IUBMB Life

Cover image for Vol. 67 Issue 8

Edited By: Angelo Azzi and William J. Whelan

Impact Factor: 3.143

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 102/184 (Cell Biology); 115/289 (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology)

Online ISSN: 1521-6551

Associated Title(s): Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, BioFactors

Featured

  • Curcumin attenuates ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis through modulating Nrf2/FXR signaling in hepatocytes

    Curcumin attenuates ethanol‐induced hepatic steatosis through modulating Nrf2/FXR signaling in hepatocytes

    Curcumin attenuates ethanol-induced liver injury. Rats were grouped: group 1, vehicle control (no ethanol, no treatment); group 2, model group (with ethanol, no treatment); group 3, curcumin-treated group (100 mg/kg + ethanol); group 4, curcumin-treated group (200 mg/kg + ethanol); group 5, curcumin treated group (400 mg/kg + ethanol). (A) Determination of activities of AST, ALT, ALP, and LDH in serum. (B) Representative pictures of rat livers. (C) Liver sections were stained with H&E (original magnification, ×20). (D) Immunohistochemistry for CD45 in liver tissues (original magnification, ×20). (E) Western blot analyses of the expression of proinflammatory signal molecules. For the statistics of each panel in this figure, data are expressed as mean±SD, # #P < 0.01 versus group 1, # # #P < 0.001 versus group 1, *P < 0.05 versus group 2, **P < 0.01 versus group 2, ***P < 0.001 versus group 2, n = 10.

  • Biphasic decline of β-cell function with age in euglycemic nonobese diabetic mice parallels diabetes onset

    Biphasic decline of β‐cell function with age in euglycemic nonobese diabetic mice parallels diabetes onset

    Cell proliferation in pancreatic islets. Confocal microscopy images of representative pancreatic islets from young (C, D) and old nondiabetic (E, F) NOD mice as well as from corresponding controls including NOD scid (A) and C57BL/6 mice (B). Pancreatic sections were stained for DAPI (blue), insulin (red), glucagon (green), and Ki67 (a proliferation marker, white).

  • The angiogenic responses induced by release of angiogenic proteins from tumor cell-activated platelets are regulated by distinct molecular pathways

    The angiogenic responses induced by release of angiogenic proteins from tumor cell‐activated platelets are regulated by distinct molecular pathways

    The levels of angiogenic proteins in the releasate of A549 activated Plts. The release of angiogenic regulators was measured using human angiogenesis antibody arrays. Representative graph of angiogenic factors were found to have a 1.5-fold increase at least.

  • Regional changes of placental vascularization in preeclampsia: A review

    Regional changes of placental vascularization in preeclampsia: A review

    Placental regional differences in vital genes involved in placental development may influence pregnancy outcome. CM, central maternal; CF, central fetal; PM, peripheral maternal; PF, peripheral fetal.

  • The circular relationship between matrix metalloproteinase-9 and inflammation following myocardial infarction

    The circular relationship between matrix metalloproteinase‐9 and inflammation following myocardial infarction

    A diagram illustrating activation and inactivation of cytokines and chemokines by matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Post-MI, a high local cytokine concentration recruits neutrophils to the infarct region (1). Neutrophils release MMP-9 containing gelatinase granules. With time, cytokine levels are reduced (2), and eventually neutrophil recruitment slows down (3).

  • New insights into T cells and their signature cytokines in atopic dermatitis

    New insights into T cells and their signature cytokines in atopic dermatitis

    A schematic illustration of CD4+ T cell-mediated immune pathogenesis of AD. Clinically nonlesional skin of patients with AD, despite “healthy appearance,” exhibits infiltration of T cells that produce inflammatory mediators and lead to decreased epidermal differentiation.

  • Myostatin: Expanding horizons

    Myostatin: Expanding horizons

    Myostatin structure and proteolytic processing. Schematic representation of the structure of myostatin protein. Precursor myostatin protein contains an N-terminal (NH2) signal peptide (SP) for secretion and a C-terminal (COOH) region that contains nine conserved cysteine residues (c), which are critical for eventual homodimerisation and “cysteine knot” formation. Precursor myostatin protein is proteolytically processed by the serine protease Furin at the Golgi to give rise to LAP and mature myostatin.

  • Curcumin attenuates ethanol‐induced hepatic steatosis through modulating Nrf2/FXR signaling in hepatocytes
  • Biphasic decline of β‐cell function with age in euglycemic nonobese diabetic mice parallels diabetes onset
  • The angiogenic responses induced by release of angiogenic proteins from tumor cell‐activated platelets are regulated by distinct molecular pathways
  • Regional changes of placental vascularization in preeclampsia: A review
  • The circular relationship between matrix metalloproteinase‐9 and inflammation following myocardial infarction
  • New insights into T cells and their signature cytokines in atopic dermatitis
  • Myostatin: Expanding horizons

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Volume 66, Issue 3, March 2014

Understanding circadian gene function: Animal models of tissue-specific circadian disruption
Tana L. Birky, Molly S. Bray
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News

2014 Impact Factor:
IUBMB Life is pleased to announce its 2014 Impact Factor has increased to 3.143!

2015 Release of Journal Citation Reports®
Source: Thomson Reuters 2014 Citation Data

 Miami Symposium 2016

IUBMB Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies

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We’re pleased to present a new Joint Virtual Issue on Cancer Therapies in celebration of the IUBMB 2015 Miami Winter Symposium, featuring articles from Biofactors, Biotechnologyand Applied Biochemistry, and IUBMB Life.

2015 IUBMB Life Young Investigator Award

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On behalf of the IUBMB, IUBMB Life, and Wiley, it is with great pleasure and honor that we announce Yang Chao as the recipient of the 2015 IUBMB Life - Wiley Young Investigator Award for his article, Aquaporin-4 knockdown ameliorates hypoxic-ischemic cerebral edema in newborn piglets.

Yang Chao, M. D. is an attending physician in Department of Radiology at Dalian Medical University of China, His research interest is in molecular imaging and neuroimaging. The winning article Aquaporin-4 knockdown ameliorates hypoxic-ischemic cerebral edema in newborn piglets is main part of his doctoral thesis under guidance of professor Bian Jie. Yang Chao will be honored with the 2015 IUBMB Life - Wiley Young Investigator Award at the 23rd International Union for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB) Congress and 44th Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil from August 24th to 28th, 2015, and his award-winning article will be FREELY available online through the conference.

Please join us in congratulating Mr. Yang Chao as the recipient of the annual IUBMB Life– Wiley Young Investigator Award!

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