Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 4

Edited By: Juliet E Compston

Impact Factor: 6.832

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 12/128 (Endocrinology & Metabolism)

Online ISSN: 1523-4681

Featured

  • Deletion of Rac in Mature Osteoclasts Causes Osteopetrosis, an Age-Dependent Change in Osteoclast Number, and a Reduced Number of Osteoblasts In Vivo

    Deletion of Rac in Mature Osteoclasts Causes Osteopetrosis, an Age‐Dependent Change in Osteoclast Number, and a Reduced Number of Osteoblasts In Vivo

    Disruption of the osteocytic network in DKO mice. (A) Upper panels: 10× magnification of femoral cortex in CTRL (left) and DKO (right) mice. The DAPI/phalloidin staining shows the abnormal osteocytic network in the DKO bone. Lower panels: 100× magnification of osteocytes in CTRL (left) and DKO (right) femoral cortex demonstrates discontinuities in the osteocyte network across the seams in the DKO bone found in the bright-field images in both the upper (red arrow) and lower panels. (B) Upper panels: 10× magnification of humeral cortex in CTRL (left) and DKO (right) mice. Lower panels: 100× magnification of osteocytes in CTRL (left) and DKO (right) humeral cortex demonstrates discontinuities in the osteocyte network across the seams on the DKO bone observed in the bright-field images in both the upper third panel (red arrow) and lower third panels. The animals were 17 weeks old.

  • Randomized Placebo-Controlled and Controlled Non-Inferiority Phase III Trials Comparing Trafermin, a Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor 2, and Enamel Matrix Derivative in Periodontal Regeneration in Intrabony Defects

    Randomized Placebo‐Controlled and Controlled Non‐Inferiority Phase III Trials Comparing Trafermin, a Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor 2, and Enamel Matrix Derivative in Periodontal Regeneration in Intrabony Defects

    Outcome of rhFGF-2 administration by dental radiographs (Study A). Radiographic outcome of a FGF-2–administered individual. A 0.3% FGF-2–administered 45-year-old man. The arrows indicate the remaining alveolar bone crest or the bottom of the bone defect. The depth of the intraosseous defect before administration was measured at 5.56 mm on the X-ray. The radiographs clearly show that the bone defect was filled with the newly generated alveolar bone at 36 weeks after administration. The percentage of bone fill at 36 weeks was 74.67%, with 3 mm CAL regained.

  • Quantitative, 3D Visualization of the Initiation and Progression of Vertebral Fractures Under Compression and Anterior Flexion

    Quantitative, 3D Visualization of the Initiation and Progression of Vertebral Fractures Under Compression and Anterior Flexion

    Regions of large endplate deflection (outlined in blue and red), defined as axial deflection exceeding 0.5 mm, superimposed on the distribution of apparent density (ρapp, grayscale) of the underlying trabecular bone and on the distribution of endplate volume fraction (Ep.BV/TV, grayscale): The lightest blue outline corresponds to the loading increment just prior to or at the peak of loading. The boundaries at subsequent increments are represented with progressively darker shades of blue. The red outline corresponds to the endplate deflection remaining after the test was complete and all applied loads were removed.

  • Incidence and Characteristics of Atypical Femoral Fractures: Clinical and Geometrical Data

    Incidence and Characteristics of Atypical Femoral Fractures: Clinical and Geometrical Data

    Geometrical hip measurements. All measurements are taken from a supine anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis. Femoral offset = the distance along the mediolateral direction from the center of rotation of the femoral head to a line bisecting the long axis of the femur; Distance between femoral head rotation center and pelvic center = the distance in the mediolateral direction from the center of rotation of the femoral head to a line bisecting the long axis of the pelvis and spine; Femoral head diameter = distance between two points lying on the circumference of the femoral head when measured by a straight line passing through the center of the femoral head; Neck-shaft angle = angle represented by a line bisecting the long axis of the femur and a line bisecting the center of the femoral neck and the center of the femoral head; Canal width (lesser trochanter + 20 mm) = mediolateral distance from the inner cortex of the medial femoral cortex to inner cortex of the lateral femoral cortex at a given distance of 20 mm proximal to the most proximal point of the lesser trochanter; Canal width (lesser trochanter – 50 mm) = mediolateral distance from the inner cortex of the medial femoral cortex to inner cortex of the lateral femoral cortex at a given distance of 50 mm distal to the most distal point of the lesser trochanter; Canal width (lesser trochanter – 100 mm) = mediolateral distance from the inner cortex of the medial femoral cortex to inner cortex of the lateral femoral cortex at a given distance of 100 mm distal to the most distal point of the lesser trochanter; Lateral cortical width (lesser trochanter) = thickness of the lateral femoral cortex at the central level of the lesser trochanter; Medial cortical width (lesser trochanter) = thickness of the medial femoral cortex at the most distal point of the lesser trochanter; Lateral cortical width (lesser trochanter – 50 mm) = thickness of the lateral femoral cortex at a given distance of 50 mm distal to the most distal point of the lesser trochanter; Medial cortical width (lesser trochanter – 50 mm) = thickness of the medial femoral cortex at a given distance of 50 mm distal to the most distal point of the lesser trochanter; and Femoral neck width = smallest distance between the lateral and the medial cortices of the femoral neck measured by a straight line perpendicular to the longitudinal neck axis.

  • Determinants of Transitional Zone Area and Porosity of the Proximal Femur Quantified In Vivo in Postmenopausal Women

    Determinants of Transitional Zone Area and Porosity of the Proximal Femur Quantified In Vivo in Postmenopausal Women

    For two tubular bones, A had a larger TCSA than B, larger medullary cavity, larger total cortical CSA (compact cortex + transitional zone), larger transitional zone CSA as a proportion of TCSA, but smaller compact cortex CSA as a proportion of TCSA and higher porosity within each of the cortical compartments. CSA = cross-sectional area; TCSA = total cross-sectional area.

  • A High Amount of Local Adipose Tissue Is Associated With High Cortical Porosity and Low Bone Material Strength in Older Women

    A High Amount of Local Adipose Tissue Is Associated With High Cortical Porosity and Low Bone Material Strength in Older Women

    Cortical porosity (%) measured at the distal tibia versus crude (not adjusted for operator) bone material strength index in 200 older women.

  • Deletion of Rac in Mature Osteoclasts Causes Osteopetrosis, an Age‐Dependent Change in Osteoclast Number, and a Reduced Number of Osteoblasts In Vivo
  • Randomized Placebo‐Controlled and Controlled Non‐Inferiority Phase III Trials Comparing Trafermin, a Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor 2, and Enamel Matrix Derivative in Periodontal Regeneration in Intrabony Defects
  • Quantitative, 3D Visualization of the Initiation and Progression of Vertebral Fractures Under Compression and Anterior Flexion
  • Incidence and Characteristics of Atypical Femoral Fractures: Clinical and Geometrical Data
  • Determinants of Transitional Zone Area and Porosity of the Proximal Femur Quantified In Vivo in Postmenopausal Women
  • A High Amount of Local Adipose Tissue Is Associated With High Cortical Porosity and Low Bone Material Strength in Older Women

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eCompendia bring together recently published JBMR® articles on topical issues. Specific topics are selected for each eCompendium to provide the reader with an easy-to-access update that brings together original research articles in the chosen area.

Examples of topics addressed in recent eCompendia include Kidney Disease and Bone, Sclerostin: Preclinical and Clinical Studies and Genetics of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

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ASBMR 2015 Publications Workshop Presentation

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JBMR's 30th Anniversary: Cause for Celebration

30anniversary

Read the Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Juliet Compston right here

Announcing

JBMR® Announces Workflow Changes and Author Guidelines Updates

In response to rising concerns over the reproducibility of biomedical research, the author guidelines and submission procedures for the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research’s (JBMR®) have recently been updated. These updates affect the submission workflow of author forms required for peer review and publication, as detailed below:


ARRIVE: Authors submitting research on animal studies are now required to complete an adapted ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) checklist at submission.


CONSORT: Authors of manuscripts reporting results of clinical trials are now required to upload the CONSORT checklist at submission.


Author Agreement: The conflict of interest (COI) and copyright transfer (CTA) portions of the current Author Agreement can now be completed electronically as a web form, eliminating the need for authors to print, scan and upload a PDF form upon submission.


• COI information will be collected during submission via an online questionnaire on ScholarOne.


• The CTA will be completed at manuscript acceptance: If a manuscript is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will receive an e-mail prompt to log in to Author Services. Author Services is a Wiley web application that provides production tracking, as well as other resources for authors. From this site, corresponding authors can complete the CTA on behalf of all authors on the paper.

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