoplasmic vacuolation and swollen mitochondria. Simvastatin+LPC: Reduced cytoplasmic vacuolation and swollen mitochondria were seen in the cytoplasm. TSG+LPC: With the increase of concentration of TSG, mitochondria condition was improved markedly (original magnification ×30,000). In all treatment groups, swollen mitochondria were detected in comparison to that of DMEM control group. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.]

  • Heterochromatin structure: Lessons from the budding yeast
  • The Na+/H+ exchanger and pH regulation in the heart
  • Cells producing their own nemesis: Understanding methylglyoxal metabolism
  • Physicochemical analysis of structural alteration and advanced glycation end products generation during glycation of H2A histone by 3‐deoxyglucosone
  • Regulation of sonic hedgehog expression by integrin β1 and epidermal growth factor receptor in intestinal epithelium
  • Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis
  • 2,3,5,4′‐tetrahydroxystilbene‐2‐O‐β‐d‐glucoside protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against lysophosphatidylcholine‐induced apoptosis by upregulating superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase

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Molecular basis of disease: understanding causes and targeting therapies
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IUBMB Life moving to online only in 2015

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IUBMB Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies

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2014 IUBMB Life Young Investigator Award

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On behalf of the IUBMB, IUBMB Life, and Wiley, it is with great pleasure and honor that we announce Liudmila Abrosimova as the recipient of the 2014 IUBMB Life - Wiley Young Investigator Award for her article, Thermo-switchable activity of the restriction endonuclease Ssoll achieved by site-directed enzyme modification.

Ms. Abrosimova is affiliated with the Department of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, Department of Chemistry, and Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology at Lomonosov Moscow State University. She will be honored with the 2014 IUBMB Life - Wiley Young Investigator Award at the 15th IUBMB - 24th FAOBMB - TSBMB Conference this October 21 - 26, in Taipei, Taiwan, and her award-winning article will be FREELY available online through the conference.

Please join us in congratulating Ms. Abrosimova as the recipient of the annual IUBMB Life – Wiley Young Investigator Award!

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