Journal of Traumatic Stress

Cover image for Journal of Traumatic Stress

Edited By: Daniel S. Weiss, Ph.D.

Impact Factor: 2.083

ISI Journal Citation Reports © Ranking: 2013: 41/111 (Psychology Clinical); 49/124 (Psychiatry (Social Science))

Online ISSN: 1573-6598


Author Guidelines


NIH Public Access Mandate
For those interested in the Wiley-Blackwell policy on the NIH Public Access Mandate, please visit our policy statement

Author Services – Online production tracking is now available for your article through Wiley-Blackwell's Author Services.
Author Services enables authors to track their article - once it has been accepted - through the production process to publication online and in print. Authors can check the status of their articles online and choose to receive automated emails at key stages of production. The author will receive an email with a unique link that enables them to register and have their article automatically added to the system. Please ensure that a complete email address is provided when submitting the manuscript. Visit http://authorservices.wiley.com/ for more details on online production tracking and for a wealth of resources including FAQs and tips on article preparation, submission and more.



Author Guidelines


1. The Journal of Traumatic Stress accepts submission of manuscripts online at:

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jots

Information about how to create an account or submit a manuscript may be found online in the "Get Help Now" menu. Personal assistance also is available by calling 434-817-2040, x167.

2. Three paper formats are accepted. All word counts should include references, tables, and figures. Regular articles (no longer than 6,000 words) are theoretical articles, full research studies, and reviews. Purely descriptive articles are rarely accepted. In special circumstances, the editors will consider longer manuscripts (up to 7,500 words) that describe complex studies. Authors are requested to seek special consideration prior to submitting manuscripts longer than 6,000 words. Brief reports (2,500 words) are for pilot studies or uncontrolled trials of an intervention, case studies that cover a new area, preliminary data on a new problem or population, condensed findings from a study that does not merit a full article, or methodologically oriented papers that replicate findings in new populations or report preliminary data on new instruments. Commentaries (1,000 words or less) cover responses to previously published articles or, occasionally, essays on a professional or scientific topic of general interest. Response commentaries, submitted no later than 8 weeks after the original article is published (12 weeks if outside the U.S.), must be content-directed and use tactful language. The original author is given the opportunity to respond to accepted commentaries.

3. The Journal follows the style recommendations of the 2010 Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA; 6th). Manuscripts should use non-sexist language. Files must be formatted using letter or A4 page size, 1 inch (2.54 cm) margins on all sides, Times New Roman 12 point font, and double-spacing for text, tables, figures, and references.

4. The title page should include the title of the article, the running head (maximum 50 characters) in uppercase flush left, author(s) byline and institutional affiliation, and author note (see pp. 23-25 of the APA manual).

5. An abstract no longer than 200 words follows the title page on a separate page.

6. Format the reference list using APA style: (a) begin on a new page following the text, (b) double-space, (c) use hanging indent format, (d) italicize the journal name or book title, and (e) list alphabetically by last name of first author. If a reference has a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), it must be included as the last element of the reference.

Journal Article

Kraemer, H.C. (2009). Events per person-time (incidence rate): A misleading statistic? Statistics in Medicine, 28, 1028–1039. doi: 10.1002/sim.3525

Book

Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Book Chapter

Meehl, P. E. (2006). The power of quantitative thinking. In N.G. Waller, L.J. Yonce, W.M. Grove, D. Faust, & M.F. Lenzenweger (Eds.), A Paul Meehl reader: Essays on the practice of scientific psychology (pp. 433–444). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

7. Tables and figures should be formatted in APA style. Count each full-page table or figure as 200 words and each half-page table or figure as 100 words. Tables should be numbered (with Arabic numerals) and referred to by number in the text. Each table and figure should begin on a separate page. Only black and white tables and figures will be accepted (no color). Figures (photographs, drawings, and charts) should be numbered (with Arabic numerals) and referred to by number in the text. Place figures captions at the bottom of the figure itself, not on a separate page. Include a separate legend to explain symbols if needed. Figures should be in Word, TIFF, or EPS format.

8. Footnotes should be avoided. When their use is absolutely necessary, footnotes should be formatted in APA style and placed on a separate page after the reference list and before any tables.

9. The Journal uses a policy of unmasked review. Author identities are known to reviewers; reviewer identities are not known to authors. During the submission process, authors may request that specific individuals not be selected as reviewers; the names of preferred reviewers also may be provided. Authors may request blind review by contacting jots@ucsf.edu prior to submission in order to provide justification and obtain further instructions.

10. Statement of ethical standards: All work submitted to the Journal of Traumatic Stress must conform to applicable governmental regulations and discipline-appropriate ethical standards. Responsibility for meeting these requirements rests with all authors. Human and animal research studies typically require approval by an institutional research committee that has been established to protect the welfare of human or animal subjects. Data collection as part of clinical services or for program evaluation purposes generally does not require approval by an institutional research committee. However, analysis and presentation of such data outside the program setting may qualify as research (i.e., an effort to produce generalizable knowledge) and require approval by an institutional committee. Those who submit manuscripts to the Journal of Traumatic Stress based on data from these sources are encouraged to consult with a representative of the applicable institutional committee to determine if approval is needed. Presentations that report on a particular person (e.g., a clinical case) also usually require written permission from that person to allow public disclosure for educational purposes, and involve alteration or withholding of information that might directly or indirectly reveal identity and breach confidentiality.

11. Reports of randomized clinical trials should include a flow diagram and a completed CONSORT checklist (available at http://consort-statement.org/resources/downloads). The checklist should be designated as a "Supplementary file not for review" during the online submission process. As of 2007, the Journal of Traumatic Stress now follows CONSORT Guidelines for the reporting of randomized clinical trials. Please visit http://consort-statement.org for information about the consort standards and to download necessary forms.

12. Submission is a representation that the manuscript has not been published previously and is not currently under consideration for publication elsewhere. A statement transferring copyright from the authors (or their employers, if they hold the copyright) to the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies will be required before the manuscript can be accepted for publication. Click on the Copyright Transfer Agreement link above for the form. Such a written transfer of copyright, which previously was assumed to be implicit in the act of submitting a manuscript, is necessary under the U.S. Copyright Law in order for the publisher to carry through the dissemination of research results and reviews as widely and effectively as possible.

13. Pre-Submission English-Language Editing: Authors for whom English is a second language may choose to have their manuscript professionally edited before submission to improve the English. Japanese authors can find a list of local English improvement services at http://www.wiley.co.jp/journals/editcontribute.html. All services are paid for and arranged by the author, and use of one of these services does not guarantee acceptance or preference for publication.

14. The author(s) are required to adhere to the "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct" of the American Psychological Association (visit apastyle.org) or equivalent guidelines in the study's country of origin. If the author(s) were unable to comply, an explanation is requested.

15. The journal makes no page charges. Author Services – Online production tracking is now available for your article through Wiley-Blackwell’s Author Services. Author Services enables authors to track their article - once it has been accepted - through the production process to publication online and in print. Authors can check the status of their articles online and choose to receive automated emails at key stages of production. The author will receive an email with a unique link that enables them to register and have their article automatically added to the system. Please ensure that a complete email address is provided when submitting the manuscript. Visit http://authorservices.wiley.com/ for more details on online production tracking and for a wealth of resources including FAQs and tips on article preparation, submission, and more. Corresponding authors: In lieu of a complimentary copy free access to the final PDF offprint of your article will be available via Author Services only. Please therefore sign up for Author Services if you would like to access your article PDF offprint and enjoy the many other benefits the service offers. Should you wish to purchase reprints of your article, please click on the link and follow the instructions provided: https://caesar.sheridan.com/reprints/redir.php?pub=10089&acro=JTS

16. OnlineOpen The Journal of Traumatic Stress accepts articles for Open Access publication. Please visit http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-406241.html for further information about OnlineOpen.

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