Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials

Cover image for Vol. 105 Issue 2

Edited By: Jeremy L. Gilbert

Impact Factor: 2.881

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 16/33 (Materials Science Biomaterials); 17/76 (Engineering Biomedical)

Online ISSN: 1552-4981

Associated Title(s): Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A

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  • Surface heparin treatment of the decellularized porcine heart valve: Effect on tissue calcification

    Surface heparin treatment of the decellularized porcine heart valve: Effect on tissue calcification

    Hematoxylin-eosin staining of the porcine heart valve discs before and after implantation in rabbits for 60 days (magnification ×400). Before implantation, there were only cells seen in the control heart valve tissue in (A), while there were hardly any cells seen in the heart valve discs that had been decellularizated (B, C, and D). After implantation, the cells in the control heart valve discs were primarily accumulated on the surface (Ap). In the decellularizated (Bp) and the decellularizated plus glutaraldehyde cross-linking heart valve discs (Cp), there were a large number of newly migrating cells, likely cellular infiltrates, located both on the surface and inside the tissue. In the heart valve discs pretreated with heparin (Dp), however, there were hardly any cells that could be found after implantation for 60 days.

  • Ibuprofen loaded PLA nanofibrous scaffolds increase proliferation of human skin cells in vitro and promote healing of full thickness incision wounds in vivo

    Ibuprofen loaded PLA nanofibrous scaffolds increase proliferation of human skin cells in vitro and promote healing of full thickness incision wounds in vivo

    Hematoxylin and eosin staining of harvested skin samples from control wound sites without scaffolds (a,b,c), with acellular PLA/20 wt% ibuprofen scaffolds (d, e, f) and with HEK/HDF-seeded PLA/20 wt% ibuprofen scaffolds (g, h, i). Yellow lines and arrows delineate regions of regenerated skin from native skin (arrows point to regenerated skin region); (b, e, h): magnification of native, unwounded skin highlighted by blue boxes in (a, d, g), respectively; (c, f, i): magnification of regenerated skin highlighted by green boxes in (a, b, c), respectively. E: epidermis, D: dermis, HD: hypodermis, M: muscle, reE: regenerated epidermis, reD: regenerated dermis, SC: stratum corneum. Red arrows point to blood vessels formed in regenerated skin.

  • Biological and mechanical characterization of chitosan-alginate scaffolds for growth factor delivery and chondrogenesis

    Biological and mechanical characterization of chitosan‐alginate scaffolds for growth factor delivery and chondrogenesis

    Rabbit joint chondrocytes (RJCs) cultured on Ch-Al scaffolds after seeding in dilute fibrin at a density of 500,000 cells per construct. Constructs were collected at weeks 3 (a, b) and 6 (c-f). H&E (a, c), Alcian blue (b, d), SafraninO (e), and collagen type II immunohistochemistry (f) stained slides were imaged at 10x. Scale bar equals 100 μm.

  • In vivo evaluation of injectable calcium phosphate cement composed of Zn- and Si-incorporated β-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate for a critical sized defect of the rabbit femoral condyle

    In vivo evaluation of injectable calcium phosphate cement composed of Zn‐ and Si‐incorporated β‐tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate for a critical sized defect of the rabbit femoral condyle

    SEM images with X-ray microanalysis of MC3T3-E1 cell cultured IBS scaffolds (7 days) (a, IBS 1; b, IBS 2; c, IBS 3). In each map, brighter colors depict greater abundance. Ca, calcium; P, phosphorus; O, oxygen; Zn, zinc; Si, silicon and C, carbon.

  • Design and efficacy of a single-use bioreactor for heart valve tissue engineering

    Design and efficacy of a single‐use bioreactor for heart valve tissue engineering

    Images of the bioreactor showing, (a) the static seeding chamber, (b) the pulsatile chamber, and (c) the bioreactor cap. Note that the decellularized valve remains fixed to a single cap throughout the seeding process, facilitating easy transfer between chambers. The cap accommodates up to eight gas exchange filters. Coupled with the use of one-way check valves, a given filter may permit (1) inflow/outflow, (2) only outflow, or (3) only inflow of gas with respect to the seeding chamber. The use of one or more external restrictors (not shown) in concert with the desired filter configuration provides highly tunable chamber pressures during pulsatile conditioning. Note that the filter configuration shown in panel (c), comprising one inflow/outflow filter and an additional dedicated outflow filter, was used in conjunction with a single external restrictor for the seeding experiments described here.

  • Degradation of polypropylene in vivo: A microscopic analysis of meshes explanted from patients

    Degradation of polypropylene in vivo: A microscopic analysis of meshes explanted from patients

    Surface of the mesh fibers immediately after explantation from the body, transvaginal sling explanted due to pain 9 years after implantation, light microscope, ×20 objective with image crop. Mesh fibers at the specimen edges had no covering tissue and could be examined as they were in the body, avoiding possible artifacts of tissue removal, drying or contact with formalin. Both blue (a) and clear (b) fibers showed surface cracking.

  • Surface heparin treatment of the decellularized porcine heart valve: Effect on tissue calcification
  • Ibuprofen loaded PLA nanofibrous scaffolds increase proliferation of human skin cells in vitro and promote healing of full thickness incision wounds in vivo
  • Biological and mechanical characterization of chitosan‐alginate scaffolds for growth factor delivery and chondrogenesis
  • In vivo evaluation of injectable calcium phosphate cement composed of Zn‐ and Si‐incorporated β‐tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate for a critical sized defect of the rabbit femoral condyle
  • Design and efficacy of a single‐use bioreactor for heart valve tissue engineering
  • Degradation of polypropylene in vivo: A microscopic analysis of meshes explanted from patients

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Editor's Choice articles

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