Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 12

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 5.622

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 15/133 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Featured

  • Challenges in the Acquisition and Analysis of Bone Microstructure During Growth

    Challenges in the Acquisition and Analysis of Bone Microstructure During Growth

    (Left panel) Growth velocity of the total body length decelerates after birth then accelerates at 1 year of age due to acceleration of the growth of the legs. Truncal growth accelerates at puberty. Males have a longer prepubertal and intrapubertal growth period than females. (Middle panel) Metaphyseal trabeculae coalesce to form the metaphyseal cortex. (Right panel) Incorrect segmentation of trabecular from cortical bone may result in this being “seen” as cortical bone.

  • Activation of Wnt Signaling by Mechanical Loading Is Impaired in the Bone of Old Mice

    Activation of Wnt Signaling by Mechanical Loading Is Impaired in the Bone of Old Mice

    (A) An example of a mid-diaphyseal section from a single-bout loaded tibia imaged by fluorescence microscopy. For dynamic histomorphometry, the entire cross-section was analyzed. The dashed square (20× magnification) highlights the posterolateral region of peak compressive strain where we determined the percentage of sclerostin-positive (Fig. ) and Wnt-positive (Fig. ) osteocytes. The image is from a 5-month-old loaded tibia. The solid square (40×) illustrates a higher magnification of the region. (B) Periosteal and (C) endocortical single-labeled surface (based on calcein, day 5) of 5-month-old, 12-month-old, and 22-month-old tibias loaded for 5 days and control tibias. (D) Periosteal and endocortical mineralizing surface (based on calcein day 3, alizarin day 8) of 5-month-old, 12-month-old, and 22-month-old tibias loaded for 1 day and control tibias. Data are represented as mean ± SD. *Loaded versus Control; Bars = 5-month-old versus 12-month-old versus 22-month-old of loaded tibias; p < 0.05. Ec = endocortical; Ct = cortical; Ps = periosteal; BS = bone surface; Ps.sLS = periosteal single-labeled surface; Ps.MS = periosteal mineralizing surface; Ec.sLS = endocortical single-labeled surface; Ec.MS = endocortical mineralizing surface.

  • Acute Phosphate Restriction Impairs Bone Formation and Increases Marrow Adipose Tissue in Growing Mice

    Acute Phosphate Restriction Impairs Bone Formation and Increases Marrow Adipose Tissue in Growing Mice

    Phosphate restriction of growing mice acutely impairs bone formation in mixed-gender mice. (A) Calcein double labels (insets) and osteoid (white asterisk) (Cont, 3 females and 2 males; Low Pi, 2 females and 3 males). (B, C) Static and dynamic histomorphometric parameters. BV/TV = bone volume/tissue volume; MAR = mineral apposition rate; BFR/BS = bone formation rate/bone surface; OV/BV = osteoid volume/bone volume; MS/BS = mineralizing surface/bone surface; Ob.S/BS = osteoblast surface/bone surface; ES/BS = eroded surface/bone surface; Oc.S/BS = osteoclast surface/bone surface; Lc.S/BS = quiescent bone lining cell surface/bone surface; Tb.Th = trabecular thickness; Tb.Sp = Trabecular spacing; Tb.N = trabecular number; N.Oc = osteoclast number. Data represent mean ± SE from 5 randomly assigned mixed-gender mice/group fed control or phosphate-restricted diet d28–31 with calcein administered at d29 and d30. d28–31 = days 28 through 31; Cont = control chow-fed mice; Low Pi = phosphate-restricted mice; circles = females; triangles = males. *p < 0.05 versus age-matched control.

  • Discoidin Receptor 2 Controls Bone Formation and Marrow Adipogenesis

    Discoidin Receptor 2 Controls Bone Formation and Marrow Adipogenesis

    Decreased trabecular and cortical bone, bone formation, and osteoblast gene expression in Ddr2slie/slie mice. Trabecular and cortical bone parameters were measured by μCT in 5-month-old Ddr2wt/wt (wild-type [WT]), Ddr2slie/wt (hetero), or Ddr2slie/slie (homo) female mice. (A) Representative μCT images of tibia showing trabecular and cortical bone. (B–E) Measurements are shown for trabecular bone volume over total volume (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, mm) and trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp, mm). (F) Cortical BV/TV. (G–I) Dynamic bone histomorphometry. For measurement of bone formation parameters, 12-week-old female mice were injected with calcine and Alizarin Red followed by measurement of mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR). Representative fluorescent images are shown in (G). (J–L) Osteoblast marker mRNAs. RNA was extracted from whole bones of 5-month-old females and the following mRNAs were measured: Runx2, Bglap2, and Ibsp. (M) Serum levels of total osteocalcin (Bglap2). n = 8/group; statistically significant at *p < 0.01.

  • Novel Genetic Variants Associated With Increased Vertebral Volumetric BMD, Reduced Vertebral Fracture Risk, and Increased Expression of SLC1A3 and EPHB2

    Novel Genetic Variants Associated With Increased Vertebral Volumetric BMD, Reduced Vertebral Fracture Risk, and Increased Expression of SLC1A3 and EPHB2

    Cross-sectional view of the trabecular region of interest in the lumbar spine. Trabecular vBMD included this region only, whereas integral vBMD also included the cortical compartment. Both exclude the posterior elements that DXA measures of BMD incorporate, thus allowing CT measures to more precisely capture BMD of the vertebral body itself. Reprinted with permission from Elsevier from: Engelke K, Mastmeyer A, Bousson V, Fuerst T, Laredo J-D, Kalender WA. Reanalysis precision of 3D quantitative computed tomography (QCT) of the spine. Bone, 2009:44(4):566–72.

  • Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

    Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

    Illustration of semiautomated algorithm used to measure kyphosis (Cobb) angle (T4–T12) on CT scout images (SpineAnalyzer; Optasia Medical, Cheadle, UK).

  • Challenges in the Acquisition and Analysis of Bone Microstructure During Growth
  • Activation of Wnt Signaling by Mechanical Loading Is Impaired in the Bone of Old Mice
  • Acute Phosphate Restriction Impairs Bone Formation and Increases Marrow Adipose Tissue in Growing Mice
  • Discoidin Receptor 2 Controls Bone Formation and Marrow Adipogenesis
  • Novel Genetic Variants Associated With Increased Vertebral Volumetric BMD, Reduced Vertebral Fracture Risk, and Increased Expression of SLC1A3 and EPHB2
  • Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

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eCompendia – special issues of recent JBMR® articles on hot topics

eCompendia bring together recently published JBMR® articles on topical issues. Specific topics are selected for each eCompendium to provide the reader with an easy-to-access update that brings together original research articles in the chosen area.

Examples of topics addressed in recent eCompendia include Kidney Disease and Bone, Sclerostin: Preclinical and Clinical Studies and Genetics of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

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ASBMR 2016 Publications Workshop Presentation

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JBMR's 30th Anniversary: Cause for Celebration

eCompendia Series

Celebrate the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 30th Anniversary! Browse our new timeline and see key milestones over the years!

Read the Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Juliet Compston right here

Announcing

JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


STROBE: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of human observational case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies are now required to upload the STROBE checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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