Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution

Cover image for Vol. 328 Issue 1-2

Edited By: Günter P. Wagner

Impact Factor: 2.083

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2015: 25/161 (Zoology); 30/46 (Evolutionary Biology); 31/41 (Developmental Biology)

Online ISSN: 1552-5015

Associated Title(s): Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology

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Special Call for Papers on Social Insect Devo-Evo

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Special Call for Papers on Social Insect Devo-Evo

Recently Published Articles

  1. Brain Gene Expression is Influenced by Incubation Temperature During Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius) Development

    Maria Michela Pallotta, Mimmo Turano, Raffaele Ronca, Marcello Mezzasalma, Agnese Petraccioli, Gaetano Odierna and Teresa Capriglione

    Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22736

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    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

    Our findings indicate that embryo exposure to sex determining temperatures induces differential expression of several genes that are involved not only in gonad differentiation, but also in neural differentiation, synaptic plasticity, and metabolic pathways.

    A dimorphic neural network seems to differentiate during the TSP. This is likely necessary for adult animals to show sex-specific behaviors that are required for copulation and reproduction. Our preliminary findings thus suggest that the brains of SDT reptiles might be dimorphic at birth (Pritz, 2015). Therefore, behavioral experiences in postnatal development, which have been demonstrated to contribute to the brain's SD in later life (Coomber et al., 1997), would act on a structure already committed to male or female.

  2. The Regulation of Uterine Proinflammatory Gene Expression during Pregnancy in the Live-Bearing Lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii

    Kevin Hendrawan, Camilla M Whittington, Matthew C Brandley, Katherine Belov and Michael B Thompson

    Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22733

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    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

    During pregnancy, uterine proinflammatory gene expression is regulated transcriptionally (TNF) and posttranslationally (IL1B) in a live-bearing lizard, suggesting the presence of maternal immune regulation in reptilian viviparity.

  3. Comparative Morphology of the Penis and Clitoris in Four Species of Moles (Talpidae)

    Adriane Watkins Sinclair, Stephen Glickman, Kenneth Catania, Akio Shinohara, Lawrence Baskin and Gerald R. Cunha

    Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22732

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    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

    The presence/absence of ovotestes and the closeness of phylogenetic clades are poor predictors of sex differentiation features in mole external genitalia. Some male traits in female mole genitalia may develop independent of androgen.

  4. Enriched Environment Increases PCNA and PARP1 Levels in Octopus vulgaris Central Nervous System: First Evidence of Adult Neurogenesis in Lophotrochozoa

    Carla Bertapelle, Gianluca Polese and Anna Di Cosmo

    Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22735

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    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

    Proliferating cells in the central nervous system of adult Octopus vulgaris. Enriched environmental conditions affect adult neurogenesis. PCNA and PARP1 used as marker of cell proliferation and synaptogenesis, respectively. New perspective on adult neurogenesis in Lophotrochozoa. New methods and tools for improvements of welfare of cephalopods used as lab animals.

  5. Implications of Vertebrate Craniodental Evo-Devo for Human Oral Health

    Julia C. Boughner

    Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22734

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    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

    Molar impaction, malocclusion, and jaw joint disorders are born of human morphological Evo-Devo grating against sociocultural Evo. What we eat and how we chew may underpin widespread oral pathoses. Oral function is a promising noninvasive clinical target.

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