Birth Defects Research Part C: Embryo Today: Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 102 Issue 1

Edited By: Rocky S. Tuan

Impact Factor: 4.442

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2012: 8/41 (Developmental Biology); 24/85 (Toxicology)

Online ISSN: 1542-9768

Associated Title(s): Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology, Birth Defects Research Part B: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology

Featured

  • Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development

    Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development

    Line drawing of Veratrum californicum. Note the large lily-like leaves and long inflorescence.

  • Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development

    Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development

    X-ray computed tomography scan of a monkey-faced lamb showing the synopthalmia.

  • Plant alkaloids that cause developmental defects through the disruption of cholinergic neurotransmission

    Plant alkaloids that cause developmental defects through the disruption of cholinergic neurotransmission

    The effect of anabasine, lobeline, and myosmine on fetal movement in the day 40 pregnant goat. The bars represent the mean ± SEM number of fetal movements detected during a five minute fetal ultrasound monitoring period of nine fetuses dosed with saline (0.4 ml/kg), seven anabasine (0.8 mg/kg), eight lobeline (4.0 mg/kg) eight myosmine (5.0 mg/kg), and eight nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) dosed does. Fetal movements were measured at time zero, just prior to i.v. injection and at 0.5 and 1 hr after i.v. dosing. There were significant differences among the treatments (*p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's multiple comparison test). Data from Green et al. ().

  • Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins

    Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins

    World-wide distribution of cycads (green). [from Wikipedia, 20 March 2006].

  • Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins

    Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins

    Effect of MAM on rodent brain development. (A) Intrauterine exposure to a single injection of MAM produces an animal model with neuroanatomical and neurobehavioral features of drug-resistant epilepsy or schizophrenia. After birth, neonatal or adult rodents that have been treated with single or multiple injections of MAM develop motor dysfunction (i.e., ataxia) or cognitive dysfunction, respectively. Adult rodents that have been treated with azoxymethane (metabolic precursor of MAM) daily for several weeks also develop hepatotoxicity or colon cancer. (B) Growth of neonatal (PND22) mice after treatment on postnatal day 3 with a single injection of saline or MAM (325 μmol/kg; top). Note the pronounced effect of the cycad genotoxin on development. Light micrographs of representative areas from cresyl violet stained parasaggittal sections (10 μm) of the cerebellum from postnatal day 4 (PND4) and 22 (PND22) C57BL/6 mice pups similarly treated at PND3 with either saline or MAM (bottom). Note that the staining in the granule cell layer is significantly reduced (cerebellar atrophy) only in PND22 mice. [modified from (Kisby et al., )]

  • Prenatal effects of maternal consumption of polyphenol-rich foods in late pregnancy upon fetal ductus arteriosus

    Prenatal effects of maternal consumption of polyphenol‐rich foods in late pregnancy upon fetal ductus arteriosus

    Ductal constriction in a 32 weeks fetus exposed to high concentration of polyphenols. Notice the severe narrowing of the ductus, with turbulent flow across the vessel at color flow mapping.

  • Flavonoids, derived from traditional chinese medicines, show roles in the differentiation of neurons: Possible targets in developing health food products

    Flavonoids, derived from traditional chinese medicines, show roles in the differentiation of neurons: Possible targets in developing health food products

    The chemical structures of different classes of flavonoids. According to the distinct bone structures, flavonoids are classified into different subclasses: flavones, isoflavones, flavanones, flavonols, flavanonols, chalcones, dihydrochalcones, flavanes, and aurones.

  • Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development
  • Poisonous plants: Effects on embryo and fetal development
  • Plant alkaloids that cause developmental defects through the disruption of cholinergic neurotransmission
  • Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins
  • Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins
  • Prenatal effects of maternal consumption of polyphenol‐rich foods in late pregnancy upon fetal ductus arteriosus
  • Flavonoids, derived from traditional chinese medicines, show roles in the differentiation of neurons: Possible targets in developing health food products

Recently Published Issues

See all

Top Downloaded Articles

Check out these top downloaded articles for FREE for a limited time!

Organ repair and regeneration: An overview
Joëlle A. Baddour, Konstantinos Sousounis, Panagiotis A. Tsonis

Zebrafish embryos and larvae: A new generation of disease models and drug screens
Shaukat Ali, Danielle L. Champagne, Herman P. Spaink, Michael K. Richardson

Computational models for mechanics of morphogenesis
Matthew A. Wyczalkowski, Zi Chen, Benjamen A. Filas, Victor D. Varner, Larry A. Taber

Mouse as a model for multifactorial inheritance of neural tube defects
Irene E. Zohn

Scarless fetal skin wound healing update
David D. Lo, Andrew S. Zimmermann, Allison Nauta, Michael T. Longaker, H. Peter Lorenz

The Teratology Society Student & Post-Doc Corner

BDR Connection

The Student & Post-Doc Corner was conceived, designed, and developed by student members of the Teratology Society and is specifically designed to promote student involvement in the Society. The website is an up-to-date forum for communication and information exchange for Teratology Society events, educational materials, and career opportunities as they relate to graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

The Teratology Society provides an excellent medium for students and investigators to network, ask questions, develop critical thinking, and broaden research skills in this fascinating field. Participating in the Teratology Society whether through giving a talk, presenting a poster, attending lectures, or inquiring about other investigators research, provides an excellent basis to understanding what it takes to make a mark in the field.

Benefits of Becoming a Student Member Include:

  • Access to online services such as job and post-doc postings, networking tips, member database
  • Student Awards
  • Learn New Skills
  • Meet students and investigators in your field of research
  • Join Teratology Society committees
  • Membership looks good on the resume

Apply to become a member today!

The Teratology Society 54th Annual Meeting

Sign up for Content Alerts

Never miss an issue!
Get the table of contents emailed to you for free each time an issue is published online.
You can find it listed under Journal Tools:

TOC Alerts

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION