Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 3

Impact Factor: 2.939

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 16/76 (Geochemistry & Geophysics)

Online ISSN: 1525-2027

Featured

  • Map of Noridc Seas

    Map of Noridc Seas

    (a) Map of the Nordic seas showing major surface and bottom currents and the location of core JM05-31GC in the northeastern part of the Fram Strait. (b) CTD profile (conductivity, temperature, depth) taken in August 2012 at the core site.

  • Surface strain pattern due to inflation of either the conduit, the dyke, the upper magma chamber, or the lower magma chamber

    Surface strain pattern due to inflation of either the conduit, the dyke, the upper magma chamber, or the lower magma chamber

    Resulting surface strain pattern due to inflation of either (a) the conduit, (b) the dyke, (c) the upper magma chamber, or (d) the lower magma chamber. The plots indicate the run of the nodal line, which marks the signal reversal in volumetric strain changes. Positive strain (shaded in orange) indicates volumetric expansion, while negative strain (shaded in blue) indicates contraction. Pressure changes in each of the segments of the magmatic system generate strain changes at the sampling sites AIRS, GERD, and TRNT at a specific ratio. As such, strain ratios are indicative for the determination of operating sources during an eruption event. Note that the magnitude of pressure changes only influences the absolute strain changes, but not the relative ratios.

  • Tectonic setting and distribution of the late Cenozoic volcanoes in the SW Japan arc

    Tectonic setting and distribution of the late Cenozoic volcanoes in the SW Japan arc

    Tectonic setting and distribution of the late Cenozoic volcanoes in the SW Japan arc. (a) The Quaternary volcanic arc develops in response to the subduction of the Shikoku Basin of the Philippine Sea Plate slab in the SW Japan arc. (b) The Quaternary volcanoes consist of basalt monogenetic volcano clusters and adakitic dacite eruption centers. Eruption centers of the Miocene Setouch high-Mg andesites are also shown. The Quaternary volcanic centers are subparallel to the seismic-aseismic transition of the Shikoku Basin plate slab. The aseismic slab can be traced tomographically to 370 km deep beneath the Japan Sea as shown by short-dashed lines [Zhao et al., ]. Slab tear windows are also imaged (see shaded areas in Figure b). Also shown are regions of low-frequency tremors above the slab beneath Shikoku [Obara, ]. Lines A and B are positions of cross sections shown in Figure . Seismicity contours are from Nakajima and Hasegawa []. Basement granitoid distribution is from Kagami et al. [].

  • Spatial distribution of materials in subcrater deposits

    Spatial distribution of materials in subcrater deposits

    Simple map showing the spatial distribution of materials in subcrater deposits as they would be exposed with the removal of subcrater deposits and ejecta. This highlights the concentric nature of the deformation and dominance of shallow units in these structures.

  • Shape and Lattice Preferred Orientation data

    Shape and Lattice Preferred Orientation data

    Shape and Lattice Preferred Orientation data. From the left-hand side to right: (a) depth location of selected lava field samples; (b) plagioclase SPO (rose diagrams) showing the percentage of plagioclase crystals as a function of orientation of the long axis measured on thin sections that lay on the horizontal plane (North-up projections), data binning with a continuous weighting function is also shown [see, e.g., Fisher, ; Mitchell et al., ]; (c)–(e) plagioclase LPO and pyroxene LPO plots are density functions of the given crystallographic plane projected onto a lower hemisphere (North-up, equal-area projections); pole densities are represented in multiples of a random distribution (m.r.d.); (f) calculated Vp seismic velocities (km s−1, North-up, equal-area projections) using the LPO data as described in the text; (g) horizontal (x, y), and vertical (z) directional P wave velocities (PWS) on core samples (data are from Wilson et al. []).

  • Location of core WIND28K off Madagascar at 4157m water depth in the Amirante Passage, Indian Ocean

    Location of core WIND28K off Madagascar at 4157m water depth in the Amirante Passage, Indian Ocean

    Location of core WIND28K [McCave et al., 2001] (10°9.23′S, 51°46.15′E) off Madagascar at 4157 m water depth in the Amirante Passage, Indian Ocean. Other core sites mentioned in the text (ODP723 [Emeis et al., ]; TY93-929/P [Rostek et al., ]; SK157/4 [Saraswat et al., ]; GeoB10038 [Mohtadi et al., ]; SK237 [Saraswat et al., ]; and GeoB12615 [Romahn et al., ]) are also indicated. Map colors represent annual average temperatures at 50 m water depth (World Ocean Atlas 2005 [Locarnini et al., ], plotted with Ocean Data View [Schlitzer, , 2012]). Cool areas off the coast of Oman and to the east of WIND28K are regions of upwelling [Schott et al., ]. Blue arrows show the flow of Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCPDW) below 3800 m and red arrows indicate surface currents. The Indonesian Through Flow (ITF) flows east into the South Equatorial Current (SEC) which splits around Madagascar and rejoins, ultimately flowing into the Atlantic. Representation of currents is after McCave et al. [].

  • Combined unwrapped coseismic interferograms for flight lines 26501, 26505, and 08508 for the October 2009 – April 2010 time period

    Combined unwrapped coseismic interferograms for flight lines 26501, 26505, and 08508 for the October 2009 – April 2010 time period

    Combined unwrapped coseismic interferograms for flight lines 26501, 26505, and 08508 for the October 2009 to April 2010 time period. End points of observable slip on the Imperial, Superstition Hills, and Elmore Ranch Faults are shown. GPS stations are marked by dots and are labeled. Areas where profiles are discussed are noted by boxes or dotted lines crossing the discontinuities. Average inferred slip and sense of motion is noted for each fault.

  • Map of Noridc Seas
  • Surface strain pattern due to inflation of either the conduit, the dyke, the upper magma chamber, or the lower magma chamber
  • Tectonic setting and distribution of the late Cenozoic volcanoes in the SW Japan arc
  • Spatial distribution of materials in subcrater deposits
  • Shape and Lattice Preferred Orientation data
  • Location of core WIND28K off Madagascar at 4157m water depth in the Amirante Passage, Indian Ocean
  • Combined unwrapped coseismic interferograms for flight lines 26501, 26505, and 08508 for the October 2009 – April 2010 time period

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