Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds

Cover image for Vol. 27 Issue 2

Edited By: Nadia Magnenat Thalmann and Daniel Thalmann

Impact Factor: 0.463

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2014: 90/104 (Computer Science Software Engineering)

Online ISSN: 1546-427X

Featured

  • Animating synthetic dyadic conversations with variations based on context and agent attributes

    Animating synthetic dyadic conversations with variations based on context and agent attributes

    The marketplace scenario.

  • An embodied approach to arthropod animation

    An embodied approach to arthropod animation

    Select frames of a tarantula climbing onto a vertical wall. Green dots show the intersection bounds of the rudimentary sensing mechanism, used to judge the proximity and relative angle of objects in the creature's path.

  • A system for automatic animation of piano performances

    A system for automatic animation of piano performances

    Key poses of finger crossover while playing scales. The first row shows a key frame of the thumb crossing over the middle finger while playing the C-major scale, and the second row shows a key frame of the thumb crossing over the ring finger while playing the D-major scale, both from three perspectives. Note that the ring/middle finger firmly presses down the keys, the fingers avoid collisions with black keys in C-major, the wrist maintains a natural rotation, and the thumb is positioned well on the key to play it after crossing over.

  • Painterly rendering techniques: a state-of-the-art review of current approaches

    Painterly rendering techniques: a state-of-the-art review of current approaches

    A sample input source images (A and A ′ ) along with the target input images (B) with the result output (B ′ ) produced using techniques presented in .

  • Haptic collision handling for simulation of transnasal surgery

    Haptic collision handling for simulation of transnasal surgery

    The endoscope (green) inside the nasal cavity during simulation of transnasal surgery. In the larger image, some interior structures were made visible. The anatomy is complex and challenging for computation of tissue–tool interaction.

  • Animating synthetic dyadic conversations with variations based on context and agent attributes
  • An embodied approach to arthropod animation
  • A system for automatic animation of piano performances
  • Painterly rendering techniques: a state-of-the-art review of current approaches
  • Haptic collision handling for simulation of transnasal surgery

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Recently Published Articles

  1. An interactive computer-based simulation system for endovascular aneurysm repair surgeries

    Yanzhen Wang, Ferdinand Serracino-Inglott, Xiaodong Yi, Xue-Jun Yang and Xue-Feng Yuan

    Article first published online: 19 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.1713

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    This paper presents an interactive computer-based simulation system for surgical procedures of endovascular aneurysm repair. It converts patient-specific medical imaging data into a personalized virtual surgical environment, upon which efficient and stable modeling methods are developed for real-time simulation of catheterization, angiography, and stent graft deployment operations. An interactive feature is achieved through multi-modal feedbacks including both visual and haptic renderings integrated with the simulation hardware platform

  2. Online real-time locomotive motion transformation based on biomechanical observations

    Daseong Han, Seokpyo Hong, Junyong Noh, Xiaogang Jin and Joseph S. Shin

    Article first published online: 19 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.1708

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    In this paper, we present an online real-time method for automatically transforming a basic locomotive motion to a desired motion of the same type based on the following biomechanical observations: contact-driven center-of-mass control, anticipatory reorientation of upper body segments, moving speed adjustment, and whole-body leaning. Exploiting these observations, our method adds physical and behavioral naturalness to the resulting locomotive motions without preprocessing.

  3. Real-time screen-space liquid rendering with complex refractions

    Takuya Imai, Yoshihiro Kanamori and Jun Mitani

    Article first published online: 19 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.1707

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    We present a screen-space method for rendering particle-based liquids with up to four refractions in real time. The key idea is to separate particles into splashes and aggregations, and to apply strong screen-space smoothing to depth maps obtained from particles. We can also consider the Beer-Lambert law for physically based light attenuation in liquids

  4. Subtle features of ice with cloudy effects and scratches from collision damage

    Jong-Hyun Kim, Jaeho Im, Chang-Hun Kim and Jung Lee

    Article first published online: 19 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.1699

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    We propose a simulation framework for expressing cloudy effects and scratches on ice caused by the collision of other objects. Cloudy effects are created and diffused in proportion to the collision on the ice surfaces calculated by a combination of a grid-projection technique and the boundary particle method. To prevent dissipation during the diffusion process, a geodesic distance is used as a constraint. Scratches are modeled directionally by analyzing the density gradient of cloudy effects and rendered using needle-shaped ellipsoids.

  5. Incorporating particle motion into an ADF for fast coupling of fluids with rigid and deformable solids

    Jong-Hyun Kim, Chang-Hun Kim and Jung Lee

    Article first published online: 18 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cav.1689

    Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

    We present a new method for the fast simulation of interactions between fluids and solids by incorporating particle-based water flow into an adaptive signed distance field. In some previous methods, the motion of every water particle is checked when simulating the collision with the solid in the coupling process, and the computational cost becomes very great as the number of particles increases. If only the particles on the leaf nodes surrounding the solid are considered, this reduces the computational cost of collision detection, but some collisions may not be detected. This may lead to the “tunneling” artifact, in which particles with high velocities skip across the layer of leaf nodes.

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